Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
McDammit

In need of reassurance

Recommended Posts

I'm a week into my first batch ever, it's fermenting and everything seems fine. The problem is that due to holiday mayhem, I wont be getting back home (I'm a truck driver) til right around the three week mark for fermenting. If it goes a day or two past is my beer in trouble? I'm making the Oktoberfest lager if that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, it will be ruined.  Bottle it and mail to:

 

RickBeer

123 I Will Drink Your Beer Lane

Ann Arbor, MI  48105

 

I will properly test each and every bottle.

 

It will be fine.  Asked, and answered, many times on the forum.  A few days over is no issue.  Weeks over is - sitting on the yeast cake for 6 or 8 weeks can impart off flavors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the offer Rickbeer, I'm looking forward to bottling and eventually trying it myself. As a CLOSE second prize I'll let YOU know how it turned out. Lol any comments can be mailed to:

My home brew was delicious court

Winston Salem, NC 27103

Seriously though, thanks.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, this sounds like a great hobby for a long haul driver.  Mix up a batch, and leave it alone for 3 weeks.  That's ideal.  You won't be tempted to peek and poke at it constantly.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funny.  I made my first batch today, looked at the calendar and saw mine will be a day or two over by the time I get to bottling it.   Glad I saw this before I posted the same question. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, my normal routine, except for the above mentioned holiday mayhem. Has me home every 2 1/2 weeks. I thought it'd be ideal to pursue this hobby. I guess just being precise when setting everything up is key. I walked my wife to be (the one who got me the kit) through the bottling instructions and the DVD, but I WANT TO BOTTLE IT MYSELF!!!!!! Does that make me a terrible person? Lol. She will probably assist in future batches buy I really want this first batch to be ALL my doing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ferment almost all of my beers for 3 weeks, so don't worry; soon you will have home brew!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't think I'd get this into it this fast. Like I found a hobby I'm really enjoying. One that hash great rewards too. Lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing you can do is if down the road you see you may be a week or two over is to rack to a secondary.  You will need a 2.5 gallon vessel for that, as the LBK has way too much headspace in my opinion.  I have left beer in the secondary for weeks with no issues, as I can not predict my bottling schedule very well either.  Other benefit is it will really clear the beer.  But as mentioned, you can go several days if not a week with no big issues other than delaying the gratification of a chilled homebrew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being new to brewing and the forums as I am, I don't quite know what racking means. Just prep? Please explain. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

moving the wort to another fermenter or bottling bucket via syphoning. with something like this.

 

post-59190-0-27569700-1420572097_thumb.j

 

 

post-59190-0-33228600-1420572177_thumb.j

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hose connected to bottling wand on one end...auto siphon on another....sanitized of course.   slowly lower siphon into keg until just above the trub layer... insert wand into bottle ..push down ... then pump siphon. if what is transferring is trub,raise the siphon a little.  or start it higher and gradually lower it as your volume drops.

 

as for time sitting in primary fermenter... back in the old days dry yeast was largely crap. the longer it sat, the more cells died off and sunk to the bottom. eventually the cells start breaking down and causing a process called 'autolysis' . the dead cells start releasing compounds into the beer which can make it taste off.  with today's dry yeast being of a high quality.. and with the variety... it isn't as much a problem. ive left beer sit for 4 weeks on the trub cake with no ill effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

fwiw I only use the wand to bottle, If I'm just transferring I just lay the tube on the bottom of the bucket. I don't use a secondary, I just rack to bottling bucket. This serves to helps stir in the priming solution. Though I doubt it's a 7% solution... ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to clarify for new brewers, there is a difference between racking to a secondary and batch priming.  Racking to a secondary involves transferring the wort from the LBK to another vessel to continue fermentation, but removed from the yeast cake.  Most people never consider doing this.

 

Batch priming involves transferring the wort from the LBK to another vessel, mixed with a sugar/water solution, to equally prime the entire batch of beer, and then bottle from the other vessel - often a bottling bucket or a 2.5 gallon slimline container available from Walmart.

 

Transferring can be done the easy way or the hard way  ;) .  I transfer using a hose that connects to the spigot of my LBK and the other end lays on the bottom of my slimline.  I open the tap, and voila!  As the level nears the spigot, I gently tip the LBK forward to keep the wort flowing, and shutoff the valve just before the trub would enter the spigot (cold crashing makes the trub flow s-l-o-w-l-y.   Others transfer using a siphon.  I tried that once, and put it away.

 

The beautiful thing about homebrewing is that the right way is the way you do it - unless of course you do it the wrong way.   :lol:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I use the LBKs that's how I do it. The other two weeks of my pipeline cycle are ale pails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually using a secondary fermenter is (or was, anyway) a common homebrew practice. It probably doesn't make a lot of difference if you're leaving your beer in the fermenter for a few weeks then bottling, but when you get to high gravity beers that need to sit longer you want to get it away from the spent yeast because of a process known as autolysis. That's where the yeast basically runs out of food and starts eating itself, producing off flavors Then again, people have recently been saying that the danger of autolysis, and therefore the necessity of a secondary fermentation, is exaggerated. So anyway yeah...3 weeks is no problem.   :D  Plus you're doing a lager, so I assume you're using a lower fermentation temp which will slow things down a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Though I doubt it's a 7% solution... ;)

You might come up with some great homebrew ideas if it was. Hey, if it was good enough for Sherlock Holmes...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too am a truck driver, but I got off the Big Road right after Hurricane Rita. My current duties bring me home every night. This hobby IS ideal for a road driver though. Like what has already been stated, whip up a batch on your home time, hit the road, and bottle that sucker when you come back in! Awesome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad it worked out, with my routine anyway. Im sure I could get the fiancé to bottle it for me (was a gift from her). She may have to bottle in the future but I want my first batch to be ALL ME! Does that make me a terrible person? Didn't think so.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...