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mcasselman

Wart fermenting temp

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Sorry to beat a dead horse, but I have taken the advice of fermenting with an ambient temp of between 64F and 67F (house temp in sunny upstate NY). I did have a heater in the room previously set to maintain an ambient temp of 73F (did not have thermometer on kegs then). With that said I brewed the NW Pale and Diablo IPA yesterday afternoon and the thermometers on the kegs show 64 and 68 highlighted. The part I am confused about is that MR Beer suggests between 68F and 76F for the standard yeast. Am I good with such a "low" wart temp?

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You are perfect. Keep the temp low. 64-66 is perfect for the mr beer yeast. It will take 3 weeks to ferment. Don't touch until then.

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I brewed my first batch with an ambient temperature of 66°F. Everyhting I have read so far indicated the temperature in the keg should be a little higher as a product of the fermentation. I just bottled today, but the hydrometer readings I took indicate that the fermentation was successful. I imagine you should be ok in the end.

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Even for wort...

So RickBeer do you agree? Do you think Mr Beer suggest the higher temp to "expedite" the fermentation?

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So RickBeer do you agree? Do you think Mr Beer suggest the higher temp to "expedite" the fermentation?

 

I think it's safe to say Rick agrees that temp is as good for wort as it is for warts.

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Gotcha....I meant wort....just caught that....still I wonder why Mr Beer suggests such a high temp?

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Hey now! I could be wrong, but I think those temp ratings are "optimal" for the yeast. Different species(?) thrive in different climates. The base MB yeast has the highest tolerance. Right, guys?

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I understand that different yeast stains have differnet ranges, but with the standard Mr Beer yeast, Mr Beer suggests 68 to 76 (optimum 72). Yet everyone here says for best results below 68 is better (understanding wort temp will rise during peak).

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yep you don not have beer in a couple of weeks  fermenting at the higher temp cause the yeast to be more let's say "FLAVORFUL?"  Give your beer 21 days in the LBK and another 28 to carb & condition.  If I would have kept following the kit directions I would have quit brewing the beer was that bad!

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We try to accommodate thousands of persons' individual situation which is a house at 68 degrees in upper Michigan in winter and 80 degrees here in Arizona during summer (not even talking about OUTSIDE temps!)  As people get more experience, they can start to tailor their brews and pick yeasts that fit best.  Until then, we have a robust yeast that fits a wide temperature range.

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The yeast are all the same species, but like dogs, varieties can vary greatly. Ale yeasts have a wide range of temperature tolerance, and fermentation products (aside from ethanol) also vary. These other products are distinct to the variety of the yeast and temperature (ketones, aldehydes, fatty acids, esters, amino acids) and produce different hints of fruit, spice, earthy, etc. "Choose wisely, young Grasshopper" - yeast variety and fermentation temperature can make two identical worts into two very different tasting beers. Learning about the yeasts, temperature, water, grains, is part of the fun of the hobby}

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We try to accommodate thousands of persons' individual situation which is a house at 68 degrees in upper Michigan in winter and 80 degrees here in Arizona during summer (not even talking about OUTSIDE temps!)  As people get more experience, they can start to tailor their brews and pick yeasts that fit best.  Until then, we have a robust yeast that fits a wide temperature range.

Rick, regarding the robust yeast with wide range, I started a little experiment about 6 months ago that you might like to hear about.  I used a 5 gm packet of the Coopers gold yeast that comes with the refills.  I was looking for something that combined the ease of pouring new wort on a yeast cake right after bottling with the relatively more refined method of serious yeast washing, only without storing and starters.  To make a long story short, that single packet of yeast is on it's 14th batch now.  I'm almost sorry I started this experiment, only because it seems like it may never end.  The batches have been mostly all extract, a few partial mashes, and one all grain, swinging back and forth from light to dark recipes with no problem.  I tend to drastically overfill the LBK to get at least 9 liters of beer, and I used to have a lot of spillover eruptions.  Over time, this yeast has evolved to where the krausen is smooth and creamy, I never get any more overflows, and the attenuation has been excellent, as has been the final product.  I do sprinkle a pinch each of nutrient and energizer into each batch of wort before pitching about half of the "washed" yeast.  This is the only yeast I've tried this with, so I can't say how others would do.  But this one is doing marvelous.

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Cooper's Gold is a very good all-purpose yeast. As Rick said, it's very "robust". I wouldn't be surprised if you got more than 20 batches out of it, which is uncommon for most other yeasts, with the exception of maybe S-05. The fact that the Cooper's Gold is so successful, even for beginners, is the reason we include them in our kits. It's very reliable and consistent.

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Rick, regarding the robust yeast with wide range, I started a little experiment about 6 months ago that you might like to hear about.  I used a 5 gm packet of the Coopers gold yeast that comes with the refills.  I was looking for something that combined the ease of pouring new wort on a yeast cake right after bottling with the relatively more refined method of serious yeast washing, only without storing and starters.  To make a long story short, that single packet of yeast is on it's 14th batch now.  I'm almost sorry I started this experiment, only because it seems like it may never end.  The batches have been mostly all extract, a few partial mashes, and one all grain, swinging back and forth from light to dark recipes with no problem.  I tend to drastically overfill the LBK to get at least 9 liters of beer, and I used to have a lot of spillover eruptions.  Over time, this yeast has evolved to where the krausen is smooth and creamy, I never get any more overflows, and the attenuation has been excellent, as has been the final product.  I do sprinkle a pinch each of nutrient and energizer into each batch of wort before pitching about half of the "washed" yeast.  This is the only yeast I've tried this with, so I can't say how others would do.  But this one is doing marvelous.

 

Wow, this is really interesting stuff.  This is the great thing about homebrewing and general curiosity.  Maybe you can get as far as the Boudin Sourdough bread company who has been running on the same starter from 1849!

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Unfortunately, Joe is too old to make that long, but he was born just before they started that sourdough yeast.

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Unfortunately, Joe is too old to make that long, but he was born just before they started that sourdough yeast.

Ironically, I recall thinking that sourdough thing was a silly idea and could never work.

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