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SweetLuu

Belgian recipes

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I'm trying my hand at brewing two Belgian beers tomorrow. I chose recipes that keep the alcohol in the range I like, but other than that I was wondering what any of the Belgian experts, like SiriusDG think of these brews and what the flavor profiles might be like.

Farmhouse Ale and Witbier are the only Belgian styles I've tasted, so this is a total experiment.

#1 HOOSONFURST ABBEY SINGEL (2.13 gallon)
IBU: 34, SRM: 10, ABV: 4.5%
6.4 oz. Crystal 10L
6.4 oz. Belgian Aromatic Malt
1.75 lb. Extra-Light DME
0.3 oz. Challenger (60min)
0.4 oz. Saaz (30min)
1/3 tsp. Irish Moss (15min)
0.2 oz. Hallertauer (5min)
0.2 oz. Saaz (5min)
Wyeast's 1762 Belgian Abbey Ale II yeast
Prime with 1.6 oz. Corn Sugar

#2 WITKAP-PATER ABBEY SINGLE ALE (2.13 gallon)
IBU: 23, SRM: 6, ABV: 5.8%
3.2 oz. CaraPils
1.5 lb. Extra-Light DME
1.4 lb. can Alexander's Pale Extract
3.2 oz. Belgian Clear Candi Sugar
0.6 oz. Styrian Goldings (60min)
0.1 oz. Saaz (15min)
0.2 oz. Sweet Orange Peel (15min)
1/4 tsp. Ground Coriander (15min)
1/3 tsp. Lemon Peel (15min)
1/3 tsp. Irish Moss (15min)
0.2 oz. Sweet Orange Peel (5min)
Wyeast's 1762 Belgian Abbey Ale II yeast
Prime with 0.8 oz. Corn Sugar & 0.8 oz. Clear Candi Sugar


I'm brewing them both at the same time so I can split one yeast pouch between the two.

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Ummm, well...since I have not yet strayed far from MB ingredients with DME and Hop Adds, this is a little outside my box, but...

Generally, they both look fine. I think the second is going to be much better, and more true to style, because of the sugar and spice, which are common components to belgians.

Belgians are also not commonly heavily hopped; however, you are not using any HME at all -- this is also something else I have not done, and don't have a good feel for how much hops you need to replace an HME, but belgians are not commonly heavily hopped, so keep that in mind. Your choice of hops I think is proper though.

Let us know how they turn out!

David

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I know there are many liquid yeasts that fit the Belgian style, but I do not care for the liquid yeasts. Is there a dry yeast that would be in the Belgian style?

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There are two that I use. SafeBrew S-33, this is not specifically belgian, but is a high grav yeast that supposedly has a higher ester profile than standard, and so is advertized to be good for belgian, trappist, and wheat beers, as well as any other specialty or high grav ale. I use it a lot and like it.

Also, SafeBrew T-58, which is specifically a belgian yeast. It is in my keg for the first time right now. Kicked off to a fabulous start, I will keep you posted on the results.

I also hate liquid yeasts, almost all my experiences with them has been very negative. Probably my own fault, but stickin with what works for now.

David

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SiriusDG wrote:

There are two that I use. SafeBrew S-33, this is not specifically belgian, but is a high grav yeast that supposedly has a higher ester profile than standard, and so is advertized to be good for belgian, trappist, and wheat beers, as well as any other specialty or high grav ale. I use it a lot and like it.

Also, SafeBrew T-58, which is specifically a belgian yeast. It is in my keg for the first time right now. Kicked off to a fabulous start, I will keep you posted on the results.

I also hate liquid yeasts, almost all my experiences with them has been very negative. Probably my own fault, but stickin with what works for now.

David

I have a T-58 sachet in the fridge now. I could not decide on a purpose for it, now I know.

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SiriusDG wrote:

Belgians are also not commonly heavily hopped; however, you are not using any HME at all -- this is also something else I have not done, and don't have a good feel for how much hops you need to replace an HME, but belgians are not commonly heavily hopped, so keep that in mind. Your choice of hops I think is proper though.

I didn't think these recipes WERE heavily hopped?

What is a typical IBU for a Belgian Singel?

Do you think I should tweak the hops on the first one to get the IBU's under 30?

