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I am new to home brewing, but have taken to it like a fly to sh*t....  I just can't get enough of watching brewing videos, reading posts and instructions...etc..  So I am still in the "educating" phase.  I have my first batch of the "Classic American Light" fermenting right now, and would like to add some flavoring via, fresh blueberries, lemon zest, and Pomegranite juice and maybe some other spices.  From what I have found so far, I should add 1lb of fruit p/gal of wort shortly after the fermenting has subsided, so about a week in to the process. 

Does anyone have any suggestions as to refute or substantiate this experimental information?

thank you very much for the input.

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First batch and you're going all mad scientist.  I strongly recommend you don't.  Make it as is, so you know what it tastes like.

 

Fresh blueberries, lemon zest and Pomegranite juice, and some other spices?  Interesting combination.  You're basing this off some recipe you found?  I can say that I have never seen someone add pomegranite juice.  How do you see that combining with the blueberry and lemon zest?

 

If you've done reading, I'm sure you have read about using fresh fruit in beer and how to do that.

 

Going mad scientist is the #2 reason that people quit homebrewing.  See the link in my signature for the #1 reason.

 

Good luck with your experiment.

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That is correct.  However, adding FRESH fruit can be problematic.  You will need to pasteurize it to prevent nasties from getting into the wort.  You will need to mash it up and heat it to around 170F for 10-15 minutes.  Do not boil it.

 

Do not expect tons of flavor out of it though, as fruit is pretty much sugar and water and all the sugars will get eaten up.  That is why I tend to use extracts which can be added at bottling.  They allow you to better dial in the impact and once you have that you are guaranteed consistency if you brew that batch again.

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thank you both very much!  those were both very helpful.  I clearly have a lot to learn about home brewing, and hope to expand my experience and knowlege soon!  As far as "going Mad Scientist", in my personal opinion i hardly think adding a little flavor is that extreme but i guess your right, any little chemical change could ultimately distroy the entire batch.  So I will heed both pieces of advice and just take it slow for my first go around!  I will post once bottled and carbed

thanks again.

Oh and p.s.  GO BUCKS!!!

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On this subject, what kind of malt extract or hops would compliment the Classic American Light? Not asking to go all "Mad Scientist" just looking for suggestions to add flavor (as the brew masters here suggest) to my next batch.

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On this subject, what kind of malt extract or hops would compliment the Classic American Light? Not asking to go all "Mad Scientist" just looking for suggestions to add flavor (as the brew masters here suggest) to my next batch.

This depends on your flavor preferences. Do you like hoppy beers or malty beers? If hoppy, do you like piney, citrusy, earthy, etc.? If malty, do you like it subtle or strong, do you prefer toffee notes, or roasted notes, etc. There are many variables to consider, but it all comes down to what types of beer you enjoy.

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This depends on your flavor preferences. Do you like hoppy beers or malty beers? If hoppy, do you like piney, citrusy, earthy, etc.? If malty, do you like it subtle or strong, do you prefer toffee notes, or roasted notes, etc. There are many variables to consider, but it all comes down to what types of beer you enjoy.

I enjoy all types of beers really. IPAs I like the piney-earthy flavors a lot but will not turn down one that is more fruity. Malty beers I like the strong-roasted flavor that kicks you square in the palate like the Hulk.

Really I'm just looking for something simple to compliment the American Classic Light for my second batch then build of that. Maybe like a light malt flavor with a hint of hop??

Jim Johnson has a good suggestion with the pale LME. I'll file that one away..

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I enjoy all types of beers really. IPAs I like the piney-earthy flavors a lot but will not turn down one that is more fruity. Malty beers I like the strong-roasted flavor that kicks you square in the palate like the Hulk.

Really I'm just looking for something simple to compliment the American Classic Light for my second batch then build of that. Maybe like a light malt flavor with a hint of hop??

 

I would try adding a bit of Cascade hops to the beer. It's a popular hop found in many beers such as Sierra Nevada. It's a good hop for beginners that are wanting to learn more about hop additions since it isn't too high in alpha acids so it won't make your beer too bitter, but it will add a really nice citrusy/piney hop flavor. Alternatively, you could try one of the noble hops such as Tettnang, Saaz, or Hallertau for more earthy/spicy/floral aroma/flavor. And that isn't even scratching the surface. The possibilities are endless.

