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LordVader1897

Apple type taste and smell after fermentation???

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    Hello, let me start off by saying that I am new to home brewing. I have done one batch of "Grand Bohemian Czech

Pilsner" and now I am brewing "Dad's Favorite Cream Ale". The first one (czech), when I thought it was done fermenting before I bottled it, had a apple like smell, sort of like cider or apple juice to it. I new it had fermented for the two weeks it told me, and I used the hydrometer which said it was ready, so I bottled it. When it was ready I thought it had a slight taste and smell of apples still, but no one agreed with me so I thought maybe it was suppossed to. 

    

     Now my "Dad's Favorite Cream Ale" that has been fermenting for 3 weeks I thought was ready to bottle but it has a slight apple smell and taste, however it is significantly less than I remember. The hydrometer says it is ready but I will try to wait longer. Also with this one, I used a booster which I had not used last time and both times I have used the sticky thermometer that pretty much stays at 72, but I dont check it in the middle of the night so it may drop. Also my next brew is "Vlad the Impale Ale" so does anyone have any pointers for that?

On a side note, last time I bottled, one bottle had some ashy looking stuff settled in the bottom, anyone know what caused this? I used the carbonation drops, I dont know if those or sugar is better. Sorry for the long post, thanks in advance for the help.

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Normal questions - asked many times on these forums.

3-4.  3 weeks fermenting and 4 weeks in the bottle at room temp.  Then, put in the frig only what you're ready to drink in 2 or 3 days.  Drinking too early yields poor tasting brews.

Ferment lower.  Mid 60s are ideal.  It will climb up to 6-8 degrees when the fermentation is its most active, so mid-60s is best to start.  

All bottles should have trub on the bottom - same as in the fermenter.  It's dead yeast, putting sugar or carb drops in the bottle creates a mini-fermentation.  Doesn't matter what you use, you'll get the same end result.  

For best taste, poor gently into a glass, not stirring up the trub, and leave the last 1/4" in the bottle.  

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Rick's right. 

That apple smell is probably just beer that's not quite ready. If the hydrometer says it's ready (same readings 2 days apart) you can bottle, and the conditioning period will cause a lot of those flavors to go away. Fermenting cooler will help too, but what you have should be fine once it's sat in the bottle at room temperature for a month or so. As the weather cools it should be easier to keep temperatures around the mid 60s. A pan under the LBK and a wet towel over it will help keep the temperature a few degrees lower, too. 

I've used sugar and carbonation drops, and I don't think there's a difference in the end result. Carbonation is the result of fermentation with no place for the gas to go except into solution, and trub is part of the process. Carbonation drops are handy, but it's still sugar. 

Happy brewing!

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Great solutions, pspearing and Rickbeer. Just so you have a better understanding of what exactly is happening with your beer, LordVader, that apple/cidery flavor is a very common off flavor of young beer. It's caused by the abundance of acetaldehyde in your beer, which is the precursor to ethanol, the alcohol in your beer. Sometimes the precursor tends to leak out of the yeast, and just as pspearing said, this is encouraged by too warm of temperatures. It takes time and contact with the yeast to help reabsorb the acetaldehyde and convert it to ethanol.

Fun Fact, the alcohol in your beer can be reversed back into acetaldehyde if your beer if exposed to oxygen and warm temperature. In a nutshell, there are two causes of a cidery beer: 1) Impatience and 2) Aerating and warming of the beer.

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LordVader not to be out of sorts , but , are you sure that it is not just you? Not trying to be a smartass . I do mainly AG and have not tried those yet .  Just sayin , let some different people try b4 you get a bad feeling.  But, yes , impatience is you worst enemy!! I know from experience!!  Let it sit for a couple of EXTRA weeks , and then try . Might mellow out some.

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I have added too mutch honey when [ batch priming ] 3/4 cup in to 5gal ,,,,it was a bit of cider in the back round,,,, best of luck ,,

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