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RogueChip

Cleaning labels off of glass bottles

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Hello all,

I am a glass bottle person - the plastic works, but somehow to me feels "cheap." No offense meant to all of you who use plastic and are happy with it, but they're just not for me. As my mother likes to say, "That's why there's chocolate and vanilla."

Anyway, there is a particular22-ounceaa73192e-dff3-4677-ad6b-799e3fe529f5.jpg bottle shape that I like. It's used by Redhook Brewery and the beers inside are pretty good so it's no big deal buying (and drinking)  their beer and saving the bottle. The problem is, the labels that they use are glued on so well they have been a real bear to get off ... until last night. Up until now, I have tried soaking overnight in hot soapy water, using commercial oil-based "Goof-Off" type cleaners, and even just scraping them off with a razor blade. The razor blade worked the best but it was a real pain and I went through a single-edge blade for every three or four bottles.

Last night I tried using One-Step cleaner. I soaked the bottle for about 2-3 minutes, the label peeled off easily, and the glue wiped off with a plastic scouring pad.  As a bonus, it also cleaned the old beer gunk out of the bottle. I cleaned three dozen bottles in the time it would have taken to razor-scrape a quarter of that, and they came out shining!

I heartily recommend One-Step cleaner!

Chip Weinert

On the banks of Oregon's Rogue River

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I wonder if a solution of Oxyclean will do the same as the One-Step? I give it a go later this week and let you know.

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Oxiclean Free is what most recommend, removes labels and cleans the bottle.  The only ones I had issues with were Short's, but I don't want their bottles anyway.

 

One concern in using oil-based things like Goo-Gone is to ensure that NONE of it gets in the bottle at any time.  

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I too use "Free" and seems in most cases to work like a champ.  The bottles I have the best luck with are Sam Adams, not that I have had to remove labels in quite some time now that my collection has reached critical mass.

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I use the plastic MB bottles just because I haven't bought a capper yet. I've saved plenty of bottles, mainly Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada. Most of those bottles are still wearing their labels though, so this is helpful.

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Might want to reconsider the 22 oz as well.  12 oz works best for a single "Homebrew Pour" into a single glass.  Bigger than that and you'll be drinking way too many of your yeastie friends.

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While a 22 oz isn't ideal for one person, I find that the bigger bottles are good for when you have friends over.  Pour one, leave the bottle tilted, fill another, etc.  

 

I also find that if I pour one and put it back in the frig it settles just fine.

 

I have 12, 16, 16.9 and 33.8 oz bottles.  Would love some 22s.

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One concern in using oil-based things like Goo-Gone is to ensure that NONE of it gets in the bottle at any time.  

 

Your comment here just made me think that perhaps it's best if using a cleaner to get the label and glue off to do it while the bottle still has the cap on and the beer inside.  This would assure that none of it gets inside the bottle.

 

I've gotten labels off empty bottles just using water and the dull side of a table knife.  Often there will be a little glue residue still on the bottle, but I haven't worried about it.  I just make sure that none of that water gets inside the bottle.

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Here's what I do (not that this is the perfect way, it's just what I do).

 

I accumulate bottles by getting them from friends, or I place a Craigslist ad offering to meet people in the grocery store parking lot and pay them the bottle deposit so they don't have to stand at the machine in the store.  Usually you can find someone with several cases.  First time I did it I got 7 cases from two people, then a homebrewer traded me for moving boxes I had for sale, and then gave me the rest of his collection since he was just going to dump it.  I currently have beer in 11.8 cases of beer (mostly glass, but not all) and I have 5 more cases (including plastic) of clean bottles, and 3 cases of bottles that need to be cleaned (which I won't clean until I need them).

 

When I need bottles, I clean several cases at once, not worth the effort of cleaning a few.  I put very hot water in a Rubbermaid tub.  I lay the bottles down and let them fill them up (have to push on the neck to hold it down to fill) and make sure that when all the bottles are filled (my tub fits about 12) that the water covers them up completely.  I let them soak about 15 minutes.

 

Then I come back in and remove bottles, one at a time.  The labels either already fell off or are falling off.  I pick them out of the water and toss them.  I take a sponge and use the rough side and rub the entire outside of the bottle including the neck. I then dump the water out put the bottle into another tub full of a solution of Oxiclean FREE ($7 - 8 for 3 lbs at your grocery store) and very hot water.  By doing this two-step label removal process, all the glue residue remains in the first tub and stays out of your bottles.  I added that first step after seeing very yellow water from all the glue and deciding to try adding a step.

