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nct35

Anybody done an India Pale Lager? Not much info on this one...

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Hi all,


I received the Turncoat IPL recipe as a birthday gift-- I have only brewed a single batch of the Czech Pilsner with great success.  The IPL is quite the jump from the simplicity of the Pilsner! I have the batch started and am maintaining a good temperature (10-13C) from what the recipe calls-- I am planning to ferment for 3 weeks with a slight increase in temp the last 3 days or so. 


 My question is: do I continue and bottle this batch,  and "lager" it at a lower temperature (true lager) for 4 weeks, or do I treat it like an ale and let the bottles sit at the yeast fermenting temperature?  I've read that the hop character can be diminished if lagering is carried out too long, such as with the said 4 weeks-- but then again, there isn't too much info on this that I can find.  Any input here would be most appreciated!

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When bottling lager beer, the ideal is to continue to keep it in the same fermentation range as it was prior (10-13C). It should be kept at this temperature for no less than 2 weeks, and more ideally about 30 days, before the bottles can be stored and aged at refrigerator temp. There are some who prefer to actually store the bottles at room temperature to speed up the process. This can be done without too much risk of off flavors (lager yeast can produce excessive sulfury flavors at room temp) since the bulk of fermentation has already past. Though, there is a slight risk of changing the flavor the beer (that's why it is okay, but not ideal).

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Thanks for the input- I think I was leaning towards keeping the bottling temp the same as the fermentation temp as you mentioned.  From what I've gathered, if I keep the bottles closer to room temp considering the lager yeast used, there could be chance for off flavors.  Time is certainly a factor and it will be very difficult not to drink this batch too early. I just needed some confirmation I guess-- 

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I know, it is tempting to enjoy your bottles before it is prime, but patience truly is a virtue in this situation! I like to say it is the one unmentioned vital ingredient in a brew.

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THIS QUESTION IS SIMPLY TO INCREASE MY GENERAL KNOWLEDGE OF THE HISTORY OF BEER-MAKING.

 

I'VE SEEN A LOT POSTS REGARDING IPAs, TO ALMOST MAKE ONE THINK THAT INDIA WAS A HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT REGARDING BEER-MAKING AS WAS EUROPE.  I HAD NEVER EVEN HEARD OF AN IPA AS A CLASS OF BEER UNTIL I STARTED READING THIS FORUM.   I WAS ALWAYS UNDER THE IMPRESSION THAT EUROPE WAS THE HISTORICAL BIRTHPLACE OF BEER AND BEER MAKING PROCESSES.  I WAS NEVER AWARE THAT INDIA POSSIBLY RIVALLED EUROPE TO THE POINT WHERE IPAs WAS AN ENTIRE CLASSIFICATION OF BEER UNTO ITSELF.  

 

IS THAT THE CASE?   IS MY UNDERSTANDING CORRECT OR INCORRECT?

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the story is the English made a really hoppy beer that could survive the trip 'round the horn to India so the "lads" could have a taste of home.

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But this thread was actually about a different, colder brewed version.

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the story is the English made a really hoppy beer that could survive the trip 'round the horn to India so the "lads" could have a taste of home.

THANX FOR THAT BIT OF INFORMATION.

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