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JCiancarelli7

Making HME

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Hey folk, I have brewed my first batch of beer, and seems to be a success. Now, I want to maybe take it a step further and try making my own HME and such. However, I do not have the slightest clue on where to begin for that.

 

Any ideas, helpful hints, etc?

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After you finish that read "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing" by Charlie Papazian.   Now you've done it. I wonder how they do make an HME? Hey MrB, y'all ought to put out a video of the general steps.  Kind of like that show "How It's Made".  I'm curious how you(or any other maker) gets the water out.

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After you finish that read "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing" by Charlie Papazian.   Now you've done it. I wonder how they do make an HME? Hey MrB, y'all ought to put out a video of the general steps.  Kind of like that show "How It's Made".  I'm curious how you(or any other maker) gets the water out.

 

How to get the water out is the trick. 

We, as in the malt extract makers, have different ways to make our extract and it is a closely guarded secret.  Our proprietary system is inline with our malting process so we do not introduce any more heat which means that our canned malt is minimally darkened.  As you move more into the brewing process you will start to realize that the heating process will darken your beer which is another reason why we do not heat any of the brews that we have as our starters. 

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That's what prompted the question, how to do it with out "over cooking".  Every way I can conceive requires heat, in varying degrees. I thought it would all be the same basic process with the devil being in the details so to speak.(obviously incorrect)

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How to get the water out is the trick. 

We, as in the malt extract makers, have different ways to make our extract and it is a closely guarded secret.  Our proprietary system 

We could tell you, but then we'd have to kill you.

 

Come on, Rick, we know you use rollers to press the water out!

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We could tell you, but then we'd have to kill you.

 

Come on, Rick, we know you use rollers to press the water out!

 

Kill?  never.  Maim... :D

 

Ah just kidding. 

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Since I know the process, I thought I would post some pics.

 

This is a picture of the proprietary process as a roller is being tested prior to being brought into the manufacturing facility:

 

roller1.jpg

 

Of course, since Cooper's (Mr. Beer's parent company) is Australian, there would be kangaroo inside the roller, not a person, and another kangaroo would push the roller with their feet across the wort, pushing out the water.

 

This is an earlier version:

 

the-bubble-rollers-2.jpg

 

 

After the wort is pressed a few times, smaller rollers are drawn across the surface of the now thin brown substance.  Here is a picture of those rollers being prepared:

 

Hippowaterroller.jpg

 

And here is a picture of them being used:

 

15011617540_8f84672bba_b.jpg

 

Finally, smaller rollers are used for the finishing touches:

 

rollers.jpg

 

The wort is then folded into squares, and each square is placed in a can and sealed.  When you open the can, the square has transformed into a thick liquid via a process known as omossisgosis.  

 

569864.jpg

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Hey folk, I have brewed my first batch of beer, and seems to be a success. Now, I want to maybe take it a step further and try making my own HME and such. However, I do not have the slightest clue on where to begin for that.

 

Any ideas, helpful hints, etc?

J, assuming your question is sincere rather than just pulling our leg, the closest practical thing you could do rather than making your own HME is to mash your own wort and then do a hop boil.  

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That's what prompted the question, how to do it with out "over cooking".  Every way I can conceive requires heat, in varying degrees. I thought it would all be the same basic process with the devil being in the details so to speak.(obviously incorrect)

I understand that many use a vacuum process which allows for a boil at much lower temperatures which I would assume would also minimize the coloration.

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Hey folk, I have brewed my first batch of beer, and seems to be a success. Now, I want to maybe take it a step further and try making my own HME and such. However, I do not have the slightest clue on where to begin for that.

 

Any ideas, helpful hints, etc?

You will want to get a few more under your belt, than start taking steps like hop additions, steeping malts, etc.

 

I'm not sure if there is one out currently, but they did do a collaboration brew called Astronut which had hops additions and grain steeps.  When it is available that may be a good start.

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I understand that many use a vacuum process which allows for a boil at much lower temperatures which I would assume would also minimize the coloration.

dirgna5i9.jpeg

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Finely extracted subtances are usually refined or stilled,

 

In a usable quantity requires mass material and proper machinery,

 

The LME is probably no exception, by the time you collect the material and find a way to capture the usable extract, cost outweighs the effort.

 

I can be wrong, M

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MnMBeer, on 13 Jan 2015 - 3:07 PM, said:

Finely extracted subtances are usually refined or stilled,

 

In a usable quantity requires mass material and proper machinery,

 

The LME is probably no exception, by the time you collect the material and find a way to capture the usable extract, cost outweighs the effort.

 

I can be wrong, M

Your probably right the cost, to the home brewer it would be horrendous. Unlike the OP I was prompted by curiosity, not a desire to do.(I brew AG and that's complicated enough thank you)  :)

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It reminds me of early endeavors working in instrumentation for the Citrus Industry in Florida,

 

Once the juice is extracted the hull gets pulped into a refiner for concentrate, remaing orange husk is sent to a centerfuge where pulp oil is extracted and formed into an oil for fragrance and flavoring companies. The oil sold for $600.00 to $1000.00 per ounce pending quality.

 

Remainder of the orange was pelletized into cow feed. no scraps at all.

 

Extracting LME is probably similar with a lot of seasoned ingredients.

 

Back to Beer making, M!!!

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