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Interesting. I hit the web sites for three of my faves, and they don't even list the ibu. Maybe that says something about what they think of it. Don't know what to say here.

I have one brewing now that is 16 IBU with OG of 1.100.

My standard is 12 IBU, with OG of 1.073.

The Reverend, a favorite from Avery, is a Quadruple ale, but it is 10 IBU with an OG of 1.106.

I suppose most everyone is choking at this point, but hey, it is what it is.

BTW, I am not saying yours ARE too hoppy...just that I am not sure, since you are not using an HME, what the hop add to balance that out would be, and you should at least keep it in mind.

David

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I had information for Northdown for my stats on Hoosonfurst, but am substituting Hallertauer which has a lower AA%. With that adjustment and decreasing the amount of Challenger from 0.3 oz to 0.2 oz. that brings the IBU calculation down to 25.

I feel good about 25.... Although not a single, Chimay Red is IBU 25. I've never tasted Chimay personally, but it seems popular enough.


There's a trendy Belgium pub I recently read about here in Philly. I'm going to have to stop in for some Moules Frites and a few samples of beer.

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SweetLuu wrote:

I had information for Northdown for my stats on Hoosonfurst, but am substituting Hallertauer which has a lower AA%. With that adjustment and decreasing the amount of Challenger from 0.3 oz to 0.2 oz. that brings the IBU calculation down to 25.

I feel good about 25.... Although not a single, Chimay Red is IBU 25. I've never tasted Chimay personally, but it seems popular enough.


There's a trendy Belgium pub I recently read about here in Philly. I'm going to have to stop in for some Moules Frites and a few samples of beer.

Researching the style. A homebrewers work is never done. :)

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Okay, I just took the 5 day taste test on my current brew with the T-58, just before tossing in the hops for dry hopping...VERY impressed. I really taste the Belgian character coming through already. While not nearly as clear as S-04, it is also not as cloudy as S-05. This may be a new favorite very quickly, as it really has more of a belgian character than the S-33 I more commonly use for these.

And, in case your curious, here is what I put it in...

Delphi's Oracle
---------------
Brewer: David Gilbert
Style: Belgian Specialty Ale
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.100 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 16 IBU
Recipe Color: 16° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.025
Alcohol by Volume: 9.7%
Alcohol by Weight: 7.6%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.44 lb, Sugar, Other
Candi Sugar, Clear (Belgian) 0.88 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Bewitched Red Ale 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Booster 0.40 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Mellow Amber UME 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract

MrB. Bewitched Red Ale 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
Saaz 1.00 oz, Pellet, 1 minutes

Corriander Seed 0.50 unit, Spice, 1/2 tsp Crushed Corriander, boiled with the sugars

David

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Dave,
I have only used the T-58 in the Witty Monk but it fermented the keg with vigor. I never got the 'peppery' flavors the datasheet described but the batch of beer was gone in no time. It was a young but ready recipe.

Good luck with this one, dude. How are you going to prime? You ready for the extended lagering? Let us know how it goes next summer when you crack one...

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SweetLuu wrote:

I'm trying my hand at brewing two Belgian beers tomorrow. I chose recipes that keep the alcohol in the range I like, but other than that I was wondering what any of the Belgian experts, like SiriusDG think of these brews and what the flavor profiles might be like.

Farmhouse Ale and Witbier are the only Belgian styles I've tasted, so this is a total experiment.

#1 HOOSONFURST ABBEY SINGEL (2.13 gallon)
IBU: 34, SRM: 10, ABV: 4.5%
6.4 oz. Crystal 10L
6.4 oz. Belgian Aromatic Malt
1.75 lb. Extra-Light DME
0.3 oz. Challenger (60min)
0.4 oz. Saaz (30min)
1/3 tsp. Irish Moss (15min)
0.2 oz. Hallertauer (5min)
0.2 oz. Saaz (5min)
Wyeast's 1762 Belgian Abbey Ale II yeast
Prime with 1.6 oz. Corn Sugar

