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TorBrewer

WB-06 Yeast / Fermentation time question

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Hello fellow brewers!

I recently ventured out and tried making a Hefeweissbier from other extracts after trying our the "Who's your Hefe?" recipe and had a couple of questions for brewers who've tried out the Fermentis WB-06 yeast:

1.) It is normal for the WB-06 to ferment quickly? I recently did an all extract brew with this yeast and found that it had attenuated to the recipe target FG in 9 days and flocculated significantly! The only reason I noticed the whole flocculation bit is because I have a second LBK going in the earlier stages of fermenting with WB-06 and I was able to compare wort clarity side by side. 

2.) Its day 11 at this point and I've gotten the same reading (1.010) that i got on day 9, should I even consider bottling or wait 3 more days?  

Many thanks in advance for the assistance!

Cheers,

TorBrewer

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After your beer reaches FG, the yeast are still cleaning up their initial byproducts, which happens best with continued contact with the yeast cake in the fermenter.  The common advice to wait 3 weeks before bottling also applies to WB-06. 

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@Foothiller: 

Thanks for the answer; would you recommend still going the 3 / 2 / 2 (or 3/4) week route with WB-06 / a Hefeweizen?

Cheers,

TorBrewer

P.S. I wanted to add that the hydro sample was pretty awesome. My favourite commercial hefe is Weihenstephaner and this sample tasted pretty darn close. The brew was at 23.5-24C for 3 days and then gradually brought down to 20-21 for the rest of the days. 

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I would stick to the commonly recommended 3 weeks in the LBK for fermenting, to allow the yeast enough time to reduce flavors that you don't want and develop the flavors that you do want.  As for time for carbonating and conditioning, if it were my brew I would stll not call it done until 4 weeks, unless the taste changed my mind, but I need to describe how my own practice works out in reality, and acknowledge that hefeweizen is an exception in being ready early and maybe passing its peak early. When I bottle, the first and last couple go in plastic as early sample trub bottles, and the rest in glass.  After 50 regular batches plus about as many small test batches, I still get curious about my beer's progress, so I drink one trub bottle per week.  I have enough inventory that the glass goes at about one per week too, rotating among the inventory.  So in practice, you could call the hefeweizen done whenever it tastes right. 

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@Foothiller:

Thanks once again for the answers; I also usually do a taste every week (leaving me with not a lot of the end product) but find it gives me a good picture of what where my brews are heading.

Now that you answered my questions, I've got more for you XD:

1.) How long do you suggest keeping them in the fridge for before you test bottles? 3 days or a week? I've been doing 3 days at 4C for my tester bottles and a full week for the finished stuff I plan on drinking. I found that US-05 seems be ok at 3 days but the Mr Beer Fromunda yeast needs a full week before the yeast profile really settles down. 

2.) With regards to priming sugar amounts; what do you recommend for a hefe? I've found that the mr beer recommend amounts with dextrose seem to be actually pretty good to my tastes but have found that commercial beers are slightly more carbonated (1tsp per 500ml).

Cheers,

TorBrewer

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For me, a bottle is 12 oz, so 2-3 test bottles during the 4 weeks of carbonating & conditioning doesn't put a big dent in the 24-25 bottles that I get from the LBK.  "Plastic" for the first & last of them means used Coke bottles. 

For your questions, this might be less insightful than you'd hope.  It often amazes me what happens to all the space in our fridge, but the space I have to cool bottles is on the shelves of the door.  I give them a minimum of 2 days, but after a few days I think the yeast gets stirred up by opening & closing the door, affecting the flavor.  For good recommendations on pitching amounts, look through the calculators on screwybrewer.com -- there can be several variables involved. 

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@Foothiller:

You sir are a gentleman and a scholar; I oddly never thought of using smaller or plastic bottles for my testers and have subsequently purchased some Fruli for my family members to enjoy and plan to re-use the 250ml bottles for trubbies / testers!  I too suffer from an over filled fridge so the coldest room (the cold storage area with a temp of 7-11C) has to suffice for my poor attempt as making the beer cold before space is available in the fridge.

Cheers,

TorBrewer 

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I taught a friend how to homebrew and we used a very simple hef recipe. It was in primary for 10 days then straight to bottles for about 5 days. It tasted good, just like a standard hef. There was even a decent banana/ phenol aroma to it with the wb-06.  Hefs are better young. I chill the bottles in the fridge as long as it takes to get to serving temp.

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