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Well water

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Probably depends on kind of beer and kind of minerals. You probably can get a water analysis report from your area aquifer, and then look at some of the online water calculators to see what kind of beer matches that water. You can always dilute it with distilled to make it suitable for beers that want less minerally water. But you should be good for dark or bitter beers probably.

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I've read that water with chlorine or high in iron can give some off-tastes.  But I'm reminded about a beer I got at a pizza place in New York City about 6 years ago in which they bragged their beer was made with NYC water.

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I recommend reading John Palmer's book How To Brew, which has a good discussion of water requirements for good beer, and water treatment. Water that works for coffee can still not produce the best beer. Chlorine can be removed by boiling, but not chloramine which is used in many water supplies and produces an objectionable medinal flavor in beer, but can be removed by a water treatment. High iron gives an objectionable metalic taste, and often is best solved by dilution with distilled or reverse osmosis water. If in doubt, you can use commercial spring water -- low cost, worth using for quality beer.

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Right, but well water has no chlorine or chloramine, and if it tastes good then the iron content isn't an issue. All grain brewing requires one to analyze their water, but extract brewing works without issues where all grain doesn't.

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You don't have to analyze water. I been AG brewing since June '13 just using tap water and it comes out just fine.

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I lived in NYC for many years and the water, of course, is key to make the best pizza dough and bagels. Many of the world's famous beers, are unique due to their water. For the home extract brewer, and even if you steep some grains, any water which is fine to drink, without a chlorine odor, or other tastes, is just fine. For the very advanced brewer, perhaps it matters more.

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We have well water rich in minerals where we live, has anyone tried brewing with well water? Should I buy water instead?

The first few batches I made when I started brewing was with well water, then I thought I could make even better beer if I used bottled spring water and I did that for a while. Now I just use my own well water again for every batch (extract and some partial BIAB) and I can't taste any difference. I do have a good filtration system and I like to fill gallon jugs a few days before I brew and let them sit for awhile with the covers off then put them in the fridge covered until brewday.

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I use well water and mine is heavily filtered removing the iron and minerals.  Works just fine.

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RDWHAHB, guys. John Palmer's book is worth reading by brewers at any level. Adjusting one's water may be an advanced topic, but awareness of water content should be close to a basic skill, because it affects what beers will turn out the best. Using well water is a challenge for some, but not all, brewers because the mineral content varies a lot. Within my local area (Sierra Nevada foothills), some brewers have good clean mountain water, while others have so much iron it's not useful for brewing. Their water works for other purposes, just not brewing great beer. Using extract does not remove needs to know at least a little about water, because the maltster's local water content is in the extract, and then you add your own. For example, one big maltster has local water that is high in sulfates, and the balance between sulfate and chloride affects whether a beer seems bitter or malty. Don't worry, you can sort this out as you gain experience, but again, Palmer's book is good for all levels of brewer. If your beer tastes good as is, keep brewing, but later you might want to go for more. (BTW, I only mentioned chlorine earlier because someone before me had done so, and I know some folks who do not have well water will read this thread.)

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