 

 I then insert the bottle into a 5 gallon bucket still full (mostly) of the solution.  I do this until I have 1/2 dozen in the bucket.  Then I put 6 more in the tub.

 

I take the 6 in the bucket and one by one I use a bottle brush to scrub the inside.  I then dump the solution from the bottle back into the tub and put the bottle in my laundry sink.  I do this for all six, and when done I make sure that the new six bottles in the Rubbermaid tub are submerged (they won't be until you dump the full bottles back in).

 

For the 6 in the sink, I now use my jet bottle washer to blast the bottle with very hot water (remember to NOT do this with plastic bottles, just glass).  I hold the next bottle underneath the washout pointed down so it gets rinsed on the outside.  I then swap bottles.  When done, I put them on my bottle tree and do the next two.  When all 6 are done, I repeat the cycle working on the second 6 that have now been soaking in the Rubbermaid tub for a while.

 

As the liquid cools I take a break. I pour some into a plastic microwaveable spaghetti container.  I microwave it on high for 10 minutes, and dump it into the Rubbermaid tub.  I make sure to do this before it gets too cool, as hot water works best in the process.  If you let the whole tub get too cool, when you go to heat it back up by the time you get the last of it heated the initial reheated part is cool again.  By the way, this cleans the wife's spaghetti pot so well she is overjoyed.  

 

As I said, I do this for a few cases at a time, because it's a lot of work.  I don't worry about the label glue getting in the bottle as it is very diluted, and I blast the bottle with hot water while it's still wet.  If a bottle fails inspection after they dry, I do it once more (or the next time).  If it doesn't get clean in two tries, I recycle it, not worth the work.   

 

For bottles that have my beer in them, after I pour them I dump out the remaining trub, fill them with hot water (warm for PET bottles), shake, and dump again.  Then I fill them 1/2 way, put one drop of unscented dish soap in them, and shake with my hand over the top.  Dump into the next bottle, then rinse repeatedly with hot water until clean.  Rarely does this not result in a perfectly clean bottle.  If I don't have the time to do this (i.e. company), I dump the trub out, fill it once water and dump it again, then fill it all the way to the top and let it sit on the counter or in the sink.  All the way ensures nothing dries.  

 

Hope this helps some.  Note the links are to show examples, you should be able to get a bottle brush for under $4, a jet bottle washer for under $10, and a bottle tree for under $20 that holds 45 bottles.  

 

I store the water in a bucket, and then the next day when I'm ready to do more bottles I heat it up in my brew pot to 140.  Dump it in, put in the first bottles, then rinse my brew pot (so the soap doesn't dry on it) and start all over.

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Shlafly is one of my favorites for label removal. Sam Adams are great too. That said, there are some that get tossed since I don't want to go to the effort.

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Other than screw-off bottles, are there any bottles you would not recommend?

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Short's uses an adhesive that must have been developed for the space program, it's not water soluble.

 

And of course use brown bottles - no green or clear.

 

Sam Adams are good as stated.

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I use multiple vessels, like Rick. But, since I use Five Star PBW, it cleans the bottles while the labels slip right off. Then I just scrub them with an ordinary dish towel to remove any residual glue (usually nine to very little left at this point) then transfer them to clean rinse water. I might use a bottle brush if I'm in doubt, but rarely am. That stuff works great! Five Star Powdered Brewery Wash is definitely worth every penny. It also is great for stuck on dried Krausen that you often find at the top of your fermenting vessel.

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Hello all,

I am a glass bottle person - the plastic works, but somehow to me feels "cheap." No offense meant to all of you who use plastic and are happy with it, but they're just not for me. As my mother likes to say, "That's why there's chocolate and vanilla."

Anyway, there is a particular22-ounceaa73192e-dff3-4677-ad6b-799e3fe529f5.jpg bottle shape that I like. It's used by Redhook Brewery and the beers inside are pretty good so it's no big deal buying (and drinking)  their beer and saving the bottle. The problem is, the labels that they use are glued on so well they have been a real bear to get off ... until last night. Up until now, I have tried soaking overnight in hot soapy water, using commercial oil-based "Goof-Off" type cleaners, and even just scraping them off with a razor blade. The razor blade worked the best but it was a real pain and I went through a single-edge blade for every three or four bottles.

