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Bassman

Mixing in Bottle Priming Sugar

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How fanatical do I need to be about making sure that there is no non-disolved sugar at the bottom of my PET bottles? I find that even after turning the bottles over a few times the sugar remains. I end up doing a few turn overs after capping, then a few more a after clean up. It's definitely sugar and not trub. 

 

Am I over mixing and is that a bad thing for my beer?

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I've noticed this too.  It happens when I use the PET bottles, but not glass bottles. The first time I used these bottles I used carb drops and they dissolved quickly.

 

Three days ago I bottled a batch using sugar and I checked them after reading your post and the sugar is still sitting on the bottom.  Turned one bottle up a couple of times and it still doesn't dissolve.  My hope is that in time the beer will consume the sugar and carbonate, otherwise I'm going to have flat beer with gunk in the bottom of the bottle.

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Not had this problem I use PET bottle and also have used glass. I use the 0.5g sugar dots (cubes) for carbonating, put them in before the beer and then after capping just upend them a few times before storing for carbonation and maturation. I use 0.5 per 12 oz, 3 per 750 ml and 5 per 1 L and it seems to work fine.

I would not think it will affect the beer if you mix it up, as long as anything has time to settle before pouring.

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I only do the upending at bottling. I'm letting them condition for a month and then a week in the fridge. 

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You are overmixing.  Upend it once.  Gently.  That's it.  They yeast will find it.  Too much and you risk aerating the beer.

 

Also, what looks like sugar later in the carbonating/conditioning phase is trub, i.e. dead yeast byproducts, not sugar.  If you don't have trub (i.e. "gunk") at the bottom of your bottle after this phase, you have a real problem.

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The yeast will find and consume the sugar. I don't even invert the bottles, and have not had any problems. Enjoy a brew while you contemplate how good the next batch will taste!  ;)

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You are overmixing.  Upend it once.  Gently.  That's it.  They yeast will find it.  Too much and you risk aerating the beer.

 

Also, what looks like sugar later in the carbonating/conditioning phase is trub, i.e. dead yeast byproducts, not sugar.  If you don't have trub (i.e. "gunk") at the bottom of your bottle after this phase, you have a real problem.

Thanks for this tip!  I usually upend gently two or three times to be sure, and never thought about the potential drawback.  Will remember this in the future.

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What Brian said.  Think of it this way - for those who use carb drops it is essentially a blob of sugar sitting at the bottom of the bottle.  Yeast are like hungry puppies - they will find their food.  It may just take a little longer.

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They are taking FOREVER in my Pear Cider. I am even thinking of adding some more fresh yeast to the bottles. I need this carbonated for Christmas.

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The yeast will find and consume the sugar. I don't even invert the bottles, and have not had any problems. Enjoy a brew while you contemplate how good the next batch will taste!  ;)

 

The main reason I invert the bottles is to make sure there are no leaks. Otherwise I don't believe it's necessary.

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Try batch priming... its easier than you think. Screwys site will give you the amounts, and you can make a cheap bottling bucket buy getting a 5 gal #2 from Home Depot ( NOT THE ORANGE ONES,check the white ones in the paint dept.). Drill a hole in the side near the bottom, and insert an extra MrBeer spigot, being sure you have it high enough to sit on a flat surface.

Some on here don't like buying #2's from a big box store, and believe you should pay 3X the money from a beer supply store, but I have been using these, not only for a bottling bucket, but also as secondaries, with the matching #2 cover, drilled out for an airlock.

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Some on here don't like buying #2's from a big box store, and believe you should pay 3X the money from a beer supply store, but I have been using these, not only for a bottling bucket, but also as secondaries, with the matching #2 cover, drilled out for an airlock.

I think pretty much all of us don't mind the big box pails, but 5 gallons will only allow you to ferment 3.5-4 gallons of beer rather than the traditional 5-5.5.  Also, if using it as a secondary for a LBK sized batch there is a lot of head space (ie oxygen) to contend with.  But, it is fairly easy to scale a recipe for either a LBK or 5 gallon sized to fit.

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