Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Skimbleshanks

AG Weizenbock

Recommended Posts

I'm going to shoot for an All Grain Weizenbock (using inspirations from a few recipes I saw on here (thank you Foothiller)) in my LBK. I'm going to shoot for the following:

3lbs Wheat Malt (Using Red)

2.5lbs of Munich Malt

10.5oz of Vienna Malt

4oz Chocolate Malt

1oz Hallertau @ 30mins

1 Pack of Weihenstephan Weizen (Wyeast Labs #3068)

Est OG - 1.076

22.9 IBU

22.6 SRM

7.8% ABV

It'll be a BIAB. Going to start with 2-gallons of water and mash for a little under 90 mins. Followed by a sparge to bring it back over 2 gallons (~2.5). Boiled 60 mins. Hallertau at 30mins - 4.5%.

My questions start with the yeast. It's a liquid pack and 100 billion cells. Using the estimated OG, the yeast calcs I've checked still say a lil over 100 billion needed. However, on a bunch of recipes and youtube videos it's saying that the packs can handle over 5-gal batches. Is this too much yeast to pitch it all? Will my LBK be overflowing? I'm going to be fermenting in my basement laboratory in the high 60's (degrees F). Anything I should change?

If all goes according to plan I'll be testing this out in a day or two.

Feedback is appreciated! Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jumping right in, I see.  I had good results with my version if this.  Your IBU are lower than mine, and mine was quite malty, so be prepared for a malty brew.  Many people who do 5-gallon batches use a starter in addition to the smack-pack, so the smack-pack by itself is not overpitching.  I used the whole smack-pack with no starter in addition.  I limit my batch sizes in the LBK to about 2.25 gallons, and have had krausen on the roof of the keg once or twice, but never an overflow.  Good luck, keep good notes for future reference, and let us know how this works out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assuming you end up with a 2.13 gallon batch of wort at 1.074, and are shooting for 0.75 million cells per mil per degree plato, which is the kind of catch all (but not exclusive!) suggested pitching rate for ales that I believe Whitelab suggests, then you would need about 108 billion yeast cells. this makes you just about 8 billion cells short of the *suggested catch all* priming rate. I wouldn't worry one bit about it - you're in the ball park. Also, a lower pitching rate encourages more yeast growth, which means more production of fruity esters. That is why some breweries often suggest underpitching for your wheat beers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a sidenote, I once did an experiment with pitching rates for a Saison I made. I made roughly 10 gallons of the same wort, split it in half. In one batch, I pitched a single vial of Saison Blend yeast from White labs, and in the other I pitched the same type of yeast vial (same age) that was grown from a starter. The wort that the starter built up yeast was pitched into would be the theoretical "proper pitching rate" batch. Both came out well, but the proper pitched batch was cleaner and somewhat less complex in comparison to the "underpitched" batch. The "underpitched" was much more spicy, clovy, fruity, and basically more of what a saison should be. In my opinion and many others opinion, the underpitched was far better. So, you know, don't go chasing waterfalls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies! 

Foothiller, thank you again for originally posting your recipe. AG and PM recipes for LBK's seem to elude me. I took out half a pound of wheat and left out the melanoiden - which contributed to the lower ABV. The only brew shop I've been able to find within a hundred miles reminds me of someone's garage or a hoarder's bedroom with a little shelf of pre-measured specialty grains and very limited stock on anything else. (Why I couldn't find melanoiden.)

Following recipes like yours helps me learn about different grains and what they are doing to my brews. They are just hard to find, and I'm not bold enough yet to take 5 gallon ones and batch-size-change them. I do have Beersmith 2 and qbrew. I think this sort of thing will keep me happy for quite awhile - then once I've got all these LBK's out of my system I'll start moving up.

Sam, I'm excited to see what a yeast like this does.. should be fun to watch - might even do a time lapse video of it for youtube.

I'll be brewing this up tomorrow at some point and will post many pictures.