Last night I tried using One-Step cleaner. I soaked the bottle for about 2-3 minutes, the label peeled off easily, and the glue wiped off with a plastic scouring pad.  As a bonus, it also cleaned the old beer gunk out of the bottle. I cleaned three dozen bottles in the time it would have taken to razor-scrape a quarter of that, and they came out shining!

I heartily recommend One-Step cleaner!

Chip Weinert

On the banks of Oregon's Rogue River

The One-Step and our No-Rinse are the same thing. ;)

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The One-Step and our No-Rinse are the same thing. ;)

 

The secret's out, the secret's out!  

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Short's uses an adhesive that must have been developed for the space program, it's not water soluble.

 

And of course use brown bottles - no green or clear.

 

Sam Adams are good as stated.

why not green? one of the few decent non-twist top i have up here is steam whistle which is a very dark green so i can't see light penetration being a problem

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why not green? one of the few decent non-twist top i have up here is steam whistle which is a very dark green so i can't see light penetration being a problem

 

Suit yourself.  

 

 skunky beer is called “lightstruck” by chemists and beer nerds, and this is why you’ll often find odoriferous brews in clear or green bottles. Brown bottles block much more light and are a far superior vessel for beer

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why not green? one of the few decent non-twist top i have up here is steam whistle which is a very dark green so i can't see light penetration being a problem

I've used green 20oz and green 2L bottles for my beer.  No problems at all.  You have to be really careful about sunlight though.

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why not green? one of the few decent non-twist top i have up here is steam whistle which is a very dark green so i can't see light penetration being a problem

Has to do with the red coloring in the brown deflecting UV. Which green don't, regardless to how dark it is. In the FWIW department, brown bottles only buy you seconds @ full sunlight. Having said that, I'm a Brown bottle man

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On 11/18/2014 at 2:28 AM, RickBeer said:

Oxiclean Free is what most recommend, removes labels and cleans the bottle.  The only ones I had issues with were Short's, but I don't want their bottles anyway.

 

One concern in using oil-based things like Goo-Gone is to ensure that NONE of it gets in the bottle at any time.  

Does this also sanitize the bottles? New to brewing, looking for pros/cons of glass vs plastic. 

 

Also, thanks for being such an awesome resource! It was a great help to find your page. 

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Oxiclean Free is laundry detergent. Soap. Cleans, does not sanitize.  You need to rinse well. 

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I just save my bottles up until I have  bunch, then use the leftover No Rinse from MrB to soak the bottles in. It takes most glues & turns them into easily-rinsed-off mush.

 

:)

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On 11/18/2014 at 0:38 PM, Da Yooper said:

I too use "Free" and seems in most cases to work like a champ.  The bottles I have the best luck with are Sam Adams, not that I have had to remove labels in quite some time now that my collection has reached critical mass.

 

I also will buy Sam Adams beer when I'm in need of bottles. The labels will almost fall off with just hot tap water and a drop of two of soap. After the labels come off I clean the outside with a sponge and more soap, rinse them inside and out really well, let them dry and clean and sanitize when I'm ready to bottle. Angry Orchard Hard Cider and Saranac bottles also delable well. 

 

On 11/18/2014 at 3:20 PM, epete28 said:

I use the plastic MB bottles just because I haven't bought a capper yet. I've saved plenty of bottles, mainly Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada. Most of those bottles are still wearing their labels though, so this is helpful.

 

Search eBay for vintage bottle cappers. Works just as well as a newer one at a fraction of the cost. 

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There is no sin for using green pop off bottles, I have a case of Heineken bottles but the label seems forever stuck, I remember there was no label and the image was cast in.

Had plenty of Sam Adams over the holidays, The labels were ready to peel while drinking.

I use a plan like Rick Beer kind of like an assembly line with the exception of the sink. I installed a 3/4 bung fitting on our master bath roman tub. I can sit while working as well. You have to work around your living space to find the best method but Git Er Dun. so to speak.

 

My 2 cents, M

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Using green bottles IS a sin, unless you're careful to keep them out of the light. The green color blocks UV rays about as well as clear bottles. Why do you think Heineken, Becks, Mickey's, etc. all have a skunky flavor/aroma? Because anything but brown bottles is a sin. ;)

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2 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

Using green bottles IS a sin, unless you're careful to keep them out of the light. The green color blocks UV rays about as well as clear bottles. Why do you think Heineken, Becks, Mickey's, etc. all have a skunky flavor/aroma? Because anything but brown bottles is a sin. ;)

 

You beat me to the punch. The only difference is that I was going to say that using green bottles isn't a sin, just a mistake.

