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sdrake

Hop Sack Question

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This weekend I'm going to mix up the Mad Ludwig's Marzen recipe.  It will be my first attempt at a recipe that is more than dumping HMEs and LMEs into the wort.  This recipe has the following instructions:

 

2. Place the pellet hops into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material.

3.  ...  Bring water to a boil, add in the hop sack, then remove from heat.

 

My question relates to how long should I leave the hop sack in the boiling water before I remove it from the heat.  Do I just drop it and remove from heat to add the HME and LMEs?  Or do I need to boil the hop sack for a specific amount of time.  The instructions, as they don't specify a time, imply removing from the heat right after dropping it in.

 

I see in the footnotes of the recipe instructions that the hop sack remains in the wort throughout fermentation.

 

I'm looking forward to making this one.  It uses W-34/70 yeast which requires a temperature between 51-59F.

 

Anyone else made this recipe?  How did you like your results?

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Hops put in this way add aroma. The boiling water will sterilize the bag and probably help the hops get really wet. You won't get added bitterness unless you boil them a while. When I add hops (dry hopping) later I just put boiling water on the bag for a few min, then take it out, then put the hops in the bag after. I think you get a better aroma when you add them later like that. 1 oz added 1 week before bottling will give quite a good smell. Leave room in the bag for them to expand and the water to circulate through.

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I was thinking the hops are there to add more bitterness to balance out the 2 LMEs that the recipe calls for.  The recipe calls for 1 Oktoberfest HME and 2 Pale LMEs.

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Aroma, and maybe 15% of the bitterness?

 

Some even say the "having to boil hops with wort" is a myth.  Boil up some hop tea, and taste, my guess is that it will be pretty bitter.

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Check the "Alpha" on your hops and refer to a hop chart (thanks to RickBeer). Also different types of hops have vastly different flavor and aroma profiles. There are many resources on line to help you choose. I would start with a mild hop addition, say 1 oz of 5-8 alpha, for a 20 to 30 minute boil. Then for your next brew you can adjust to your preferences. Marzen type beers are usually more malty than hop bitterness. Hope this was helpful.

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Not price efficient, You'd need way more hops to get the same IBUs as a 60 min boil. The problem is they seem to think a 60 min boil only gets 35% utilization (according to their own chart) but it actually gets nearer 95%(refer back to RickBeer's chart 5 posts up). If I need 1 oz @ 60 min for bittering with hop tea it becomes 2 closer to 3 oz..  Now I know that don't seem like much but that's like 6 to 8 bucks more per brew just for bittering. if I set it at $6(cheapest hops my lhbs sells is PoR* @ $3.15 an oz) it adds $312.00 a year (I brew weekly)  Not worth saving 45 min. a week, to me anyway. 

 

 

* Like you could even pay me to use PoR

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So, looking at the chart; could one boil their hops for say 7 min before removing from heat and adding the HME to get a full aroma?

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Then leave the hop bag in the keg during fermentation? I see a lot of different opinions on this.

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Well no, not exactly. I take mine out at the end of the boil(that's the aroma I was planning on). Some leave it in 'till the wort drops to 140f. Beyond that it is a waste of time.

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For dry hopping (sack put into wort after removal from heat or directly into LBK), many leave it in. Some say you get grassy flavors, others not. Many Mr. Beer recipes have you leave it in.

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Just to keep you informed.  The Mad Lugwig's Marzen is doing well as I mixed it up on Saturday morning, although my clanging about in the kitchen woke up my wife who prefers to sleep all weekend.  I put the LBK in a cooler with some ice packs that I'm exchanging with fresh ones every day.  This is keeping the temperature in the 51-55F range.  The recipe calls for 51-59F with the ideal 55F temperature.  Lots of bubbling in the LBK and that beautiful beer smell.

 

It's too bad all of you aren't fortunate to live in Arizona, or I'd have you over to try some of my beers.  Your loss is my gain.

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Just wait until you make the lagers that smell really sulphurous. Smells bad - but it goes after a bit.

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Hi Guys/Gals,

 

Yep I am a newbie and started fishing for a great start making home brew.

 

Note: sdrake is in a warm climate like me (florida). I set up an alarm for temperature durring the forminting process.

 

Any one make a economy chiller for the LBK to satisfy the many temperature requirements of diferent recipies?

 

Ideas?

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Welcome to the forum MnMBeer.  I live in west central GA so most of the year warm is an issue for me to. Any freezer/refrigerator (even a dorm room) and a temperature controller like a STC-1000(what I use) or a Johnson.

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Da Yooper, on 09 Jan 2015 - 1:23 PM, said:

You can also use an Igloo cooler and rotate in frozen water bottles as needed.

 

 

Wow, I need new bi focals

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