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DavidVBarbour

Porter has a harsh and yeasty taste

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My second brew was with the American Porter kit.  The beer has a yeasty taste.  I've already bottled it.  I'm hoping with more time it will get better.  It also has high CO2 content. 


To fix this, should I just keep it in my refrigerator for a while, or would it condition better at room temperature?


What should I have done differently?  I'm inclined to think I added too much sugar when bottling.  I used the recommended amount.


Thanks,


David


 

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Most of us go 3-4. 3 weeks fermenting at room temp, 4 weeks conditioning at room temp. Then, only put in the fridge what you're going to drink in 3 days, let the rest keep conditioning.

As far as carbonation, part of what you're seeing is due to too little time in the conditioning phase at room temp. Also, many of us put in less sugar - around 65 - 75% of Mr. Beer's recommendation. When you progress, you can use the calculator at www.screwybrewer.com and figure out more exactly how much sugar to use.

Make sure you pour SLOWLY. You'll see the stream start to get cloudy. That's when you stop, which should be with about 1/4 inch left in the bottle. You can also put a CD/DVD case or two under the front of the LBK while it's fermenting, and while you bottle, which will keep the trub back from the spigot. Finally, you can put the entire LBK in the fridge for a few days, with the front propped up, and the trub will get thick (and the beer will settle out and be clearer). "Cold crashing" will make the trub move like molasses when you fill your bottles, so you'll eek out the last little bit and not get any trub. 

FYI,  posting in the MUG section of the forum isn't ideal.  

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A darker beer will often have a "harsher" flavor before it is aged than a lighter beer. The darker roasted malts can take a while to smooth out and often need at a minimum a few months aging. For your first batches feel free to taste occasionally. When you have tasted your fresh and aged beers you won't need to ask what all this talk about aging means. Some beers are fine or great young, most are better with some aging, some need aging. Darker and higher alcohol  beers would be prime candidates for longer aging.

I would guess RickBeer is on target with making sure the beer is fully fermented and fully carbonated before putting it in the fridge as well as the possibility of stirring up the trub while you are bottling.

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