Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
MrFr33z3

Fermentation Temps/Duration Questions

Recommended Posts

Hello, folks... I'm hoping some input from you guys will settle my nerves a bit.

This past Saturday, I brewed a batch as follows:

------------------------------------------------
Dubbel-Byte:
------------------------------------------------
1 Can Octoberfest Vienna Lager
1 Can Whispering Wheat Weizenbier
1lb Dark DME
1/2 Cup Light Brown Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Coriander
2 Packets Dry Brewing Yeast (under lid of beer mix)
~1/2 oz. Sterling Pellet Hops

I'm hoping things will turn out right, but Sunday morning, I wanted to drop the temp a bit, so I threw some ice in the pan of water that the keg sits in, and the thing dropped to around 62 degrees! Maybe even lower. In my quest for further cooling, I may have screwed up my batch. I wasn't factoring the A/C unit I put in my office recently, which had been on for a while, and that the office was then *much* cooler than normal, which caused the fermenter temps to drop really fast!

Anyway, I noticed the "activity" was curbed quite a bit when the temp dropped that low, so I turned off the A/C in there, the fan, etc. and I've been keeping it between 70-72 now. However, what started with a 1/2 inch-think krausen on the top, is now a slight trickle of light carbonation popping up to the surface.

I hope I haven't put the yeast to sleep completely! I know radically dropping the temps is how the bigger brew-shops shock their yeast to sleep.

Anyone have a similar experience?

Also, if I'm in the clear, about how long should one consider fermenting this, given what has occurred and the ~72 temps I'm maintaining now?

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, that looks like a GREAT brew!!

Second, I think you are fine. Through different means, I did essentially the same thing with my current brew, a very dark milk stout. It brewed at 60-64 for 8 days, I did SG and taste test today, it is FINE...it does still have a ways to go, it is likely brewing slower than my normal stuff, but it is brewing great just the same, so fear not, and be patient.

Let me know how this turns out, I may steal that recipe!!

Brew On!!

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, man!

Second, I think you are fine. Through different means, I did essentially the same thing with my current brew, a very dark milk stout.


Very dark milk stout? Have you posted that one? :) Sounds gooood.

It brewed at 60-64 for 8 days, I did SG and taste test today, it is FINE...it does still have a ways to go, it is likely brewing slower than my normal stuff, but it is brewing great just the same, so fear not, and be patient.


Okay - That certainly helps to know. I thought that lower-60's wasn't a good point for the yeasties to run wild. I'm hoping to experience a smoother brew, now that I have the A/C unit in the office to offset the all the darn computer equipment! It's actually a pleasure to work in there now, and my brews shouldn't come out so... "stark", due to the higher fermentation temps.

Let me know how this turns out, I may steal that recipe!!


I certainly will! This is the first time I've actually gone and messed with a somewhat tweaked/custom recipe. I'm hoping for the best. You will receive extra "geek-cred" points if you "get" the name of the brew. :P

As I don't have my hydrometer yet (yeah, yeah, I know...), about how long should I keep the thing going? I was thinking around 3 weeks at the current temps. Does that sound about right to you?

Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dubbel Byte? Dude, I test and write software for a livin. ;)

While I know what they write on the packaging and web sites, my own experiments agree with you completely. 70 and higher..."stark" is a good adjective. 68 and lower...yuuummmmiieee.....

As for how long, when I review my notes over the last few months, the number 17 is all over them. 17 days and in the bottle it goes, and life is workin good.

As for that recipe...

