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ocnart

Mr. Beer's yeast gone BAD, again! Can I use baker's yeast ?

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I have spent over $250 on Mr. Beer brew batches. The first half came out fine. The past two did not ferment. I tested the yeast, it was dead. Mr. Beer states nothing about how long the yeast will last, or how to store it. There is an expiration date on the MHE can, several years out. I read their brew book and instructions, and did not see anything about yeast care. Mr. Beer wants me to buy more of their yeast.  I said NO, and they should state info about yeast care and life expectancy.

Anyone who has used baker's yeast, or similar, please reply. I can buy baker's yeast anywhere in town, and if it's bad, they will replace it for free. I thought about mixing the bad Mr. Beer yeast with good baker's yeast. Is it OK to mix yeasts? I know the flavor will be off. I just want to salvage the batches I have left the easiest way possible, and buy yeast I know will work, but not sink too much more money into this project.

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First I've ever seen someone claim Mr. Beer yeast has issues.  They have great customer service.  The fact that they didn't replace it for you implies they feel nothing is wrong with it.  I suspect you are doing something wrong.

Do NOT use Baker's yeast.  Reexamine your process.

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HI,

I have a batch fermenting with baker's yeast as we speak, in fact it's about ready to bottle. I did this purely as an experiment, just to see how it would turn out. It looks and smells just like most of the other beer I've made, and I expect it to be good. When I've tasted the finished product I'll report back.

I've NEVER gotten dead yeast from Mr. Beer, and I've brewed a good amount of beer, mostly from Mr. Beer refills--is it possible that something about the shipping, handling, or storage conditions is killing it? It's pretty sensitive to high temperatures. 

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I suspect that there is something about the temperature you pitch the yeast, or store the yeast. Dry yeast has long shelf life if kept cool, and if pitched near 70 deg F, it should be fine. In a similar post it was advised against using bakers yeast. Would you use a beagle to pull a dog sled? They are the same species yet very different, just like bakers yeast and yeast for brewing.

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A dog breeder I know slightly told me that a team of standard poodles ran in (and finished) the Iditarod at least once.

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pspearing said:A dog breeder I know slightly told me that a team of standard poodles ran in (and finished) the Iditarod at least once.

So what you're saying is I need 11 packets of bakers yeast?  LOL  j/k

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Baker's yeast's purpose is to create lots of CO2 with no thoughts to alchol although it will indeed do it.  I haven't tried it, but somewhere if you do a search here there was a whole thread on using baker's yeast.

I also must stress that Mr.Beer has great customer service.  However, if you went through $125 worth of batches before bringing it up to them it may look like the customer who ate all of his steak but one bite before complaining that it was overcooked.  They have even replaced ingredients that I purchased elsewhere when my spigot broke.

I also have not heard of any problems with the yeast.  We usually suggest that people who've had it sitting in an uncontrolled environment for more than two-ish years replace it to be on the safe side.  In almost all cases it is caused by excessive heat when the yeast is pitched.  Also, remember, the fermentation temperature could be well over ambient.

How did you test the yeast to see it was dead?  I could see it being less viable, but for everything to be dead out of the bag seems a bit strange.

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I agree with the general sentiment.. your process must be flawed somewhere. post what you did. maybe we can help. yeast are really hardy. it takes a lot to kill them and ive used expired packs of yeast with success. extreme heat can kill yeast. I boil packs of yeast to kill them when using dead yeast as food for live yeast. cold just makes them sleepy. dumping them in boiling wort will kill them.


now to answer your question- I made a quick mead using fleischmans bread yeast. it worked but the mead tasted funky and the yeast is so fine in size, that the slightest jarring of the bottles sent up a cloud of silt. it would be a mistake to use it in beer. you could... but don't expect any good beer.

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