 

Unless you like that skunk smell, that is.

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I have a few of the green bottles, however after bottling I store all my bottled beer in a closet until I drink them and when I'm ready I almost always leave in fridge until I open to drink the beer.

 

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I've been saving my Sam Adams bottles also,besides I need to drink something while I wait for my brew to ferment.......... Oh the agony!!!!!!!!!

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How does one sanitize glass bottles when you can't put a top on it to shake it up and let it sit for 10 to shake again?  I was thinking to soak in a bath.  

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1 hour ago, BBinNJ said:

How does one sanitize glass bottles when you can't put a top on it to shake it up and let it sit for 10 to shake again?  I was thinking to soak in a bath.  

 

What I do, and what I believe is standard, is to wash the bottle out, fill halfway with whatever sanitation you use, then just put your clean hand on top, shake it up, let sit for 10 minutes, repeat with a clean hand, dump. I haven't had any off flavors or infections from doing this. 

 

Take it with a grain of salt, however, as I am in no way an expert! 

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Trying to figure how to reply.  Let's give this a go.  

 

Thanks ill give it the old clean hand....method.  Almost said something I think you folks would be teasing me about for a long time.

 

Bob

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On ‎1‎/‎22‎/‎2016 at 7:59 PM, MRB Josh R said:

Using green bottles IS a sin, unless you're careful to keep them out of the light. The green color blocks UV rays about as well as clear bottles. Why do you think Heineken, Becks, Mickey's, etc. all have a skunky flavor/aroma? Because anything but brown bottles is a sin. ;)

 

I suppose the "etc." includes Rolling Rock (OMG, that stuff is horrible!  If that were the only beer available to drink, I would be stone cold sober all the time) and Schoenling's Little Kings Cream Ale.  I'm sorry to admit that I drank my fair share of Little Kings many, many years ago.  Hey, we were all young and stupid at one point. 

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9 hours ago, rugercaptain said:

 

I suppose the "etc." includes Rolling Rock (OMG, that stuff is horrible

Rolling Rock has become my buddies and my fishing beer of choice. I think the sweet taste of disappointment is a metaphor for our fishing... 

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17 hours ago, BBinNJ said:

How does one sanitize glass bottles when you can't put a top on it to shake it up and let it sit for 10 to shake again?  I was thinking to soak in a bath.  

I just set a cap on it, hold it with my thumb and then shake it and leave it set for 10min or so. I leave that cap with the bottle and then use it when I've filled it with beer later after draining the sanitizer from it. It's not too hard and seems to work fine.

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10 minutes ago, TonyKZ1 said:

I just set a cap on it, hold it with my thumb and then shake it and leave it set for 10min or so. I leave that cap with the bottle and then use it when I've filled it with beer later after draining the sanitizer from it. It's not too hard and seems to work fine.

I do the same as Tony when I use glass.  also I invert the bottle and let a little bit drain out to wet all the cap. I do this with PET bottles also.

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On ‎1‎/‎22‎/‎2016 at 7:59 PM, MRB Josh R said:

Using green bottles IS a sin, unless you're careful to keep them out of the light. The green color blocks UV rays about as well as clear bottles. Why do you think Heineken, Becks, Mickey's, etc. all have a skunky flavor/aroma? Because anything but brown bottles is a sin. ;)

Funny part is, over the years people have come to believe those beers are supposed to taste like that!

On ‎1‎/‎22‎/‎2016 at 10:16 AM, John1801 said:

I have a few of the green bottles, however after bottling I store all my bottled beer in a closet until I drink them and when I'm ready I almost always leave in fridge until I open to drink the beer.

 

Do a quick Google on skunky beer. I did some reading and was shocked as to how quickly light can start to have an effect. One site suggested that it takes only 10 minutes to notice a difference in flavor in certain settings, such as out on your deck in full sun. I haven't tried it yet, be interesting to know.

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1 hour ago, Neverbrewedadarnthing said:

Funny part is, over the years people have come to believe those beers are supposed to taste like that!

 

Yes, this is unfortunately so true. It has become a desired flavor for many people so these breweries purposefully lightstrike their beers. I get a lot of people wanting to know how they can make the Aztec Cerveza taste more like Corona. I tell them to put it in clear bottles and leave it in the sun for an hour. lol.