The Waters of Maraw
-------------------
Brewer: David Gilbert
Style: Milk Stout
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.080 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 28 IBU
Recipe Color: 43° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.020
Alcohol by Volume: 7.8%
Alcohol by Weight: 6.1%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.11 lb, Sugar, Other
Honey 0.20 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Booster 0.81 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout2.42 lb, Extract, Extract
dark DME 1.00 lb, Grain, Other

Fuggles 0.50 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout2.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes

Cocoa 0.50 unit, Other, 1/2 Cup Hershey Cocoa added to the boil
Lactose 0.50 unit, Additive, 1/2 lb of Lactose, boiled into the priming sugar
Sumatra Coffee 1.00 unit, Other, 1 Packet of Sumatra Coffee added to the boil


The Sumatra Coffee...I used one of the "Personal Cup of Coffee" pre packed little coffee bags...think, tea bag, but coffee. Boiled it for about 5 minutes in the wort, then tossed it. I was specifically NOT going for coffee flavor, just the subtlest hint.

Brew On!!

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I brewed my Octoberfest on Sunday, this was my first batch adding in DME as well as dark brown sugar. As of right now, fermentation looks great. There is a layer of foam at the top and it looks no different than my first two batches, however I am having trouble controlling the temperature with this one, even though I am using the wet t shirt method. My last batch was a Nut Brown Ale and with the wet t shirt I was able to keep the temps around 73 degrees. However, my octoberfest seems to be staying around 77 and the outside climate is not different.

So is the increasing temperature because I added brown sugar and DME so there is more to ferment? From the looks of my batch everything seems to be ok but I can never know until that first taste, and I know temperature control is vital in brewing beer. Any insights on how to keep the beer more cold? Change the t shirt more often?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're fine. As everyone else is telling you lower temps just slow the brew down a little. HIGHER temps on the other hand can contribute to major off flavors. When the yeast cool off they just relax, that's all. Don't sweat it. Have a beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mcgrewc wrote:

You're fine. As everyone else is telling you lower temps just slow the brew down a little. HIGHER temps on the other hand can contribute to major off flavors. When the yeast cool off they just relax, that's all. Don't sweat it. Have a beer.

This morning it was 77 and when I got home from work about an hour ago it was 75...and I re-wet the t shirt. The foam or "Krausen" has died down a bit, but I appreciate it thanks.

And I'm extremely excited for this beer I dont want off flavors ha!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi1mnick wrote:

mcgrewc wrote:

You're fine. As everyone else is telling you lower temps just slow the brew down a little. HIGHER temps on the other hand can contribute to major off flavors. When the yeast cool off they just relax, that's all. Don't sweat it. Have a beer.

This morning it was 77 and when I got home from work about an hour ago it was 75...and I re-wet the t shirt. The foam or "Krausen" has died down a bit, but I appreciate it thanks.

And I'm extremely excited for this beer I dont want off flavors ha!

That means the yeast is AWAKE. I try to keep mine under 70 but it's tough and not always possible. And I still brew awesome beer now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha right now keeping my beer under 70 would be quite difficult, I love my new hobby but I think it is beginning to annoy my parents since I'm still a college student and living at home. It takes up a bit of room at times. :-P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had temp worrys for awhile too. I was going about 80 at peak fermentation and everything came out really good. I started using the wet tshirt method and my temp have been down to 74-76 during peak and but I cant say I can taste a difference but it makes me feel better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dubbel Byte? Dude, I test and write software for a livin. ;)


Ha! Thought so. Same here, except I only test what I write. :)

While I know what they write on the packaging and web sites, my own experiments agree with you completely. 70 and higher..."stark" is a good adjective. 68 and lower...yuuummmmiieee.....


Well, this brew will be my first that I'm keeping around 70-72. Prior batches have probably peaked at around 76-78, regrettably. But that won't happen again (*knocks on wood).

As for how long, when I review my notes over the last few months, the number 17 is all over them. 17 days and in the bottle it goes, and life is workin good.


17? Okay, I'll give it a shot then. Looks like you enjoy some pretty hefty beer yourself, so I trust it.

The Waters of Maraw


Looks awesome. Gotta try that one.

The Sumatra Coffee...


I'm a coffee head. The blacker, the better. In fact... I'm whipping up a partial grain 6 gal. (non-MB) batch of stout this weekend with a friend of mine, and we plan on throwing some French Roast into the mix when batch-priming, before splitting the batch into smaller fermentation vessels. He mentioned reading that for stouts, a good approach is steeping the coffee grounds in a container filled with water in the fridge for 24 hours prior to throwing it in. We'll see how the batch turns out!

