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RickBeer

Are you a new brewer? Then read this.

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Couldn't have been put any better, Rick. Just thinking back the whole month that I have been brewing here, noob myself, I found that there is plenty of time to read and learn from these forums from the time the wort is added to the LBK and time to bottle! My first taste of the Powerful Patriot Ale is due to be had next Sunday, week 4 of conditioning and from there I will be able to see the taste difference as it conditions further!

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great stuff. I knew I would be one of the impatient ones, as with everything else in my life, so I have 4 LBKs going and am contemplating getting a 5 gallon kit as well. luckily my first two batches, although green, were still quite enjoyable and I learned a lot from them and plan to learn something from every batch I do in the future. 

I am a part of a handful of communities and have a couple of projects rolling so I don't have time to visit every beer forum but this one has been a great asset so far, great community here at Mr. Beer. 

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Very good advice Rick.  I did the 2-1 method, but only put in one bottle after one week of conditioning.  I have been reading this forum since i got my kit for christmas.  I know it is my impatience & curiosity that is to blame for cidery beer. I still have the rest f the bottles conditioning.  Have an american porter in the lbk now.  On week 2. I will wait one more week to bottle as recomended by the masses. And condition for 4.

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The ability to search the forums is a great thing. Lots of information can be found that way. But for many it helps to have an actual interacting conversation. I'd rather encourage questions by answering them than continually push the search feature. Sure, for some it's just a lazy way to find the answers. But for many it is a more interesting approach. Lets them get to know others and lets others get to know those asking.

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Great post, Rick.  Your advice about reading and searching is good.  Having 1840 posts about what temp to ferment at means that a lot of experienced brewers have spent time answering the same question, which is answered in Mr Beer's basic instructions, probably at the expense of spending time giving good answers to other questions.  On the other side, besides the repeated questions, I do see people doing good searches, finding posts from a couple of years ago, and reviving the topics, which are often full of good info.  One catch, though: the original people might not be here now, so may not respond to questions. 

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A couple of other good points from Rick's post:  You will learn the most, fastest, by trying a basic recipe straight first, then making incremental changes.  If you change multiple things (ingredients, procedures, etc.) all at once, you won't know what doesn't give you the expected results.  For me, some of my 41 LBK batches have been refinements on previous recipes, and many of my 33 1-gallon batches have been to try ingredients, compare ingredients (like several that used a simple recipe and varied just the type of yeast), and test recipes before committing to a larger batch.  Another interesting learning experience is to bottle in 12-oz bottles, and try one per week to see how the beer conditions during the 4 weeks after fermenting.  That's harder to do during fermentation, but with a refractometer, you only use a small sample to monitor the progress.  As your palate gets refined, you can start to taste the cidery acetaldehyde and the buttery diacetyl, and taste how they disappear later in the 3-week fermentation even when your OG drops within days.  These are initial yeast byproducts that you don't want in your final beer. 

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I fully agree with what Rick says. Knowledge is power. I still a newbie at this,( 3batches undery belt ). And I wish I had joined and read the forums earlier. Made my first batch (cal ) & rushed it by the forum standards . It was ok, it was neer thst I made . After readinh the posts om the forum, I learned ALOT !! So enjoy the hobby & learn all you can . If you have a question ask it . There are no dumb questions , just people like myself wanting to get better at the hobby . Also PATIENCE is your friend . Thanks again Rick & Cheers everyome . Brew On !!

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reading is good.  I hadn't heard about the 3-4, just the 2-2-2 which is what I am in the middle of right now with my first batch.

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3-2-2 and 3-4 are the same.  All at room temp.  Since you do nothing different between carbonation (the middle 2) and conditioning (the last 2), we call it 3-4.

Edit - shouldn't have replied early before coffee...  What I meant to say is that 3-2-2 and 3-4 are the same.  Two weeks carbonating and 2 weeks conditioning, all at room temp, is the same as 4 weeks.