Thank you all again! See you tomorrow with detailed updates!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scaling a 5-gallon recipe down to the LBK can actually be easy:  half of 5 gallons is 2.5, which is not far off of the 2.25 gallons that I usually shoot for.  Just dividing everything by 2 and brewing 2.25 gallons is close enough for most purposes.  (You're welcome, I hope your result is as good as mine.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alrighty, I've got some questions. I brewed this up the other night, didn't quite get the high OG as I'd hoped but it was just over 1.070. Fermentation seemed very slow/quiet. Earlier today (about 40 hours after pitching) the fermentation seemed to be going strong. There was a delightful smell of bananas and alcohol in my basement (about 69F ambient). I just went down to check on it, when I noticed that nearly all the Krausen was gone (only had about a half inch that I ever saw of VERY thick creamy Krausen - looked like bubbling pancake batter on a griddle.) Bubbling appears to have stopped almost completely at 48 hours in.

I took a gravity reading - came out to 1.020 which was the estimated final gravity. I'll wait another day or two to see if it changes any further. Is it possible that fermentation could have been completed so quickly? If so, why?

I tasted the gravity sample - had a pleasant odor and tasted very nice. It had a lot of warmth to it with the ABV content. 

Before pitching

0b86aef5-dbc4-48e1-b771-9c641fc43ab5.jpg

The mash

cf972d43-c872-4860-9d68-015a934c4b1d.jpg

Will keep updated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It definitely could have finished that quickly.  My current brett saison went from 1.074 to 1.007 in a week, but I'm pretty convinced that that reading would have been the same at 48-72 hours as well.  Some yeasts and some fermentations just rock it quickly, while others take their sweet time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I brewed my Weizenbock, I didn't take a frequent series of refractometer readings like I often do, but as Swenocha notes, some brews take off quickly.  My record is a Belgian, using Wyeast 3522 Ardennes yeast, when I first made a low gravity (low calorie) Belgian pale ale for my wife, then pitched a 1.060 wort directly on the yeast cake.  It reached 84% attenuation in 3 days.  But full attenuation does not mean the beer is done, since the yeast then need to clean up various initial byproducts.  I bottled a Munich Dunkel last night, which has brewed in the LBK for 3 weeks at 63 F, starting at OG=1.051 using S-23 yeast.  It reached its FG=1.014 within a week, but I could still taste a trace of cidery acetaldehyde.  I'm sure this will condition out, but it shows the beer was not finished at the end of that first week. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good thing I waited a little longer. I just bottled and got a bottomed out FG reading of a whopping 1.014 (just under) for an ABV of around 7.5%. The taste was nice, roasty, toasty, and wheaty. Smell was of course wonderful. Time to see what conditioning will do.9cd9ad43-e64a-46a5-8009-a55d563a6745.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my good golly Moses. I've already consumed a few other crafties tonight - a porter, weizenbock, hefe, etc.. and so I decided to try one of the Weizenbocks I made. (Only a little over a week conditioning) I poured and the photo below is what I got. (I know, it's a crappy glass, but all my other good ones are in the dishwasher.) It poured with a good head, a few fingers thick that lasted nearly 5 mins. The smell was wonderful, a nice roasty aroma.

My biggest fear was that it would taste burnt.. like a crummy porter. I took a swig. Unbelievable. It was so incredibly smooth and delicious. The flavor was like drinking an alcoholic chocolate icecream malt or shake with yummy roasty flavors to follow. The banana and clove flavors are there just enough - and a hint of those Hallertau hops to finish. Unbelievably awesome brew. Better than any I have ever bought in this style. My second batch ever created - all grain. I am shocked I am getting such quality a little over a week into bottling. I CANNOT wait until a few more weeks from now - can't imagine how much better this can get. I will happily be brewing this again soon. As soon as one of the 4 LBK's are done with their respective batches. Extremely extremely happy here. I just want to share it with everyone I see. Phenomenal.

8317517b-b301-4efe-a2a7-8f93abe9995b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...