 

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You should also read up on steeping some grains in your pot before adding your wort to the fermenter. Certain grains will do different things depending on what you're looking for. For example, carapils malt will add more body to your beer, Crystal malts will add color and flavor (depending on the SRM of the malt), roasted grains can add color and roastiness, toasted malts may add a subtle biscuit or crisp, toasty flavor, and a little bit of wheat can lend your beer better head retention. You could even add some smoked or peated grains to give your beer some smokiness. Again, the possibilities are endless. Happy Brewing!

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+1   4oz of carapils will help the mouth feel and head retention. crystal malts also help with that.  FWIW I'd keep it simple and do add an LME, steep 4oz carapils in say a quart of water @ 150 -155f for 30 min.. you can dry hop if desired. Personally dry hopping tastes like grass to me, different flavored grasses to be sure, but grass. I prefer late boil and flame out additions, however I only leave my flame outs in till the wort drops to 160f. 

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I found an LBK on clearance at Bed Bath and Beyond last week (ahh.....my wife made me go, yeah that's it) that included an American Light refill.  It was well passed it's "Use By" date, so I didn't want to invest much extra into it and found the Horse's Ass Ale recipe on the MrB list.  I had some extra Cascade hops on hand, so I didn't have to buy anything else.  It's in the fermenter now so I can't tell you how it turned out yet.

 

But something like that might be a nice next step for you as it introduces hops and other adjuncts (honey, in this case) into the brewing process.

 

http://www.mrbeer.com/horse-s-ass-ale-recipe

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I like Cascade added to the American Light - with either booster or pale malt depending on flavor wanted.

If you like IPA you should get a Diablo can and make that and also dry hop it. I liked it when I used 1 oz Cascade with it for a week before bottling.

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I found an LBK on clearance at Bed Bath and Beyond last week (ahh.....my wife made me go, yeah that's it) that included an American Light refill.  It was well passed it's "Use By" date, so I didn't want to invest much extra into it and found the Horse's Ass Ale recipe on the MrB list.  I had some extra Cascade hops on hand, so I didn't have to buy anything else.  It's in the fermenter now so I can't tell you how it turned out yet.

 

But something like that might be a nice next step for you as it introduces hops and other adjuncts (honey, in this case) into the brewing process.

 

http://www.mrbeer.com/horse-s-ass-ale-recipe

I really enjoyed the horse's ass ale recipe. I am about to brew another batch or two.

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good responses....!   as a 'shiner....we know flavoring our product with fruit can sometimes cause a flavor you might not want..:o  

was wondering about that for perhaps batch #3 ....  will rethink :)

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I am new to home brewing, but have taken to it like a fly to sh*t....  I just can't get enough of watching brewing videos, reading posts and instructions...etc..  So I am still in the "educating" phase.  I have my first batch of the "Classic American Light" fermenting right now, and would like to add some flavoring via, fresh blueberries, lemon zest, and Pomegranite juice and maybe some other spices.  From what I have found so far, I should add 1lb of fruit p/gal of wort shortly after the fermenting has subsided, so about a week in to the process. 

Does anyone have any suggestions as to refute or substantiate this experimental information?

thank you very much for the input.

I AM JUST A FEW SHORT WEEKS AHEAD OF YOU.

 

GOT THE "CLASSIC AMERICAN LIGHT" HME AS A COMPONENT OF THE LBK STARTERS KIT, THAT I RECEIVED AS A CHRISTMAS GIFT.  THAT BATCH WILL BE READY TO DRINK ON 15 FEB.   I DO NOT LIKE "LIGHT" BEER PERIOD,  SO I KNOW I CAN NOT BE AN IMPARTIAL JUDGE OF MY FIRST BATCH. 

 

IF IT SIMPLY TASTES LIKE BEER TO THOSE WHO JUDGE IT FOR ME, THEN I WILL RAISE MY ARMS IN VICTORY!  