Some state 2-2-2, meaning 2 weeks fermenting, 2 weeks carbonating, and then 2 weeks conditioning.  While the first "2" could be ok, if the last "2" is in the frig, then no, it's not ok.  You want to be at room temp for the entire period, and 3-4 is the safest method without a hydrometer.

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Recommended formula,  3-4 = 3 weeks in the LBK fermenting and 4 weeks bottle conditioning. The 2-2-2 is Mr Beer's formula 2 fermenting, 2 carbonating and 2 conditioning, which is not completely recommended. Should ferment for 3 weeks if you don't use a hydrometer for OG and FG readings.

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RickBeer said:3-2-2 and 3-4 are the same.  All at room temp.  Since you do nothing different between carbonation (the middle 2) and conditioning (the last 2), we call it 3-4.





Edit - shouldn't have replied early before coffee...  What I meant to say is that 3-2-2 and 3-4 are the same.  Two weeks carbonating and 2 weeks conditioning, all at room temp, is the same as 4 weeks.





Some state 2-2-2, meaning 2 weeks fermenting, 2 weeks carbonating, and then 2 weeks conditioning.  While the first "2" could be ok, if the last "2" is in the frig, then no, it's not ok.  You want to be at room temp for the entire period, and 3-4 is the safest method without a hydrometer.

Thanks for a better explanation of this as I was a little lost on the difference between -3-4, 2-2-2

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Rick, your the man and thank you. I am one of those moons but I have done my research through these forums beforehand. I even have a notebook of notes and advice I picked up throughout the forum but it's nice to have a one stop shop for it all

Thanks again and I can't wait to share the results of my first beer (if only it wasn't still 6 weeks away from being done

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I meant I am one of those noobs* stupid auto correct. Haha haha no nudity you guys are quite entertaining I must say

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As a new Christmas brewer with my first batch going, I am glad you took the time to share this information.  I am going to go with the 3-4 instead of the 2-2-2.  Wish me luck and I have so much more to read!

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HARBAUGH!

No problem, it was actually posted last January. I just bumped it.

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Welcome!

I agree with Rick 100%.

After 50 or so LBKs I still am learning, I still am impatient and try stuff before it is ready but I like to experiment so that is how it goes.

Sometimes I am lucky, sometimes not but in general, following instructions and sanitizing to instructions I have not had anything undrinkable.

Times the flavors have been a bit harsh (e.g. spices or vanilla), I have waited another couple months and they smooth out.

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I have done home brew with all the carboys and apparatus....   and in shop micro brew as well

  for 20 plus years. I kinda know what I am doing. Mr Beer has opened a whole new interest. I am happy I found this ....its going to be fun

 

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Thank you for all of the advice.  My first batch is nearing the three week mark.  I have the 750ml bottles and wad wondering if I should use the carbo drops or sugar?  thank you all again

 

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Thank you for all of the advice.  My first batch is nearing the three week mark.  I have the 750ml bottles and wad wondering if I should use the carbo drops or sugar?  thank you all again

 

Makes absolutely no difference.  Same end result.  

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3) Impatience, tasting before it's ready - Mr. beer recommends less time than those of us that have brewed many batches. 3 - 4 is the general rule of thumb for a reason. It works. 3 weeks fermenting and at least 4 weeks in the bottle (at room temp) generally makes much better beer than a week in the fermenter and/or 2 weeks in the bottle. Fact - green beer tastes like crap. As the Rolling Stones sing, "Time is on my side, yes it is". If you want a hobby where everything is perfect quickly, find another one.

 

 

 

 

I'm following the directions on my first batch, American Light. The directions said that after 2 weeks it is ready. Today is 2 weeks and I tasted the beer. Tasted flat with a slight green apple taste. I was going to bottle tonight or tomorrow. Is this too soon? Was I wrong in tasting it?

 

Michael

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Do what you want. Wait another week and you will be happier.

 

I will do that.