#2 WITKAP-PATER ABBEY SINGLE ALE (2.13 gallon)
IBU: 23, SRM: 6, ABV: 5.8%
3.2 oz. CaraPils
1.5 lb. Extra-Light DME
1.4 lb. can Alexander's Pale Extract
3.2 oz. Belgian Clear Candi Sugar
0.6 oz. Styrian Goldings (60min)
0.1 oz. Saaz (15min)
0.2 oz. Sweet Orange Peel (15min)
1/4 tsp. Ground Coriander (15min)
1/3 tsp. Lemon Peel (15min)
1/3 tsp. Irish Moss (15min)
0.2 oz. Sweet Orange Peel (5min)
Wyeast's 1762 Belgian Abbey Ale II yeast
Prime with 0.8 oz. Corn Sugar & 0.8 oz. Clear Candi Sugar


I'm brewing them both at the same time so I can split one yeast pouch between the two.

Sweetluu,
I have been curious about the Alexander's pale extract is it the 1.4 lb Kicker? Have you used it before how does it compare to MrB ume?

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I used T-58 awhile back in FIRE IN THE HOLE CHILI BEER. Can't tell if the yeast made any difference in that one with 9 jalapenos.

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SiriusDG wrote:

Okay, I just took the 5 day taste test on my current brew with the T-58, just before tossing in the hops for dry hopping...VERY impressed. I really taste the Belgian character coming through already. While not nearly as clear as S-04, it is also not as cloudy as S-05. This may be a new favorite very quickly, as it really has more of a belgian character than the S-33 I more commonly use for these.

And, in case your curious, here is what I put it in...

Delphi's Oracle
---------------
Brewer: David Gilbert
Style: Belgian Specialty Ale
Batch: 2.13 galExtract

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.100 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 16 IBU
Recipe Color: 16° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.025
Alcohol by Volume: 9.7%
Alcohol by Weight: 7.6%

Ingredients
-----------
Brown Sugar, Light 0.44 lb, Sugar, Other
Candi Sugar, Clear (Belgian) 0.88 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Bewitched Red Ale 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Booster 0.40 lb, Sugar, Other
MrB. Mellow Amber UME 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract
MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.21 lb, Extract, Extract

MrB. Bewitched Red Ale 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
MrB. Octoberfest Vienna Lager 1.00 oz, Pellet, 5 minutes
Saaz 1.00 oz, Pellet, 1 minutes

Corriander Seed 0.50 unit, Spice, 1/2 tsp Crushed Corriander, boiled with the sugars

David

David,
Once again I am curious. Is the Saaz true to type? If it is, it is another coincidence, because I have some in the freezer. What if any flavors did the T-58 add or eliminate?

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I am going more for the bubble gum esthers and fruitines than the pepperyness, and it is there.

As for priming and aging, I expect I will prime this with dextrose, although I need to get a bottle of Nostradomus, the inspiration for this, to investigate a few finer points of body and foam, to try and get the priming, and possible final addition of lactose, proper. I have this on schedule for 45 days of aging. I really don't see anything here that needs excessive aging. My still evolving opinion on this is that anything in a can of HME has pretty much blended out already, so unless you add something raw like spices or hops, massive aging is not really required. This is not to say that it cannot age longer, or that it will not mellow more over time; just that it is not necessary, and if you like the way it tastes, then drink it! ;)

David

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I brewed these two beers on Sunday. This was the first time I did two side by side batches where I steeped grains in both. It required two extra pots and a little finesse around the kitchen, but all in all a success.

I kept all of the ingredients for the pot on the left burner on the counter left of the stove, and all the ingredients for the pot on the right burner on the counter right of the stove, so I wouldn't accidently throw something in the wrong pot!

Making four gallons at once is going to free me up to spent more of my home time with my family. It was either that or get up at 5:00am to brew and I like my sleep too much for that!

The krausen was an inch thick Monday morning, and now on Tuesday morning it's still chugging away 1/2 inch thick.

I can't wait to taste if there is any difference with flavor from the liquid yeast. Although, I like the ease of dry yeast it's pretty tasteless. I've been using S-04, US-05, WB-06, & K-97 for more than 60 brews.... It was time to step it up.

Other than waiting for the pouch to swell, I didn't find using liquid yeast to be any more difficult than the dry & the price can be justified by brewing double batches and eyeballing half the yeast in each.

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I've had a couple Hoosonfurst Abbey Singel's and I like this style. This style is supposed to be everyday "table beer" in the monestary, hence the lower alcohol than a lot of other Belgians.