I may have a shortage of fridge space in the coming weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mcgrewc wrote:

You're fine. As everyone else is telling you lower temps just slow the brew down a little. HIGHER temps on the other hand can contribute to major off flavors. When the yeast cool off they just relax, that's all. Don't sweat it. Have a beer.


Thanks, mcgrewc. Not sure if that was directed to me or hi1mnick, but I suppose that bit of advice would pertain to my original post regardless. Glad to hear from you guys about the lower temps. I'm hoping to smooth things out with my latest "experiment", but don't want to screw up my batch or bottle prematurely. Looks like I should be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CrazyBrody -- I would agree that you probably won't notice a difference moving from 78-80 down to 74-76. But when you get to 70-72, you should notice a huge difference...72 is the magic number for me.

MrFr33z3 -- last time I made this, I did not use coffee, but I added the cocoa to the batch priming. BIG MISTAKE...so now, for me, everything goes in the build, not the installer. ;)

However, if you soak the coffee, and then just add the liquid, that would fix the problems I had, so that might work. I just thought the coffee, and the cocoa, would both benefit from the boil. Smelled awesome in the kitchen!!

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SiriusDG wrote:


As for that recipe...

The Waters of Maraw
-------------------
Brewer: David Gilbert
Style: Milk Stout
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.080 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 28 IBU
Recipe Color: 43° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.020
Alcohol by Volume: 7.8%
Alcohol by Weight: 6.1%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.11 lb, Sugar, Other
Honey 0.20 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Booster 0.81 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout2.42 lb, Extract, Extract
dark DME 1.00 lb, Grain, Other

Fuggles 0.50 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. Sticky Wicket Oatmeal Stout2.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes

Cocoa 0.50 unit, Other, 1/2 Cup Hershey Cocoa added to the boil
Lactose 0.50 unit, Additive, 1/2 lb of Lactose, boiled into the priming sugar
Sumatra Coffee 1.00 unit, Other, 1 Packet of Sumatra Coffee added to the boil

Dave,

Please update us on how this recipe is comming along!

edit:

Hey Dave,

I just put this recipe into QBrew (exactly how you mentioned above) to mess around with it for ideas and the characteristics I got were totally different. Check it out:

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.063 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 41 IBU
Estimated FG: 1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 6.1%
Alcohol by Weight: 4.8%

What up wit dat?!?

Also when you have a chance, please clairify for me when and how you added the lactose. You mentioned it was boiled into the priming sugar. Do you mean for bottling? (ie. batch priming) or were you referring to the light brown sugar..?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either one of you missed or added an ingredient/amount or one of you is using an older Qbrew database.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My QBrew database is dated 8/1/2009.

I am pretty sure my numbers are closer than yours, because that high of an IBU would kill me.

Update: tasted this yesterday. This may be the best thing I have ever made. Very complex, all the flavors, nice hint of alcohol as it glides over the lips, the coffee is there, the chocolate is there...just really yummy, only 14 days in the keg, I actually stuck the keg into the fridge last night, on track for my traditional 17 day bottling date.

As far as lactose, I meant in the priming sugar for batch priming, as I batch prime everything. However, in this batch, I did actually boil it into the wort, as 1/2 lb is a lot for the priming. I normally will add 2 tbs of lactose at batch prime for a beer that needs just a little body lift and sweetness coming out of the keg. So I normally wait, so I can make the decision whether or not to add it at the end. In this case, being round two on this brew, I had a pretty good idea where I was going.

The only real thing to keep in mind is that lactose does not ferment, and QBrew does not account for it, so if you add it to the word, simply add 10 pts (for 1/2 lb) to BOTH your OG and FG numbers, that should bring you back to reality.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SiriusDG wrote:

My QBrew database is dated 8/1/2009.