 

Tasting it didn't hurt it? I poured from the spigot, did NOT open the LBK. Put it back in its dark place (an old igloo cooler).

 

That's ok, right?

 

Michael

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Agree. Sanitize before bottling. Shotglass full of sanitizer works nicely.

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hey all,  my first batch is nearing the three week mark. I noticed I have some white floating on top in a couple places>  is that ok?  ank mr beer says to clean lbk with warm water and unscented hand soap

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sometimes too you will have little bits of krausen crud that never settled out.. or got sloshed off the side wall.  wont hurt a thing.

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All i do is read read read. Biggest thing i learned was just make it as is before changing anything. Doing my first bewitched ambe ale now. Then gonna try a tecipe then back to an ipa

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Said well, Rick. For all the noobs, welcome. If you listen and learn, you will be rewarded with beer.

Not just normal beer, but your beer. Nothing tastes better

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Im Leben Geduld ist ein Vorzug. Herein Bierbrauerei Geduld ist eine Voraussetzung
In Life Patience is a Virtue. In Brewing Patience is a Requirement

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Thanks for the tips and encouragement!!!

First time beer brewer..LBK....

 

have set the calendar date for tomorrow to check the brew!!!!   

 

blue_house

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My first batch just got done fermenting for the recommended 2 week mark. I tasted it and like the manual said it tasted like flat beer. No sweet taste. When I started bottling, The first 750ml bottle came out cloudy. I continued to bottle and the rest were good and clear from what I could tell until the last two. I assumed the last were due to the sediment that settled on the bottom of the LBK. 

 

Is cloudiness normal for the first/last bottles of the batch? If not, what should I do to avoid this with my next batch?

 

Thank you

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Thanks for this post.  I had just set up my first batch yesterday.  So far, I'm doing everything exact to the directions.  I already had planned to do 2 weeks in the keg and 3 weeks in the bottles.  I just may extend that as to your advice.  Hopefully, I don't become one of the casualties.  Thanks again..and have fun!  Oh yeah..and I'm doing the Blonde Ale.  It smelled awesome before I put the cover on and parked it.

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Welcome to the community! Love the name! :)

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re cloudiness on first and last bottles --  suggestions.

 

first bottle

-  some trub will have settled in the spigot and comes out into first bottle. I always flush the spigot by open and shut spigot quickly to get that out into a small glass so you can see cloudiness (then taste it to empty the glass), you only need flush about an oz or 2 to get it out. Keep flushing a tablespoon at a time until clearer, but no more than a couple oz.

 

last bottle

- you are getting some of the trub from the bottom of LBK. As you get to the end of bottling, you can take off the lid and look to see when the trub starts to go into the bottles and stop there. On the last bottle I do not prime until I know how full the bottle is - and this is always my early test bottle - maybe 2 weeks into conditioning to see how it is going.

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If you prop the LBK up from the front, you shouldn't have any trub in or near the spigot.

 

My batch of Novacaine had a LOT of stuff in it that I should have strained out when first pouring into the LBK, but I didn't know at the time. The trub was very thick, but I always prop the front of the LBK at least 1/2 an inch while fermenting & cold-crashing, and had a few inches of clear space between the spigot & the front of the trub.

 

 :)

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Long time drinker, first time brewer.  Loving the advice given here!  Just started my first batch last night.  Was going to take it out at 2, but it looks like I'll go for the 3-4 method.

 

I'm sure there is a glossary around here too. I'll use the search function for it.   Would be handy to have so I'm not googling every other word :)

 

edit: NM on the gloassary. Saw it on Rick's signature file   :blink: 

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My first batch (Czech Pils) is in day two of cold crashing.  I tasted a bit at 3 weeks and it was pretty sweet/green apple flavored.  Realizing that in those 21 days I had 2 warm days (no cooler yet) and 6-7 cold days (in cooler with too many ice bottles), I followed The Rick's advice to leave it in the LBK fermenting for an extra week.  Tasted it Sunday....much better; it tasted like beer.  So I'll be bottling it tomorrow night in 750ml PET bottles (using the provided carb drops for my first batch).  

