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PunkyBrewer

Diacetyl taste

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http://onlinebeerscores.com/blog/how-to-fix-diacetyl/

 

 

if already bottled I read somewhere that you should move the bottles to somewhere warm...leave them alone for a couple weeks. the yeast should clean up most if not all of the diacetyl.

 

I do a kind of diacetyl rest when I brew...  just about 3 days before week 3 is complete I move the fermenter to a warmer area.  not really necessary with ales so much I read but what the heck.. cant hurt.

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That is talking about a lager, not an ale. Lagers need a diacetyl rest to clean up.  Unfortunately ale yeast won't clean it up, much. BTW if your MrB brew said it was a lager, disregard. Unless you changed the yeast from what comes with it, it's an ale.

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You don't give much info on the particular beer, PunkyBrewer.

The first lager I made had tons of diacetyl because I under pitched and then raised the temp when I realized there was not much activity after a number of days. I did not find it undrinkable but it was pretty weird. Aging did help some.

I have had a bit of diacetyl fermenting with an ale yeast that went below the low 60s I intended into the 50s. I think I did a "diacetyl rest" with that one since I was forewarned.

 

Very recently I brewed an "Olde Style Steam Beer" using a regular lager yeast in the low 60s. I actually expected a bit of diacetyl and there is a slight butterscotch in the background. For this beer I think it just adds character.

 

Yeah, aging a month or two should help.

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http://byo.com/belgian-strong-ale/item/534-dealing-with-diacetyl-tips-from-the-pros

 

I will use Rick's standard response:  "Not enough informatoin."

 

Note that the beer also needs to sit on the yeast cake to clean up after primary fermentation.  This means that yes, it could clean up in the bottles, but with much less yeast it will take much more time.  Another reason to stick to the 3-4 method.

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