I am pretty sure my numbers are closer than yours, because that high of an IBU would kill me.

Hey Sirius, is yours version 0.4.1? Thats what I'm using... Where can you check to see your QBrew database date?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is the right version of the program, yes. To find the date of the data file, just look in the folder where QBrew is installed, right click on the qbrewdata file, select properties, and it should be there.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest System Admin

my brewometer says 66 degrees.. is it too low? and if so is there any warming suggestions

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my brewometer says 66 degrees.. is it too low? and if so is there any warming suggestions


I brew at temps that low. Makes great beer.


Darn you Northerners! The best I can do down here in FL is 70-72! Can't wait for the "winter" down here, when all the windows are open and my brew room stays in the 60's and 70's without intervention.

BTW - Congrats on being BotM, mcgrewc!

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My future son in law is in Orlando and is getting the bug. I suspect we'll see him on here in the coming months so I hope someone has kept the links to all the wet-t-shirt threads... And yes, we are lucky up this way to have cool basements! Thanks for the congrats. Others deserved it more than me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reporting back on the recipe/batch, as promised...

Well, I'm sold. Cooler temps make for a MUCH better beer. I know, I know... This is nothing new. However, for those of us battling with the heat and brewing in higher temps here in the warmer parts of the country, I feel I should take the time to pop on here and report on a definitive result.

As a recap, I brewed this recipe (yay QBrew):

Code:
Dubbel-Byte
----------------------
Brewer: MrFr33z3
Style: Belgian Dubbel?
Batch: 2.13 gal Extract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.070 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 23 IBU
Recipe Color: 15° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.018
Alcohol by Volume: 6.8%
Alcohol by Weight: 5.3%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.20 lb, Sugar, Other
Dark DME 1.00 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Whispering Wheat Weizenbier 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract

MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. Whispering Wheat Weizenbier 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
Sterling 0.50 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes

Corriander Seed 1.00 unit, Spice, 1 Teaspoon

It was the first time I was able to actually control the temps in my office, where I ferment my brew. I have an A/C unit in here with a built-in thermostat now, which has helped greatly.

I've been carbing for a week now, and just popped open a bottle I stuck in the fridge last night. WOW - The best batch to date. The coriander needs to mellow a bit, but what a SMOOTH beer! I've dealt with a high-yeasty flavors, fusel (ugh), and an overall "stark" finish in my MB brews. Not enough to deter me, obviously, but it has driven me to "debug" my brewing/fermentation routines. Turns out the temps were to blame all along.

Should anyone stumble upon this thread, and make it to this post, PLEASE do yourself a favor and take the temperature end of brewing as seriously as anything else. I feel this isn't stressed enough in the manuals, etc., but it really makes the difference between an "okay" or even a "marginally acceptable" result and an AWESOME result.

This was a true eye-opener for me - I'm so stoked, I'm brewing two batches tomorrow!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MrFr33z3 wrote:

Should anyone stumble upon this thread, and make it to this post, PLEASE do yourself a favor and take the temperature end of brewing as seriously as anything else. I feel this isn't stressed enough in the manuals, etc., but it really makes the difference between an "okay" or even a "marginally acceptable" result and an AWESOME result.

This was a true eye-opener for me - I'm so stoked, I'm brewing two batches tomorrow!


:chug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well then...I hate the cold but I am actually looking forward to the winter. I am going to purchase a fan to help keep my temps down, because the T shirt is not cutting it. Just out of curiosity, how long do people wait to switch or re-soak the t shirt they are using on their keg?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi1mnick wrote:

well then...I hate the cold but I am actually looking forward to the winter. I am going to purchase a fan to help keep my temps down, because the T shirt is not cutting it. Just out of curiosity, how long do people wait to switch or re-soak the t shirt they are using on their keg?