 

CURRENTLY HAVE SIX (6) OTHER BATCHES IN VARIOUS STAGES OF FERMENTATION.  6 MARCH IS THE EDD FOR BATCH #2, FOR ME.  I'LL BE SURE TO POST PICTURES AND AN AAR, HERE IN THE FORUM.  IN MY OTHER BATCHES I GOT A BIT MORE AGGRESSIVE.  I ADDED CANNED FRUIT, MOLASSES, GINGER EXTRACT AND CANE SUGAR, TO EACH HME.  I JUST PURCHASED A LARGER FERMENTER AND A FEW AIRLOCKS.   I WAS NOT IMPRESSED AT ALL WITH THE LBK (FROM AN ENGINEERING POINT OF VIEW) , BUT I GUESS IT IS OK FOR ONE'S FIRST BATCH. 

 

I AM CURIOUS AND WILL KNOW LATER THIS SUMMER IF I GOT TOO AGREESIVE OR NOT BY ADDING STUFF TO THE BASIC HME RECIPES.  

 

ANYWAY, THIS ALL HAS BEEN A LOT OF FUN FOR ME AND I ALREADY KNOW I WILL BE PURSUING THIS HOBBY FOR YEARS TO COME. 

 

:)  :D 

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I AM JUST A FEW SHORT WEEKS AHEAD OF YOU.

 

 

CURRENTLY HAVE SIX (6) OTHER BATCHES IN VARIOUS STAGES OF FERMENTATION.  6 MARCH IS THE EDD FOR BATCH #2, FOR ME.  I'LL BE SURE TO POST PICTURES AND AN AAR, HERE IN THE FORUM.  IN MY OTHER BATCHES I GOT A BIT MORE AGGRESSIVE.  I ADDED CANNED FRUIT, MOLASSES, GINGER EXTRACT AND CANE SUGAR, TO EACH HME.  I JUST PURCHASED A LARGER FERMENTER AND A FEW AIRLOCKS.   I WAS NOT IMPRESSED AT ALL WITH THE LBK (FROM AN ENGINEERING POINT OF VIEW) , BUT I GUESS IT IS OK FOR ONE'S FIRST BATCH. 

 

I

:)  :D 

 

ginger extract makes my mouth water!!!! LOL  advie how that goes!

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While experimenting is fine, we strongly recommend that new brewers brew refills as is so you learn what they taste like.  Going all mad scientist can be frustrating when your batches turn out lousy.  Molasses tends to ferment away and just leave a strong licorice taste.  Canned fruit needs to be added at the right time, be pasteurized, and still yields little fruit flavor.  Adding malt extract, vs. sugar, is highly recommended.  While OPR71 has heard this before, just want to make sure that new brewers this far down in the thread do.

 

Some of the posts linked to in my signature may be informative to you.

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OPR71, save the American light for a REALLY HOT summer day and drink it instead of a glass of water. Then it won't taste so bad to you - lol.

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As far as going "mad scientist", brewing is a bit like cooking.

Say you are making hamburgers. You could choose your own beef cuts, grind them yourself for just the right beef/fat/flavor content. Or even mix hamburger and quinoa to make everyone healthier. Maybe mix hamburger with chili peppers, or garlic? And, of course in dreaming these up, you ask yourself "what would I like". And if you're cooking for a crowd you ask "what would they like". Same for brewing.

 

A nice fruit beer has it's place, and an American wheat is a really good base for this.

 

I do think a new brewer should make a "beer" before getting too wild. Just to know, okay I made a beer, and it tastes like a beer. Then you become the brewmaster and make the beers that you like.

 

Here's a link to a well seasoned brewer fooling with a Mr. Beer kit he got from Target recently:

http://www.mrbeerfans.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/344137/Improving_the_Classic_American.html#Post344137

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re going mad scientist.. you mean if I dump a large can of tomato paste and a pound of raw squid rings into my fermenting west coast pale ale I WONT get a calamari  / marinara pale ale????? next you'll be telling me that I cant make a chocolate jello pudding and flan stout!