 

For the 4 weeks carb/cond. I'm assuming I should use my cooler with ice water bottles (same temp/system as I fermented).  My Okto-fest just arrived in the mail yesterday and I'm eager to get it down in the LBk.

 

I'd appreciate any more bottling and/or conditioning/carb advice.

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for the 4 weeks of carbonating/conditioning, room temp will be fine.

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Right.  Do NOT leave it in the cooler with ice water bottles.  See The Right Way To Brew in my signature.

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newbie on here. been brewing for about 4 years. just ordered Oktoberfest Lager for the first time. buddy told me I need to 3-3-3 this for it to be the best it can be. overkill or truth? just wondering if anyone has forgotten dates and run long as I often do?

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Honestly, the Oktoberfest will probably be best after 2 to 4 months of bottle conditioning, but it will be drinkable if you go 3-4 (or to break it down, 3-2-2).

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Well said. I have been brewing with mr beer for 3 years and still consider myself a noob.read the forum's ask questions there are alot of experienced brewers here who I have found more than willing to help us all make a great brew.

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Great advice from Rick. We have all been there as new brewers, anxious to try our first brews and ready to begin experimenting. Patience is both the best and hardest piece of advice to follow. For everything except IPA's the more time in the bottle the better. I just found a few Bourbon Oatmeal Stout bottles that I brewed nearly 2 years ago and were buried under my other brews. They are awesome and much better than they were at a month or two in the bottle. I rarely will sample a beer at less than 4 weeks in the bottle, again except for an IPA, which I will try at 2 weeks.

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On ‎1‎/‎20‎/‎2016 at 6:41 AM, RickBeer said:

Bumping this so that new brewers see it.

well I apologize I never read that post, no telling where I would be by now?

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3 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

well I apologize I never read that post, no telling where I would be by now?

 

Less corn kernels in your beer, that's for sure!:lol:

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On ‎9‎/‎19‎/‎2015 at 11:07 PM, slym2none said:

Honestly, the Oktoberfest will probably be best after 2 to 4 months of bottle conditioning, but it will be drinkable if you go 3-4 (or to break it down, 3-2-2).

I haven't checked yet, so I'm going to guess the answer is "yes", but has anyone started a thread of different recipes and the amount of time recommended for each stage?  I didn't know Oktoberfest would be best for that long of conditioning, and if I hadn't read this thread, my first batch next year would have been started too late and not aged enough.

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9 hours ago, MiniYoda said:

I haven't checked yet, so I'm going to guess the answer is "yes", but has anyone started a thread of different recipes and the amount of time recommended for each stage?  I didn't know Oktoberfest would be best for that long of conditioning, and if I hadn't read this thread, my first batch next year would have been started too late and not aged enough.

It's a Märzen, that's March in German. So to be historically correct, brew it in March.

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41 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

It's a Märzen, that's March in German. So to be historically correct, brew it in March.

 

That's one I didn't know.  Thanks for the information.  There is SO much to learn about this hobby.

 

Still would be nice if there was one central local to look this info up

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2 hours ago, MiniYoda said:

 

That's one I didn't know.  Thanks for the information.  There is SO much to learn about this hobby.

 

Still would be nice if there was one central local to look this info up

There is... Google! Just kidding ;) 

Welcome to the hobby! The drinking is the obsession, right @HoppySmile!?

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10 hours ago, Big Sarge said:

There is... Google! Just kidding ;) 

Welcome to the hobby! The drinking is the obsession, right @HoppySmile!?

Oh! Just blame me!!! i'm the fall guy............

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Conditioning my first batch...the weekend is coming...and I really want to try my beer.

 

It's the CAL that the kit came with. I did a 3 week ferment, it tasted flat but great. It's been conditioning for 12 days, the PET bottles are rock hard. If I just took one bottle and put it in the fridge for two days and drank it Sunday would it be awful? I plan to let the batch go for 3-3-2 like I heard was best but....man, the waiting. If I just taste one each week I can test if it gets better!