I'm not sure if the unique flavor I get is coming from the Abbey II yeast or the Belgian Aromatic malt (probably both), but it's subtley different than other golden ales I've made.

Too much bitterness for my wife, but way less bitterness than a Czech Pilsner.

I love it.

It's hard to sip this one. When the nose... then initial taste hit the tongue it screams "Guzzle Me!".

Great lacing on this one too. Sorry for not posting a pic. Maybe I'll have one tonight and photograph it.

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Took a taste of my Big Belgian today (bottling tomorrow) and it's gonna be kick ass (about 8.14 ABV). Started out at 1.094 and was estimated to hit 1.025 but the yeast retired from the field with honor at 1.032. It clarified nicely to a mid-amber or even red and has just the slightest hop taste and then a late bitter that is already calming the alcohol. Once carbed I think this is gonna be a go to brew.

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SweetLu...if you're in the Philly area and like Belgians...check out Eulogy Bar...its down in Old City near Penn's Landing...right across the street from a Triumph Brewery Pub too...don't remember the exact street though...enjoy.

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Kaz wrote:

SweetLu...if you're in the Philly area and like Belgians...check out Eulogy Bar...its down in Old City near Penn's Landing...right across the street from a Triumph Brewery Pub too...don't remember the exact street though...enjoy.

First of all, thank you for the tip. Eulogy & Triumph are on Chestnut St. Most of the brews at Eulogy are big brews (high alcohol) which is typical of a lot of Belgian beers. The reason why I wanted to do a singel is because I like beer with ABV around 3.5%-5.5%.

A lot of the brewers on this forum like Big Belgian brews and should check out Eulogy if they ever come visit to see the Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross House, Ben Franklin's Gravesite, etc. It's down in that area of the city.

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SweetLuu wrote:

Kaz wrote:

SweetLu...if you're in the Philly area and like Belgians...check out Eulogy Bar...its down in Old City near Penn's Landing...right across the street from a Triumph Brewery Pub too...don't remember the exact street though...enjoy.

First of all, thank you for the tip. Eulogy & Triumph are on Chestnut St. Most of the brews at Eulogy are big brews (high alcohol) which is typical of a lot of Belgian beers. The reason why I wanted to do a singel is because I like beer with ABV around 3.5%-5.5%.

A lot of the brewers on this forum like Big Belgian brews and should check out Eulogy if they ever come visit to see the Liberty Bell, Betsy Ross House, Ben Franklin's Gravesite, etc. It's down in that area of the city.

That's all in Phillie? Damn. I thought it was in EPCOT.

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Hello everyone!

Tonight I'm making my version of Abbey Dubbel. I have Octoberfest Vienna Lager, Creamy Brown UME, Saaz hops, 1/4 cup brown sugar. I also have white Belgian candy sugar. Does anyone know how much I should add? Do I add it straight to the boil? Also, I have some 3787 trappist high gravity yeast. Does anyone know if I am to add the whole packet if I'm just using a 2 gallon Mr Beer keg?

I've been waiting for the right moment to make this batch and tonight's the night. I don't want to mess it up.

Thanks!

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Thoreau,
I would use each ingredient as listed so long as you have a full pound of the Candi sugar (453 grams). The only thing I would do is add the Saaz to the boil for about 30 minutes. You'll need to balance malt with the bitterness/flavor of the Saaz. You have the powerhouse yeast so give it a real workout...
:sweat:

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I'd dissolve then boil the Candi at first in 6 cups of water the add the hops for 30 minutes. At flameout add the rest...
This recipe is going to be a strong ale. Good Luck and be sure to post a picture of the outcome!

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Have you activated the yeast pack yet? Or done a starter? I have terrible luck with liquid yeast, never seem to get the timing right, but (and others who know liquid better, jump in) I don't think you can just open that up cold and toss it in.

David

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I just smacked the yeast packet like it says. I'll be leaving it at room temperature for 3 or more hours and waiting for the packet to swell again. I totally didn't know about this step. Looks like I won't be able to make it tonight after all.

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You can stil make it, just let your wort sit and cool while the yeast packet is advertised. That way you have the proper temps for pitching the yeast.

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