Take a look at this thread:
http://community.mrbeer.com/index.php?option=com_kunena&Itemid=58&func=view&catid=11&id=27164#27189

That's the approach I'm using, and it's dirt cheap. I keep about an inch of water in the pan, as that will become absorbed by the chamois material as it evaporates, cooling the fermenter in the process. It should never become dry in this case. However, in the morning, I'll dump a bit of ice in the pan, keeping the pan full, and cooling the water temp. I've been able to keep the fermentation temps around 74-76 this way.

Now, as I stated earlier, my latest success is a result of having an A/C unit installed in the window that sits above my fermenters. I've been keeping the office at about 75-76, which brings the fermentation temps down to around 68-70 or so. We have central air, but due to my computer equipment, etc., it was reaching up to about 85 degrees, with the door closed, before the addition of the window unit.

If you're going the chamois route and don't have ample cooling in the room, cut a hole at the top of the chamois, and make sure it hugs the keg. Make sure a fan is pointed at it the whole time, and use ice in the morning - even more often during the first 48-72 hours.

I can finally say that I speak from experience... You can sanitize your heart out, create the perfect recipe, have the purest water, but if the temps get too high, you won't be as happy as you should be with your results. After all, the Fall/Winter seasonal periods are considered the "busy time" for homebrewers, according to the folks at Midwest Supplies. This is obviously to take advantage of the cooler months... Ordering from those guys during that period pushes your order out 3-5 days more, due to the number of orders they receive around then - their words, not mine.

Okay - back to work...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How often do you change the chamois? Does mold become a problem? Also, if your putting an inch of water in the pan does that reach the spigot of the keg? I supposed you do not want water as high as the spigot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am on my third round with the ShamWows, and they are not wicking up the water as well as they did originally. I wet them down morning and evening. I have not had a mold problem, but a bit of smum and slim does form. I put a few drops of bleach in the water, but the smell was pretty strong, so I am not doing that now. I actually notched the plastic tub that the kegs sit in, so the spigot hangs out. This keeps them out of the way, but more importantly, makes sampling very easy. I keep the water level at about 1 inch, and the entire tub is tilted back, front is about two inches higher than back.

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi1mnick wrote:

How often do you change the chamois? Does mold become a problem? Also, if your putting an inch of water in the pan does that reach the spigot of the keg? I supposed you do not want water as high as the spigot.


I haven't had to change mine at all. After the 2-3 week fermentation period, I simply wash out the chamois, soak in either OxiClean or a weak sodium hypochlorite (bleach/chlorine) solution for an hour, rinse a bit, and hang it on the clothesline outside to dry overnight.

I turn the spigot clockwise 90 degrees so that it doesn't stick in the water, but you can simply place something under the front of the keg to lift it a bit. That also helps the trub settle in the rear of the keg more, should you be adding more fermentables than the built-in base can collect. I have the "upgraded" spigot on my kegs (I use the wands when bottling).

NOTE: There are different kinds of chamois out there. Find the kind that is most like felt, but keep it cheap. I found a couple that have been working out really well that I picked up in the mop isle in the local K-Mart.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SiriusDG wrote:

I have not had a mold problem, but a bit of smum and slim does form.


Yeah, I've noticed that as well. The fermenter is a bit "slimy" at the end of the cycle, so I spritz it down and wipe it with whatever sanitizer I'm using. I also always spray the spigot down really well, and let sanitizer sit it the spigot outlet for a while before bottling!

I put a few drops of bleach in the water, but the smell was pretty strong, so I am not doing that now.


I've been meaning to try that myself, since we always have chlorine on-hand for the pool - Even a few drops is too much?

I keep the water level at about 1 inch, and the entire tub is tilted back, front is about two inches higher than back.


Yeah, I started doing this a couple batches ago... This approach works pretty well, actually, but I only lift mine 1/2-1" in the front.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to give this a try. I am planning on doing a stout soon and I really want it to turn out well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.


Ha! True statement. Never really looked at it that way! :blush:

Our round-the-clock A/C usage is indeed justified, to say the least, and stays that way until about mid-December. That differs each year though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.