 

(Is my impatience going to earn me my first strike, Rick?)

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3-4.  4 weeks carb and conditioning, the 3 days in the fridge.

It will lousy, but do it so you learn.   Everyone ignores the recs and proves it...  Waste of beer.

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Would it be awful?  No.

Would you be disappointed?  Oh yes.  

Is it worth it to wait an extra couple of weeks?  Oh yes.

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Sigh....okay, I'll wait.

 

4 weeks minimum* to condition and then three days in the fridge. I can do it. I will be patient....I will be patient...

 

 

*Unlikely I'll drink much at a time so the remainder should be left to continue to condition...for months even and that's okay, right?

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But why the three days in the fridge? Why three days? Won't it be cold in one?

 

And if I condition for 5 weeks + is it always three days in the fridge? Just trying to understand the concept. Or do I have to put all of it the fridge at 4 weeks to kill the yeast, and then I can return it to room temp?

 

(I'm currently in the new and confused stage, someday I will evolve into the wise beer master phase, someday)

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think of everything here as a general guide. 

 

some ppl think chilling a beer for 3 days when 1 would sufficiently chill it, magically makes it 'better' because it allows active yeast to settle out... makes it clearer...etc. it is user preference.  you aren't 'killing the yeast' with cold. you are forcing them to settle to the bottom of the bottle and go to sleep. another thing chilling does is it forces the co2 gas floating atop your beer from carbing ,  to enter solution. in solution, you are less likely to have a gusher when you open it.  with the co2 sitting atop the beer, opening causes the co2 to  rush out ... and drags beer up with it sometimes.

 

myself? I drink room temp beer. I hate how chilling muddles the flavors for me. an ice cold wheat beer taste little different than an ice cold pabst to me. hops get muted. malt gets muddy flavored.   now I take that same wheat beer at room temp and I can taste every hop... the malt shines....    for me I notice the carbonic acid of carbonation more in a cold beer too. I don't like it. albeit very slight, cold beer has an acidic tang to it for me.

 

the 3 weeks ferment, 2 weeks carb, 2 weeks condition is a guide.  lots of new brewers don't have a hydrometer and wonder 'how do I know it is done?'.  most of the time 3 weeks is plenty long for your typical mr beer kits to work their magic and for the yeast to clean up after themselves.  3 weeks helps prevent bottle bombs. if you bottle before the yeast is done .. BOOM.   2 wks to carb at room temp allows the yeast plenty of time to eat the priming sugar.  2 additional weeks gives them time to clean up byproducts from this fermentation too.    see? guides. nothing more.  I have had super fast fermentations that were over and done in 4 days. by giving the yeast extra time, they make better beer.

 

when yeast reproduce and ferment they poop out byproducts: chemicals..esters...  which make potentially icky flavors. after they eat all the sugars in the wort they then eat some or most of these icky compounds. they clean up shop before settling down.

 

we were all where you are now once. give yourself a year and I bet youll be answering questions for the next crop of newbies that come here!

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Only refrigerate what you will drink 3 days later, leaving the rest to continue to condition.  Refrigerator does not kill the yeast, if you remove it and let it warm it starts working again/

 

I suggest you go back and read the first post in this thread, as well as The Right Way to Brew post, they cover your questions in detail.  

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11 hours ago, WisconsinBadger said:

But why the three days in the fridge? Why three days? Won't it be cold in one?

 

And if I condition for 5 weeks + is it always three days in the fridge? Just trying to understand the concept. Or do I have to put all of it the fridge at 4 weeks to kill the yeast, and then I can return it to room temp?

 

(I'm currently in the new and confused stage, someday I will evolve into the wise beer master phase, someday)

 

Yes, it will be cold in one day, but 3 in the cold days allows the Co2 to "lock in" to the liquid. While your beer will be carbonated and cold, sometimes if you drink it too early, it will be flat about halfway through because most of that Co2 has gassed off. Co2 wants to leave the liquid at high temps, which is why your beer will gush if you try to open it at room temps right after carbonation has finished.