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22 hours ago, BBinNJ said:

How does one sanitize glass bottles when you can't put a top on it to shake it up and let it sit for 10 to shake again?  I was thinking to soak in a bath.  

I pour some sanitizer into a bowl and place a number of caps (several more than the number of bottles I'll be filling, in case of errors) into it.  When bottling I use a clean gallon milk jug to prepare the sanitizer, making sure the cap gets sanitized as well.  Fill each bottle halfway, place the sanitized milk jug cap over it, and give it a good shaking/swishing/inverting to make sure the sanitizer reaches everywhere.  Then drain and move onto the next, rinsing the jug cap with a bit of fresh sanitizer.  Then it's add sugar, fill from the LBK, cap with sanitized cap.  Repeat this final step 11 more times and voila!  

 

This works for me.  YMMV. 

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You find your process. I start by trying to make sure my bottles are as clean as can be after I drink from them. Super hot water rinse. (Hot enough that it hurts to hold the bottle....glass of course.) Then a fill with soap and a lot of shaking. If they have labels then a long soak to soften the labels and remove them. A scrub of the outside. Another hot water rinse/shake to get the soap out.

 

On bottling day...another HOT water rinse and shake. Caps soak in sanitizer. Then I 3/4 fill a bottle. Hold a cap on in and shake the snoopy out of it. Pour to another bottle. A new cap...shake the snoopy.....and so on and so.

 

Then before I begin adding sugar I do one go through of draining each bottle before adding sugar/priming drops.

 

While we are on the subject...I know it is not bottles...but in the spirit of sanitation...I rinse my bottling wand parts in warm/hottish water. I soak them in some whiskey and pour some whiskey through the tube. I wipe down the spigot with some whiskey. Then I re-rinse everything and rinse it with sanitizer and wipe it down again. 

 

Is this overkill? It feels like it is......It feels like it is even more than overkill....it feels like I am counteracting everything.

 

But I really like the smell of whiskey.....

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I guess I've been lucky b/c I don't use any soap at all.  When I'm done drinking the store bought beer I rinse the bottle with warm water until the odor of beer is gone, fill the bottle and the sink with hot water, soak until the water gets cool, scrape the labels off with the back of a butter knife, wipe the glue off with the rough side of a dish cleaning sponge, re-rinse, and then dry them either in the dish strainer or upside down on a clean dish towel.  On the day that I'm going to use them I rinse once and then follow the Mr. Beer instructions to sanitizing them.  

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7 hours ago, MrWhy said:

While we are on the subject...I know it is not bottles...but in the spirit of sanitation...I rinse my bottling wand parts in warm/hottish water. I soak them in some whiskey and pour some whiskey through the tube. I wipe down the spigot with some whiskey. Then I re-rinse everything and rinse it with sanitizer and wipe it down again. 

 

Is this overkill? It feels like it is......It feels like it is even more than overkill....it feels like I am counteracting everything.

 

But I really like the smell of whiskey.....

I like using Bourbon instead, and my process is a bit different. I typically put the bourbon into a glass, and while holding the wand in one hand, pour the bourbon into my mouth and dunk the wand in the sanitizer. Then, I operate the foot valve in the sanitizer while swallowing the bourbon.

 

It's always good to hear other people's process!

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14 hours ago, RickBeer said:

The whiskey is adding nothing mm over just using sanitizer...

 

In my head the whiskey is just ensuring that everything is clean and then the sanitizing is sanitizing it all. I guess whiskey is my soap.

 

I know it makes no objective sense...but subjectively I am working with the "it cannot be sanitized if it is not clean" principle I invented.
 

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Most labels will come off just by soaking them in warm water for a few minutes.  The ones that are plastic and peel off will leave a glue residue that can be easily removed by spraying a little Goo Gone on them.

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I was going to start a new thread, but will see if this question gets any traction in here first.

 

I am saving 16.9 oz. pop (soda) bottles for my Hard Cider. The labels on those are plastic, do a complete wrap around the bottle, and are glued at the seam only. The rest of the label just falls off. The seam glue they use is tough stuff. Soaking the bottles doesn't doo much good and I am reluctant to use a solvent because of the plastic bottle. Does anyone have any thoughts on how to get it off?   

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3 minutes ago, Neverbrewedadarnthing said:

I was going to start a new thread, but will see if this question gets any traction in here first.