I live in Maryland which is not too that South, but it wasn't until this summer that I realized how warm my basement gets in the summer. It has always been the coolest room in the house, but after brewing beer and sticking a thermometer in the room it tends to be about 78 degrees, this was a shocker because I have AC and its the basement. Oh well, I am hooked on the brewing thing and I am determined to control temps of my beer. I am on a mission Ha!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.

looks like it's time for a mini fridge and a controller. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.

I just noticed yesterday that with fall hitting my bucket dropped from 66 to 60. Gotta go down and move it today to a warmer area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.


norman1,
You might try an Archers Orchard Cider or two. They ferment a little warmer 73-81 F. as per Mr Beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sham Addams wrote:

norman1 wrote:

Sometimes I think you Southerners have an advantage where you run AC 24/7. I live in Minnesota and have decided to quit until winter. It's 78 in the house and basement too. I can't justify running the AC just for the beer. Gonna have serious holes in the pipline late fall & early winter.


norman1,
You might try an Archers Orchard Cider or two. They ferment a little warmer 73-81 F. as per Mr Beer.

Also there are specific yeasts that will ferment at higher temps without off flavors supposedly. http://www.skotrat.com/go/default/brewing-info/yeast-yeast-specifications/yeast-details/?cat=125
http://www.skotrat.com/go/default/brewing-info/yeast-yeast-specifications/yeast-details/?cat=205 etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mcgrewc wrote:

I just noticed yesterday that with fall hitting my bucket dropped from 66 to 60. Gotta go down and move it today to a warmer area.


I'll give you my address... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MrFr33z3 wrote:

mcgrewc wrote:

I just noticed yesterday that with fall hitting my bucket dropped from 66 to 60. Gotta go down and move it today to a warmer area.


I'll give you my address... ;)

:laugh: I was on my way over, then I discovered a warmer spot in my basement...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can tell you here in New York the summer kind of kills the bewing. The temps are too hot, even in the crawl space under the kithcen. I have started brewing again though. In the winter I am going to try laggering in the crawl space. Let you know how it goes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ekummel wrote:

Here is my fermentation configuration.
IMAGE_107
It keeps things at around 72 degrees...
Ed

How does it cool? Is that just a fan or some type of small refrigerant setup? I'm interested because my future SIL lives in Orlando...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct me if I'm wrong here...

Looks like one of those low-power Peltier/thermoelectric-based coolers, which is really the only way you can get any kind of cooling in a small cooler like that. It's just like a Peltier heat-sinks for CPU's, I suppose, which I've used in the past. The approach uses an electric current to draw heat away from another area, and a fan to disperse whatever heat is collected.

Pretty sure it's one of those, anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MrFr33z3 wrote:

Correct me if I'm wrong here...

Looks like one of those low-power Peltier/thermoelectric-based coolers, which is really the only way you can get any kind of cooling in a small cooler like that. It's just like a Peltier heat-sinks for CPU's, I suppose, which I've used in the past. The approach uses an electric current to draw heat away from another area, and a fan to disperse whatever heat is collected.

Pretty sure it's one of those, anyway.

yep, that what it is. and it could be used in the winter to keep your brew at a warmer if your brew space gets too cold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. It's the peltier cooling system. There are two fans. One on the outside and one on the inside. It can bring the inside temperature down to 30 degrees below ambient temperature. So, if it's 75 degrees in your basement, this can bring the cooler temperature down to 45 degrees. I have a smaller one at my desk at work. it holds 6 cans of soda. This way, I always have a cold soda waiting for me. I've used peltier coolers for years. I even used one to overclock a CPU...got it really up there too...Unfortunately, I pushed the peltier too hard and burned it out...and when that happens, it heats instead of cools....which is a bad thing!
Anyway, I got the cooler for free (family member no longer needed it). the Johnson thermostat for $36 on eBay and the 12 volt powersupply for $4 at goodwill. And the cool thing is that it fit and I was able to put it together with mostly existing parts!
Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...