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urh684

bottling question

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when i start to bottle is it best to put the lbk in fridge for two days i have a lot of trub by the spigot. thanks for all your input.

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From what I have read, yes.two or three days. It is also recomended to put about 3 cd cases under the spigot side of the lbk right from the beginning of fermentation. This will allow the trub to settle further to the back side keeping it away from the spigot.

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when i start to bottle is it best to put the lbk in fridge for two days i have a lot of trub by the spigot. thanks for all your input.

 

   Best?  Yep.  Required?  No.  If you have the room in your fridge and your SO (if any) won't complain about it being there for 3 days, definitely go for it.  

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Also important to prop up the front of the lbk when you put it in the fridge as there will be more stuff falling out of suspension.

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If you don't mind spending a few bucks, get a siphon and a bottling bucket. The black piece at the bottom of the siphon keeps it above the trub. When you transfer your beer into the bottling bucket you don't disturb the trub and end up with it in your bottles. The siphon and bucket together will cost about $20.

IMG_20150102_193817_827_zps9dd19891.jpg?

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I put mine in the frig for a coupe of days with the front tilted up and the trub settles to the rear and solidifies.  I've never had a problem with trub getting in the bottles.  It works so well I never bother with the siphon that I bought.

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Gerry P., on 02 Jan 2015 - 8:49 PM, said:

If you don't mind spending a few bucks, get a siphon and a bottling bucket. The black piece at the bottom of the siphon keeps it above the trub. When you transfer your beer into the bottling bucket you don't disturb the trub and end up with it in your bottles. The siphon and bucket together will cost about $20.

IMG_20150102_193817_827_zps9dd19891.jpg?

 

 

I also got 1 of these the appropriate size.   http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/5-16-auto-siphon-clamp.html?gclid=CIfkq8nr9sICFVNp7AodVVMAjQ

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The auto siphon also comes in handy when you want to transfer your beer from a secondary fermenter (such as a carboy) to your bottling bucket. It beats the ol' "suck the hose" method.

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by putting the lbk in fridge that  will not mess up conditoning at room temp. thanks for all info i wish i had read some post before jumping in and brewing. but i think it is going to turn out good.

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I use just a hose to transfer to my 2.5 gallon slimline for batch priming. I keep my LBKs on inclined ramps and cold crash every batch, and no trub issues. I bought a siphon a few months in but have never used it.

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Good ideas. I find there is a trub deposit in the spigot usually so it pays to flus that out into a separate vessel before filling from the spout. I do usually find that after 3 weeks, everything has pretty well settled out and if I am careful about carrying, I can fill from the spout pretty cleanly.

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by putting the lbk in fridge that  will not mess up conditoning at room temp. thanks for all info i wish i had read some post before jumping in and brewing. but i think it is going to turn out good.

Cold crashing does not impact conditioning. Beer returns to room temp and carbs/conditions just fine.

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From what I have read, yes.two or three days. It is also recomended to put about 3 cd cases under the spigot side of the lbk right from the beginning of fermentation. This will allow the trub to settle further to the back side keeping it away from the spigot.

Wish Mr. Beer has recommended this technique as a part of the wort creation date! 

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As far as cold crashing goes, I live in Michigan and right now temps are in the 20's-30's. Since there's no room in the fridge, could I potentially cold crash out on the back porch? It's covered, but there are no windows, so temps would be pretty chilly.

 

Another option might be our basement. I'm not exactly sure, but I believe it's in the low-60's there.

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BMF, I believe your porch should work.  My attached garage is usually 10 degrees or so warmer than the outside air temp.  As I type this, it is 34*F in my garage.  I would certainly consider it as a cold crashing location.  Heck, I store my wife's soda and my beer out there to save room in the fridge.  Summertime comes back around and we lose a lot of real estate in that fridge!  I'll have to find a spot in the basement to store my bottled/conditioning beers as they won't condition too well out there in the garage in the winter.

 

Not sure how cold is too cold, though, so maybe someone with more experience doing it that way can chime in.

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I've never done it. Cold crashing is done to help clarify the beer by causing the yeast that's suspended in it to flocculate and sink to the bottom, joining its yeasty buddies in the trub. Cold crashing can cause your beer to take longer to carbonate since the amount of yeast removed from the beer prior to bottling has been reduced quite a bit.

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Cold crashing also solidifies the trub, which allows you to get every last drop of beer from the LBK. That's why I cold crash all my batches, and none of them fail to carb or carb slowly.

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As far as cold crashing goes, I live in Michigan and right now temps are in the 20's-30's. Since there's no room in the fridge, could I potentially cold crash out on the back porch? It's covered, but there are no windows, so temps would be pretty chilly.

 

Another option might be our basement. I'm not exactly sure, but I believe it's in the low-60's there.

Walking in to work today, I would have to say that an open porch in Michigan would most likey be a tad too cold right now.  If you have an attached garage that would probably work.