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I am currently brewing a "Mad Scientist" blend with American Light.

 

This is my fourth batch of CAL, so I guess I am not to new but still not a Pro by any stretch.

 

My CAL contains 2lbs of Vienna Malt steeped,  Cascade (at first 15 mins and last 15 mins)  MB CAL, 1/4 cup carapils, 1/2 cup of rice solids

and two standard MB packets of yeast.  Also, I am dry hopping the cascade in the LBK as well.

 

I am on day 16 right now and just took a small sample taste.  CAL tastes like water to me (found that out on my initial brew last year), but this batch I've made tastes

hella good (albeit still a little green).  Definitely has good mouth feel and a nice "warmth". 

 

Bottling at 21 days as its just about clear.

 

 

Just bottled my Patriot Lager w/ MB PALE  that was hopped with Amarillo and Simcoe and WOW!!  That is some great tasting and smelling beer!!

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Why are steeping Vienna, which needs to be steeped mashed? What are you trying to add? And why 2 pounds?

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While experimenting is fun, it takes almost 2 months to make a beer (not including shipping).

There are so many recipes out there and I think what the majority is suggesting is that you take a few recipes of a style that you like and try them out.  THEN adjust your favorite to your specifications.

 

That's the best way to dial-in your best beer.

This could take months or even years.

 

Welcome to beer making.

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Why are steeping Vienna, which needs to be steeped? What are you trying to add? And why 2 pounds?

 

Hmmm? not sure what you mean when you ask why am I steeping Vienna, which needs to be steeped?

 

Maybe I am using incorrect language..  1lb of Vienna and 1lb 2 row brewers* were in the pot (No bag) at 155 degrees for 1hr.  Is that steeping or mashing?  (Like I said...I am not new but not a pro :) ) * ugh forgot it was not all vienna...it was 3 weeks ago!...LOL

 

I then sparged the grains with water at 170 degrees. I then boiled (low boiled) with hop bags.  First went in at 15 mins and the last at 15 mins.  The rice solids went in slow mixed at 30 to dissolve.

 

The 1lb of Vienna/1lb brewers was from a recipe I found.  Its added as a grain booster instead of a booster pack. Also to add flavor as CAL has none. LOL!

 

It looks and smells good so far, so I assume I did it right :o ?

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Rick is asking why you're doing it because...

  1. Are you trying to get a certain flavor?
  2. ABV
  3. a style you're trying to achieve

It's difficult understand your question if we don't know what your goal is.

There's no right or wrong because no one knows what you want lol.

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OPR71, save the American light for a REALLY HOT summer day and drink it instead of a glass of water. Then it won't taste so bad to you - lol.

I'LL TRY, BUT IF I NEED SOME EXTRA BOTTLES THAT CRAP IS THE FIRST THING THAT WILL BE POURED OUT.  EVER SINCE I FIRST TASTED A GERMAN BEER, I WAS IMMEDIATELY SOLD ON THEM OVER MOST AMERICAN BEERS.  THERE ARE A FEW AMERICAN BEERS THAT I LIKE (SAM ADAMS, YING LING DARK AND A FEW OTHER AMERICAN PORTERS IMMEDIATELY COME TO MIND.) 

 

I SIMPLY DO NOT LIKE WIMPY "LIGHT" BEERS.  

 

WHEN I WAS FIRST STATIONED WEST OF THE MISSISSIPPI AT FORT LEWIS, WASHINGTON AND HAD A COORS, EVERYONE RAGED ABOUT THEM.  I DIDN'T AND STILL DON'T GET IT?   BACK THEN YOU COULD NOT GET COORS EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI.  IS THAT STILL THE CASE?

 

COORS TO ME TASTES LIKE WHAT HORSE URINE MUST TASTE LIKE AFTER IT EATS A BAG OF OATS!! :angry: 

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Rick is asking why you're doing it because...

  1. Are you trying to get a certain flavor?
  2. ABV
  3. a style you're trying to achieve

It's difficult understand your question if we don't know what your goal is.

There's no right or wrong because no one knows what you want lol.