 

Of course, this isn't a "set in stone" rule. Depending on the beer, it could be fine to drink after only 12-24 hours in the fridge, but we like to stress 3 days as a general rule of thumb so your beer will at its best.

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17 hours ago, WisconsinBadger said:

But why the three days in the fridge? Why three days? Won't it be cold in one?

 

 

It's a guideline.  I'll often drink mine after only two days.  But I don't mind if my beer is a little cloudy, either, or if I get a little of the stuff from the bottom of the bottle in my glass.

But If I'm pouring for friend or family I let it go three days so the pour is nice and clean.  I can't have them whispering to each other about my cloudy homebrew as soon as I turn my back. :)

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I can take criticism of my brews... but.. if someone was so petty as to say 'ew. cloudy beer.'  that would be their last free sample.   haze has no impact on flavor. . and some beers are actually better because of tossing in the yeast with the pour (wits, hefes).

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After 25 brews with Mr. Beer, I just had my first bottle foamer.  As other people have said, it’s usually due to over-carbonation. 

So others might learn, here’s what happened.

Brewed Mr. Beer’s Baltic Porter exactly by the instructions.  Fermented for 24 days.  Checked with hydrometer and was on target.  (This was my second batch of the Baltic Porter since it was popular among my friends.)  Cold crashed for two days.

Here's the key, I believe:  I used Brewer’s Best tablets for the carbonation sugar during bottling.  I used 4 tablets in each 12 ounce bottle.  According to the Brewer’s Best instructions, that should yield “medium” carbonation.  I’ve used Brewer’s Best tablets with the Octoberfestivus recipe and the Black Moon Weizen recipe and the Amberosia recipe without any problems.  Something about the Baltic Porter resulted in over-carbonation with the Brewer’s Best tablets.  My first batch of Baltic Porter used two Mr. Beer’s carbonation drops for some 750 ml PET bottles and regular sugar (two teaspoons) for other 750 ml bottles.  (I didn't use any 12 oz. glass bottles for that batch.)  The carbonation for that batch was just perfect.

I conditioned the Baltic Porter for 87 days.  Then, placed some bottles in the fridge for 8 days.  The first two that I opened were both foamers.

Both bottles were not just drinkable, but very good tasting.  I just had to pour quickly and let it settle down before drinking.

I’m going to exclusively use plain old sugar from now on.  It works.

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i use sugar cubes. the microdots from domino yield 2 grams of sucrose per cube.  I use a priming calculator based on style guidelines.  if i'm a little under/ over I don't sweat it.

 

example,  I just bottled an ipa. style guidelines was to use approx. 2.5 grams of sugar. I used one cube. a little under...

 

I can drink under-carbed beer.. I cant drink bottles that explode in the extra shower room and end up on the floor and walls.

 

since I drink warm beer I have to open the bottles while they stand in a large salad bowel.  if they gush I can salvage the gushed beer.

 

Ive started using glass again... fingers crossed no bombs.  fg was on target.

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3 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

i use sugar cubes. the microdots from domino yield 2 grams of sucrose per cube.  I use a priming calculator based on style guidelines.  if i'm a little under/ over I don't sweat it.

 

example,  I just bottled an ipa. style guidelines was to use approx. 2.5 grams of sugar. I used one cube. a little under...

 

I can drink under-carbed beer.. I cant drink bottles that explode in the extra shower room and end up on the floor and walls.

 

since I drink warm beer I have to open the bottles while they stand in a large salad bowel.  if they gush I can salvage the gushed beer.

 

Ive started using glass again... fingers crossed no bombs.  fg was on target.

