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rrgarvey

Spring Dobblebock with ALE yeast

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Just wondering if anyone has tried brewing the Dobblebock with an Ale yeast instead of the provided lager.

You know for anyone who doesnt wanna maintain the lager temperature.

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Apparently no one has the specific experience that you're asking about.  What I can suggest is that to get as close as possible to the lager character, you would want to use a yeast that is "clean" as possible.  An 11-gram packet of Fermentis Safale US-05 might be your best choice. 

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If you have a place you can get liquid yeast from you may want to try a California Common like Wyeast WP2112 or White Labs WLP001.  Another choice may be a Kolsch yeast.  Perhaps someone from MrB could chime in if they have tried it.  Finding a user who has tried this may be difficult as the seasonal just came out and there hasnt been a lot of time to brew, condition, and try it at this point.

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The S-23 lager yeast that comes with the dopplebock can ferment at temps up to 71 F.  I've used it a couple times in the mid to upper 60's to make some really good kolsch style beers.  Even at higher than optimal temps it still makes a pretty clean beer.  As long as you can at least keep it somewhere in the 60's during fermentation you'll still get a good beer, it just won't be a lager and you can treat it like any other ale yeast.  

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thanx for the info, now I also heard that Nottingham Ale yeast could be a good yeast to use because its temps are for 57 - 70 something and can produce "lager like" beers here what my ocal brew websites descriptiong of the yeast is:

"Nottingham -- A very versatile dry ale yeast. Great performance all the way through fermentation and able to cover a wide variety of beer styles. The Nottingham strain was selected for it's high flocculation and near full attenuation properties. Produces low concentrations of fruity and estery aromas. Described as a neutral ale yeast which allows for full natural flavour of hops and malt to shine through.

Recommended fermentation temperature range between 14 to 21C (57 to 70F), with good tolerance to low fermentation temperatures (12C/54F) which also allows this strain to produce lager-style beer. Higher alcohol tolerance great for the creation of higher-alcohol specialty beers. The all-around dry ale yeast."

would this be a good replacement?

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