 

 

Definitely more flavor and ABV... style...hmmm? I guess my own.

 

I just guess that CAL is such a blank palette that anything else added would be a hit!

 

Vienna has that biscuit smell and 2 row brewers is a basic.  I figured you cannot go wrong with that along with Cascade. :lol:

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RTIGGS87, on 11 Feb 2015 - 3:25 PM, said:RTIGGS87, on 11 Feb 2015 - 3:25 PM, said:

Hmmm? not sure what you mean when you ask why am I steeping Vienna, which needs to be steeped?

 

Maybe I am using incorrect language..  1lb of Vienna and 1lb 2 row brewers* were in the pot (No bag) at 155 degrees for 1hr.  Is that steeping or mashing?  (Like I said...I am not new but not a pro :) ) * ugh forgot it was not all vienna...it was 3 weeks ago!...LOL

 

I then sparged the grains with water at 170 degrees. I then boiled (low boiled) with hop bags.  First went in at 15 mins and the last at 15 mins.  The rice solids went in slow mixed at 30 to dissolve.

 

The 1lb of Vienna/1lb brewers was from a recipe I found.  Its added as a grain booster instead of a booster pack. Also to add flavor as CAL has none. LOL!

 

It looks and smells good so far, so I assume I did it right :o ?

that's mashing. how much water did you mash in?

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that's mashing. how much water did you mash in?

I mashed in 3 quarts of water at 155.  Then sparged the grains with 2 quarts.  Did my boil/ hop/ rice solids additions. Flamed out and added the MB CAL.

I did a ice water cool down in the sink . (Pot sitting in ice and cooled to 90 degrees)

 

The rest is the standard MB instructions with 4qts of water in the LBK.  Added the wort and topped off the keg to 8. Added the yeast and dry hops and let it go to work!

 

As of this morning (day 17) the keg is about 93% clear.   Letting it go to this Sunday (21st day) and bottling.

 

Then I am doing the 2weeks/2weeks and then refrigerating.

 

When I first started the MB instructions I found did not work well. After reading this forum I found the 3/2/2 method is really the best!!

 

The beer actually does taste better as time goes on and it continues to mellow out.

 

This is my first time making this attempt with this CAL/Grain and Hops so I have no idea what I have so if you try it...don't shoot the messenger! :D

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Over time the 3/2/2 method has become 3/4.  Whether 3/2/2 or 3/4, the goal is 3 weeks fermenting and then 4 weeks in bottles at room temp.  3/4 eliminated the confusion with other guidelines at the time which were 2 weeks in bottles at room temp then 2 weeks in the frig.  

 

3/4 is simple for anyone to remember.

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RTIGGS87, on 12 Feb 2015 - 08:33 AM, said:RTIGGS87, on 12 Feb 2015 - 08:33 AM, said:

I mashed in 3 quarts of water at 155.  Then sparged the grains with 2 quarts.  Did my boil/ hop/ rice solids additions. Flamed out and added the MB CAL.

I did a ice water cool down in the sink . (Pot sitting in ice and cooled to 90 degrees)

 

The rest is the standard MB instructions with 4qts of water in the LBK.  Added the wort and topped off the keg to 8. Added the yeast and dry hops and let it go to work!

 

As of this morning (day 17) the keg is about 93% clear.   Letting it go to this Sunday (21st day) and bottling.

 

Then I am doing the 2weeks/2weeks and then refrigerating.

 

When I first started the MB instructions I found did not work well. After reading this forum I found the 3/2/2 method is really the best!!

 

The beer actually does taste better as time goes on and it continues to mellow out.

 

This is my first time making this attempt with this CAL/Grain and Hops so I have no idea what I have so if you try it...don't shoot the messenger! :D

 

you got to boil that mash wort for an hour to drive off DMS(90 min if it's pilsner malt). low boil will do ('bout all my stove will do with  6.75 gal in the pot.)

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Over time the 3/2/2 method has become 3/4.  Whether 3/2/2 or 3/4, the goal is 3 weeks fermenting and then 4 weeks in bottles at room temp.  3/4 eliminated the confusion with other guidelines at the time which were 2 weeks in bottles at room temp then 2 weeks in the frig.  