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When you guys cold crash, do you notice less sediment in the bottom of your bottles once conditioning is complete?

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Absolutely, because you get less trub in the bottles to begin with.  Again - I do it because I can get an additional bottle or more from the LBK.

 

You will always have sediment in your bottle when you bottle carbonate.  Yeast has byproducts.

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I don't cold crash.  My bottles carbonate.  I get no trub on the bottom of my bottles.  I'm living good.

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When you gently pour your beer into a glass, watch at the very end, and  you will see the beer turn milky.  That's trub.  It's in nearly every bottle of beer I've poured in the last 2 1/2 years.  Ideally, you stop pouring before it enters the glass.  If you drink a lot of trub, you will cleanse your colon.

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I don't mind the "bottle trub" in something like a Weihenstephan-type hefeweizen. I dump it right in the glass with the beer. Not so much with other styles, since you're supposed to avoid getting the yeast sediment in your beer when you pour it and it can throw off the flavor. I was just wondering if it was worth the trouble doing a cold crash in terms of less sediment in the bottle, and the fact that you can maybe squeeze a little more beer out of the batch. That's more important when you're working with a 2 gallon batch instead of 5 gallons, which is what my batch size has always been in the past. 

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On a Mr. Beer-sized batch, I increase by one bottle.  That's like 5%.  I only do 5 gallon batches now also, in two LBKs, so I'm gaining roughly two bottles, getting say 50 instead of 48.  So like 4%.  

 

Since I ferment in a temp controlled freezer, at 18 days I do an FG check and then simply lower the temp to 37 and 2-3 days later bottle.  Worth it to me for two bottles of beer.

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When you gently pour your beer into a glass, watch at the very end, and  you will see the beer turn milky.  That's trub.  It's in nearly every bottle of beer I've poured in the last 2 1/2 years.  Ideally, you stop pouring before it enters the glass.  If you drink a lot of trub, you will cleanse your colon.

 

I don't have that with my bottles.  The end looks like the beginning in the slow pour into the glass.  Clean living will do this to your beer.

 

Now I refrigerate my bottles before I drink the beer.  When I rinse out the bottles, the first rinse will give me a little trub.  But it's not an issue when I pour out a glass.

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Well, that makes you unique, your pours don't include any trub, but when you rinse the bottle trub comes out.  Guess that's the special "stick into the bottle and don't pour out" trub.  I haven't had any of that.   ;)

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Well if I am careful, I can get the first glass out of a PET bottle trub-free, but I usually get some in the 2nd or as I empty it. I am not going to rinse beer out with the trub. I have to get my vitamins somehow.

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I'm with you Jim. If the bottle has anything in it, it better be in my glass.

Maybe that's why I'm such a regular guy!

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Talking on that I just started a Mr Beer Wheat with coriander and orange peel, but I used a booster pack instead of malt. I made my first one that way and I almost liked it better than those wheat beers I made later with more malt. I used WB-06. I had half a pack saved in the fridge. It was there for several months and seems to be fine - fermenting well. I see no reason why it should not be even though I read not to save more than 7 days.

I also opened an American Light today that I made with the straight refill and 0.5 oz Cascade. That was very refreshing and nice and light at lunch.

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I might try that - but I like to get it done quickly without too much mess/smell. if I don't have to boil the hops, it shouldn't be too bad.

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mash and quickly??? lol  mutually exclusive, mash for an hour and a hour boil to drive off DMS.

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That I doubt I will do. I will stick to the Mr B (or other) HME and add stuff to it. Could be some grain steep or LME/DME, hops etc.

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Try steeping some flaked wheat, it will help with mouth feel and head retention. Say half a lb in a lbk

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WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS OR EXPERIENCES REGARDING BOTTLING WORT IN PREVIOUSLY USED TWIST OF CAP AMERICAN DOMESTIC 12 OZ BEER BOTTLES?

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I tried one or 2 twist offs and they held up OK but all I read says not to use them. I use the PET mostly.

Maybe it depends on the capper. I used one that has a cup fits over the whole top and a pull handle that pushes it down over, not the 2 handed one that squeezes the sides. I posted a pic of it in the gallery.

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I will alternate depending on my schedule.  MrB for when I need a short brew day (have a batch of Northern Brown Ale cooking right now), 60-90 minute extract boil when I have a little more time, and AG when it is a "Me Day" and I have time to play.

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WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS OR EXPERIENCES REGARDING BOTTLING WORT IN PREVIOUSLY USED TWIST OF CAP AMERICAN DOMESTIC 12 OZ BEER BOTTLES?

Don't know how this thread went from cold crashing to bottle types, but there are many posts all over the web regarding NOT using twist off bottles.  Multiple reasons including that with a wing capper the cap may not seat well to the neck being thinner and a wing capper breaking the bottle.  Of course, all your bottles should be brown, not clear or green, unless you're a fan of skunked beer.

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