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When is bottling fermentation done?

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Hello,

    First time home brewer, first time poster here.

Today is seven days since I bottled my first beer batch with the sugar.  So, am I looking for anything to tell me when this fermentation is complete?  The instructions just said seven days, then into the fridge.  But should I still see sugar at the bottom of the bottles?

Just eager to get these suckers chilled and to start drinking them, then onto my next batch (an Oatmeal Stout!).

O'Reilly

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You should wait 4 weeks in the bottle, not the 1 week suggested by the instructions.  The beer will be better each week.  some people try one early, but it will be better if you let it go longer.  The stuff at the bottom of the bottle is called trub.  When you poor it into a glass, try to do it slowly so the trub stays in the bottle.

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Thanks!

i joined the forum to ask my question before reading other threads.  The resounding theme is to wait 3-4 weeks, so I will.   Small priced to pay for better beer.  I may drink one now just to experience it and to compare it with the four week stuff.

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I find that beer keeps conditioning even after 6 months. I have home brews that keeps getting better month after month. In fact I had my last Octoberfest that was a year old. After I finished it, I wish I had waited a whole year to start drinking my Octoberfest.

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a lot of new brewers rush to taste the beer. mr beer's instructions lead them to believe that they will have awesome beer in one week. this isn't the case. then when they taste it and it tastes like fruity cider they get discouraged and put their kits in the attic.


will you have beer in one week? yes.


will it be good beer? no.


PATIENCE grasshopper! after you bottle, allow it TWO weeks to carbonate and then...wait for it... give it another 2 weeks to allow the beer to condition. THEN chill and enjoy.


a really really good experiment for noobs: after you bottle and give it 2 weeks to carb, chill one bottle only. taste it.  then after another week chill another bottle. taste it. then after another week chill another bottle and taste it and so on.


you should see that the beer goes from cidery at first to more like beer... to really good... to outstanding to... oops.. no more beer. use your early batches to learn and experiment... document everything with notes so you can see how doing this or that impacts your final product.


 


have fun!


 

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waiting gets easier if you build up a pipeline... ie after making a bunch of batches. the trick is to actually build it up without drinking them all as fast as you make them. :)

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Zorak made several good points, the most important one being that patience is rewarded with good beer. I would say that a few weeks of bottle conditioning at room temperature can be the difference between awesome and awful. The nice thing about developing a pipeline is that you can compare beers and drink what you're in the mood for, offer friends whatever best fits their tastes, and learn about the styles. The only down side is that I find that my weight and a sense of responsibility limit how much I can drink. 

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O'Reilly said:I may drink one now just to experience it and to compare it with the four week stuff.

   I actually encourage you to try one at 1 week.  Write down your impressions.  Then try one at 4.  I suspect you'll become a true believer that 4 weeks conditioning is the minimum.  There just isn't any better way to learn than by doing, and this is an easy way to experience just how different beer tastes after it ages.  Have fun.

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