 

3/4 is simple for anyone to remember.

I do 3/2/2 for my lagers but last 2 aren't at frig temps.  I use 55F.

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Considering that almost every Mr. Beer batch is an ale, not a lager, that info just confuses the new brewers.   ;)   If Mr. Beer sells them a lager, the instructions specify the lower temperature.

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Hmmm? not sure what you mean when you ask why am I steeping Vienna, which needs to be steeped?

 

Maybe I am using incorrect language..  1lb of Vienna and 1lb 2 row brewers* were in the pot (No bag) at 155 degrees for 1hr.  Is that steeping or mashing?  (Like I said...I am not new but not a pro :) ) * ugh forgot it was not all vienna...it was 3 weeks ago!...LOL

 

I then sparged the grains with water at 170 degrees. I then boiled (low boiled) with hop bags.  First went in at 15 mins and the last at 15 mins.  The rice solids went in slow mixed at 30 to dissolve.

 

The 1lb of Vienna/1lb brewers was from a recipe I found.  Its added as a grain booster instead of a booster pack. Also to add flavor as CAL has none. LOL!

 

It looks and smells good so far, so I assume I did it right :o ?

I just brewed a batch on Tuesday using something similar.  Two pounds of 2-row, 4 ounces of 60L Crystal, mashed in 3 quarts of H2O at 152 degrees F for one hour.  Sparged with two quarts H2O at 170 F.  Low boil for one hour, 1/2 ounce each Amarillo and Simcoe hops in at 55 minutes.  CAL HME in at flameout.  Ice bath in sink until 85-90 F.  Into the LBK with the required amount of bottled water.  Pitched 5.75 grams of Safale US-05 dry yeast.  Smelled great.  Just snuck a peak at it and its actively working. 

 

Can't claim credit for this recipe.  I saw a YouTube video with the guys from www.basicbrewing.com use this recipe to doctor-up a MB wheat HME.  They used this recipe instead of mixing in the Booster pack.  The video is three years old and there were some comments made about MB providing LMEs with recipes now rather than Booster packs.  I don't remember there being any LMEs or DMEs available from MB when I first brewed in 2005-06.   

 

Anyway, thought I'd give it a try on the CAL since I'm not a light beer drinker, either.  And dammit, I've got the physique to prove it!  :lol:   

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my question has been answered, brewing the American light "straight up", nothing extra, I guess a wheat beer is what I need

 

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That is correct.  However, adding FRESH fruit can be problematic.  You will need to pasteurize it to prevent nasties from getting into the wort.  You will need to mash it up and heat it to around 170F for 10-15 minutes.  Do not boil it.

 

Do not expect tons of flavor out of it though, as fruit is pretty much sugar and water and all the sugars will get eaten up.  That is why I tend to use extracts which can be added at bottling.  They allow you to better dial in the impact and once you have that you are guaranteed consistency if you brew that batch again.

So, I have a can of American Light, and it will be my 2nd brew. I currently have a batch  of Oktoberfest in the carbonation phase. I've tasted enough beer in my time to already have a vague idea of what the American Light will taste like, so naturally, I was intrigued by the prospect of adding flavor. Obviously, adding fresh fruit is just a pain in the rear. But, the notion of adding extract at bottling sounds much easier. And I was wondering if anyone had any tips about that process.

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If you batch prime, you add the fruit extract flavor to the batch prime vessel, then the beer, then bottle.

 

If you bottle prime, you add it to each bottle, but the quantity per bottle will be small.

 

I will be drinking our new Fruit Wheat beer starting 4/30 with a bunch of fruit flavors, each added to a glass with an eyedropper before pouring the beer in from the bottle.

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Sorry, I meant mashing.  Typing on the phone.

ohhhhhhh, ur not typing while driving r u? lol!
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I agree,

 

Mashing or steeping grains to mash is an alternative.

 

Ready___________ Drink

 

 

cheers

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I agree,

 

Mashing or steeping grains to mash is an alternative.

 

Ready___________ Drink

 

 

cheers

What?

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