 

I am saving 16.9 oz. pop (soda) bottles for my Hard Cider. The labels on those are plastic, do a complete wrap around the bottle, and are glued at the seam only. The rest of the label just falls off. The seam glue they use is tough stuff. Soaking the bottles doesn't doo much good and I am reluctant to use a solvent because of the plastic bottle. Does anyone have any thoughts on how to get it off?   

Sounds just like a bottle I'm used to. Remove the easy part, scrape and scrub the edges. I bought this but I don't dare use it on my LBK because the bristles are quite tough

 

https://libman.com/products/54/

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try soaking in sanitizer and warm water ,,it worked pretty good on regular labels for me..

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1 hour ago, Neverbrewedadarnthing said:

I was going to start a new thread, but will see if this question gets any traction in here first.

 

I am saving 16.9 oz. pop (soda) bottles for my Hard Cider. The labels on those are plastic, do a complete wrap around the bottle, and are glued at the seam only. The rest of the label just falls off. The seam glue they use is tough stuff. Soaking the bottles doesn't doo much good and I am reluctant to use a solvent because of the plastic bottle. Does anyone have any thoughts on how to get it off?   

the glue that is used on plastic soda bottles does not break down in water.  It will soften, but not come off.  you need a solvent cleaner or something relatively powerful to remove that.  there are certain glass bottles that use a similar glue, but with glass, you can use a scouring pad or harder bristles to physically remove the glue.  

 

Using something like Goo Gone will work, and as long as you keep it on the outside you should be fine.  Goo Gone is listed as safe for plastics, and following up with a regular cleaning with dish soap and/or sanitizer should remove any possible residue.  The solvent won't hurt the plastic any more drastically than the plastic will break down on its own.

 

beyond that, scouring pad or Brillo pad..  yeah, they will scratch the plastic, but plastic bottles don't last forever anyway.  

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Thanks. I had thought of Goo Gone but wasn't sure how the plastic would react to it. I think I'll give it a try and let the bottles set for a few days just to see what happens.

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Cleaned used bottles today. Mostly followed @RickBeer ‘s advice. Cleaned 50 bottles today. Used hot water soak to remove labels. Wanted to mention what bottles were the most friendly to home brewers trying to remove labels. This is not comprehensive, but just my top 4. 

 

1. Odell’s-hands down the most friendly. Label practically fell off in the water. 

 

2. Sam Adams-after a soak just took a light scrape and it all came off. 

 

3. Sierra Nevada-came right off after a soak

 

4. Paulaner-came off so easy. 

 

Honorable mention: deschuttes, real ale brewing, revolver (easy to peel off plastic label), modelo.

 

Had a few that were literally impossible. Some use plastic labels and probably requires a solvent of some type to remove the glue. Just gave up or left the label on. Won’t buy those again. 

 

After label removal, filled up sink with oxy clean free and hot water for another soak. Shook the poop out of them and rinsed with hot water and hung on my new bottle tree. Ready to rock. I have to admit I did calculate what my time is worth professionally vs saving $50 in not buying 2 cases of new glass. Much less satisfying buying online. Plus I do love working on anything beer related. 

 

Jdub

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I soak them overnight in bath with hot as I can get water.

Next day some fall off, most others can be scraped off with putty knife and residue removed with Dobie scourer.

Very few except plasticky ones do not work that way for me 

 

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10 hours ago, Jdub said:

Cleaned used bottles today. Mostly followed @RickBeer ‘s advice. Cleaned 50 bottles today. Used hot water soak to remove labels. Wanted to mention what bottles were the most friendly to home brewers trying to remove labels. This is not comprehensive, but just my top 4. 

 

1. Odell’s-hands down the most friendly. Label practically fell off in the water. 

 

2. Sam Adams-after a soak just took a light scrape and it all came off. 

 

3. Sierra Nevada-came right off after a soak

 

4. Paulaner-came off so easy. 

 

Honorable mention: deschuttes, real ale brewing, revolver (easy to peel off plastic label), modelo.

 

Had a few that were literally impossible. Some use plastic labels and probably requires a solvent of some type to remove the glue. Just gave up or left the label on. Won’t buy those again. 

 

After label removal, filled up sink with oxy clean free and hot water for another soak. Shook the poop out of them and rinsed with hot water and hung on my new bottle tree. Ready to rock. I have to admit I did calculate what my time is worth professionally vs saving $50 in not buying 2 cases of new glass. Much less satisfying buying online. Plus I do love working on anything beer related. 