I'm just curious, Zorak.  Can conditioning at excessively warm temperatures also cause a bottle foamer?  I've had wheat beers turn into nothing but foam after 3 days in the fridge and 6 months conditioning (in reverse order, of course); 3 of those months were in the 75-85 degree range (June-August).  

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10 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I'm just curious, Zorak.  Can conditioning at excessively warm temperatures also cause a bottle foamer?  I've had wheat beers turn into nothing but foam after 3 days in the fridge and 6 months conditioning (in reverse order, of course); 3 of those months were in the 75-85 degree range (June-August).  

 

Temperature shouldn't cause this because the amount of Co2 you get is only dependent on the amount of sugar in the bottle. Yeah, it could explode at high enough temps because Co2 is a gas at that point, but once refrigerated, it goes back to its less volatile liquid state. So the temperature that the beer was conditioned shouldn't make it over-carbonated. Over-carbonation is most commonly caused by 1 of 4 things:

 

1. Incomplete fermentation. If the beer wasn't at its final gravity at bottling, it will continue fermenting in the bottle, along with the additional sugar you added.

2. Too much priming sugar.

3. Residual Co2 at bottling. This is another reason why I prefer 3 weeks fermentation to 2 weeks fermentation. During that 3rd week, excess Co2 will off-gas. Without this off-gassing, it would end up in the bottle along with the Co2 created by the added sugar. This can cause over-carbonation.

4. Contamination. Bacteria can also produce Co2 so if you get a contaminated batch, over-carbonation can happen. 

 

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I have also had this problem with Baltic porter before, and other darker stronger brews.

 

I have a Baltic Porter fermenting now - it was with  S_05 yeast - fermenting around 63-65 deg. and supposedly that yeast is happy there and 3 weeks should be enough.

I measured the BRIX at start and after 21 days. 15.6 (OG 1.064) to start and 8.8 (FG 1.017) after 21 days. Using the online calc. this works out to ABV of 5.9 so it has not done yet.

Needs to go to BRIX 8.3 (FG 1.013) for ABV of 6.5.

The behavior wrt krausen etc. seemed ok, still small bubbles on top.

I moved it into warmer room and shook it up a bit to circulate yeast.

Now there is a good area of active bubbles on the surface - not 100% covered but the middle 2/3 is covered.

 

I will let it go another week and check again.

 

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You should not go another week.  You should check it 48 hours after the last check.  If it has not moved, it's done.

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On 5/27/2015 at 5:59 AM, Nickfixit said:

re cloudiness on first and last bottles --  suggestions.

 

first bottle

-  some trub will have settled in the spigot and comes out into first bottle. I always flush the spigot by open and shut spigot quickly to get that out into a small glass so you can see cloudiness (then taste it to empty the glass), you only need flush about an oz or 2 to get it out. Keep flushing a tablespoon at a time until clearer, but no more than a couple oz.

 

last bottle

- you are getting some of the trub from the bottom of LBK. As you get to the end of bottling, you can take off the lid and look to see when the trub starts to go into the bottles and stop there. On the last bottle I do not prime until I know how full the bottle is - and this is always my early test bottle - maybe 2 weeks into conditioning to see how it is going.


I can't get over how friendly you all are. you long time Brewers know the little tricks and aren't afraid to trade your secrets just to keep good beer brewing. thanks for that advice. I'm going to do that with my 1st batch. Put it in the LBK on August 21, 2017 the day of the Eclipse. and it will be 3 weeks on September 11, hoping to bottle that day . I'm calling it my Eclipse Ale. I sure hope it turns out  as nice as the people in this community!

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5 minutes ago, Darthvin said:


I can't get over how friendly you all are. you long time Brewers know the little tricks and aren't afraid to trade your secrets just to keep good beer brewing. thanks for that advice. I'm going to do that with my 1st batch. Put it in the LBK on August 21, 2017 the day of the Eclipse. and it will be 3 weeks on September 11, hoping to bottle that day . I'm calling it my Eclipse Ale. I sure hope it turns out  as nice as the people in this community!

Great brew name!

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