 

Jdub

Might want to check your modelo's as they might use a different bell size, i think thats the term, than the US beers. I know Dos Equis do and won't cap with my MB hand capper. Lol, I do love my Dos Equis, but switched to Devils Backbone vienna lager a couple months ago to build up a supply.

I just soak my DB bottles in hot water and unscented 7th gen dish soap. In four hours most peel right off, especially if i hold them under some hot running water while removing.

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My favorite are the Sam Adams bottles, the others on your list seem to work good too. But there's been a few that just refuse to come off. I use hot water with either a strong solution of one-step or a laundry soap mixture. I usually leave them in the bucket a day or two. I then rinse them a couple times and put them on my bottle tree to dry.

Edited by TonyKZ1
was informed that it's laundry soap not detergent.
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Be wary of using anything with a scent, i.e. laundry detergent.  Oxi-clean FREE has no scent.  

 

One step may work, but it's wasteful to use it since you don't need any sanitizing.

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Thanks, it's a homemade laundry soap (washing soda, borax) mixture with no fragrance added. The wife also adds our goat milk soap to that for the laundry, but I just use those two ingredients. I've looked for the oxi-clean free in local stores, but haven't found it yet.

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@Cato thanks. Did not know that about modelos. Never thought to try it. Will try to cap one today. I only have about 4-6 in the bunch. I have a couple of bottling days coming up and needed to get the bottles going. 

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2 hours ago, Cato said:

Might want to check your modelo's as they might use a different bell size, i think thats the term, than the US beers. I know Dos Equis do and won't cap with my MB hand capper. Lol, I do love my Dos Equis, but switched to Devils Backbone vienna lager a couple months ago to build up a supply.

I just soak my DB bottles in hot water and unscented 7th gen dish soap. In four hours most peel right off, especially if i hold them under some hot running water while removing.

It was bugging me so I just went and capped a negra modelo bottle. No leaks and seemed to fit ok. 

 

I hear ya on the devils backbone. I’ll look out for that beer here. I find myself only buying beers that I can reuse the bottle. 

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2 hours ago, Cato said:

Might want to check your modelo's as they might use a different bell size, i think thats the term, than the US beers. I know Dos Equis do and won't cap with my MB hand capper. Lol, I do love my Dos Equis, but switched to Devils Backbone vienna lager a couple months ago to build up a supply.

I just soak my DB bottles in hot water and unscented 7th gen dish soap. In four hours most peel right off, especially if i hold them under some hot running water while removing.

 

The issue is not that they need a different bell size, it's that some non-US beers have a different size cap, which requires both that cap size and a different size bell.  European caps are 29mm, while US are 26mm.  

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6 minutes ago, Jdub said:

It was bugging me so I just went and capped a negra modelo bottle. No leaks and seemed to fit ok. 

 

I hear ya on the devils backbone. I’ll look out for that beer here. I find myself only buying beers that I can reuse the bottle. 

Cool, I for some reason thought Dos Equis and Negra Modelo were produced by the same company, but after Googling they are not. Glad that the Negra Modelo capped okay and I'll have to add them back into my okay to buy list!!

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3 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

 

The issue is not that they need a different bell size, it's that some non-US beers have a different size cap, which requires both that cap size and a different size bell.  European caps are 29mm, while US are 26mm.  

Ah, thanks for clarifying that Rickbeer! Makes perfect sense though just like tap and dies must match.

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5 minutes ago, Cato said:

Cool, I for some reason thought Dos Equis and Negra Modelo were produced by the same company, but after Googling they are not. Glad that the Negra Modelo capped okay and I'll have to add them back into my okay to buy list!!

I bought a 4 pack of IPA’s at Costco recently partly for the beer but mostly for the cool 22 oz bottles. The labels were plastic and glued on with something impossible to get off. I gave up. Did enjoy the beer though...

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On 4/22/2018 at 8:52 AM, RickBeer said:

 

The issue is not that they need a different bell size, it's that some non-US beers have a different size cap, which requires both that cap size and a different size bell.  European caps are 29mm, while US are 26mm.  

I de-labeled and cleaned about 70 bottles today. I had a couple of paulaner bottles. Tried to cap them and it didn’t work. You’re right about the euro bottles. Bells, odell, lagunitas, Sierra Nevada, Sam Adams, real ale (local), and most craft brews’ labels come right off after a soak. Just a few names based on what I’ve been drinking. 

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