Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Brewer

inside dimensions of mouth of LBK?

Recommended Posts

I just got myself an LBK kit and have started to use it to brew a batch of beer - otherwise I would measure this myself - but does anyone know the inside dimension of the mouth of the LBK fermenter?. I ask because what I would like to do is replace the cap with a drilled silicon bung and bubbler so that I have a more visible indication of the kind of activity going on inside the vessel ... Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I don't think that's going to work.  The LBK rim has notches cut into it to let out pressure.  Therefore, an airlock will never work.  Even if you use a bung, it would have to be a perfect fit down low enough to cover the notches.  I also have active fermentations going or I'd look, but I THINK that the notches go all the way down the rim.

 

The solution is to stop perving...   :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The notches don't go down very far but they do go all the way across the lip. I will stop giving advice here and let others who know better offer further advice. I will say though moding existing products can have a wide range of unintended consequences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A guy on Utoob filled the two vents in with hot glue and put an airlock in the lid.

 

Mine are empty at the moment - sacrilege, I know! - but I had to get my schedule back on track with my orders.  This weekend and next will see two of three LBKs back in service.  I'll try to remember to get some measurements and pics at lunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But a bung that wide (whatever the exact width is) is  likely to be more than an inch tall and so it should be able to sit both above and below the notches which if my memory serves me (and it may not as I just glanced at the mouth before I started to use the vessel),  are vertical and not horizontal. Yes?  In other words aren't the notches cut into the threads onto which the cap fits. The cap sits outside the threads and so outside the vents allowing the vents to um... vent. MY thought would be to plug the mouth with a bung which would sit inside the notches thus sealing the opening. Of course, if the notches are horizontal then you are correct. A bung could not then seal the mouth. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An airlock isn't necessarily an accurate tool for the indication of an active ferment. Even after the ferment has completed, the airlock can still bubble from residual Co2 off-gassing. You could add an airlock if you wished using your method. It would work, there's just no real benefit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Josh. Do you happen to know the ID (inside diameter) of the mouth?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brewer, I have a spare LBK right here beside me.  The ID of the top lip appears to be 3 3/4", more precisely, 3 13/16, assuming my tape measure is well made.  The two notches are horizontal.  I imagine you could easily fill them in.  I know there's a non-toxic silicone caulk used for aquariums, which should be safe for humans.  One thing is that the top lip of the LBK opening is a thin piece of plastic strip as opposed to being a deeper 'wall' for the bung to push up against.  I suppose it would work, in spite of being less than ideal for a good seal.  I hope this helps, if you decide to pursue it.  

 

As a side note, I use rubber stoppers with holes in along with airlocks for my secondary glass jugs when making wine and cider, and they're great.  But I use no airlock for primary fermentation of of my wines or ciders.  I've been making beer with the LBK for 3 years, and have never seen the need for an airlock.  I couldn't be happier with the performance of the LBK, aside from some spigot issues.  But I've never missed the presence of an airlock.  

 

Edit-  I suppose technically, you could either trim away the thin horizontal lip inside the top of the mouth and/or fill the rest of the mouth walls under that lip with non-toxic silicone to create a more substantial wall for the bung to seal against.  Worst possible outcome is you lose a $10 LBK and $5 worth of silicone.  And then, it might work like a charm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just measured the inside diameter lip and it was almost exactly 4" (just short by a hair). I would avoid using silicone as it may collect bacteria and/or wild yeast in the seams where the plastic and silicone meet. It just seems like too much work and risk for little benefit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just measured the inside diameter lip and it was almost exactly 4" (just short by a hair). I would avoid using silicone as it may collect bacteria and/or wild yeast in the seams where the plastic and silicone meet. It just seems like too much work and risk for little benefit.

 

That's pretty much the way I figure it, too.  Not worth it, really.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bung would seal it as the vertical portion (inner ring dimension) is uniform, even though it is not the same height on the horizontal due to the notches.

 

Here is what the notches look like:

 

20150122_123121_zpsbf470238.jpg

 

20150122_123217_zpsf968bdd9.jpg

 

 

 

I also measured 3.75ish" on the inside edge of the lip, 4ish" to outside edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I think that there are bio-pharmaceutical companies that make silicone bungs that are unquestionaby sterilizable (forget sanitzable) and if they make them with sufficient width there should be no more worry about contamination that anyone would have with rubber or silicone bungs used in Better Bottles or glass carboys...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not get a carboy and do whatever you want?

The LBK is designed to work a certain way.  And believe me, it works!

Seems like you're trying to take the tread off the tire so you can put on spray rubber because you think it will look better.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your biggest problem will be getting the stopper out after you have seated it. The top lip is very thin on my LBK's. You will probably get the stopper in with a good seal and then crack the lip off when you try to remove it.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your biggest problem will be getting the stopper out after you have seated it. The top lip is very thin on my LBK's. You will probably get the stopper in with a good seal and then crack the lip off when you try to remove it.

 

That was a concern of mine as well.  Especially putting the bung in and out a few times could easily damage that thin lip.  I guess you could cut off the lip with an exacto knife.  That might help.  With all due respect, I love to tinker with stuff a lot myself, but I think Vakko is on to something when he says why not just get a fermenter more suited to an airlock and bypass all the issues entirely?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if all you want is a pervable fermenter: walmart sells beverage bottles.  I use these on occasion.  use a 3/8" spade bit .. I think that is the diameter  and auger out a hole in the lid.  insert a rubber grommet. presto. instant pervable fermenter.

 

after sanitizing everything, I wrap a few twists of plumbers tape around where the spigot goes and the cap screws.  add an airlock and voila.

 

personally I don't see why you want to all the extra work though.  to see "whats going on" in your lbk just shine a flashlight at it. they aren't so opaque that you cant see krausen  or trub.  further as was already pointed out, airlock activity or lack of it is not a good gauge of fermentation.  I ferment in buckets and almost never see airlock activity because they aren't airtight.  same with the bevie bottle. I only use the bevie bottle when my other fermenters are busy... or I just want to perv fermentation. I'm odd that way. I find yeast fascinating to watch.

 

I would just use the lbk as is.

 

 

0007065200756_180X180.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking Zorak's idea even one step less further, I've been thinking myself, instead of a bung, wouldn't it be cheaper and easier to just drill that hole and add a grommet for airlock to the lid of the LBK itself? I guess you'd need to plug the two vents, but that's easily done. I know others have done that in the past. I always take the laziest path to the same result when possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if all you want is a pervable fermenter: walmart sells beverage bottles.  I use these on occasion.  use a 3/8" spade bit .. I think that is the diameter  and auger out a hole in the lid.  insert a rubber grommet. presto. instant pervable fermenter.

 

after sanitizing everything, I wrap a few twists of plumbers tape around where the spigot goes and the cap screws.  add an airlock and voila.

 

personally I don't see why you want to all the extra work though.  to see "whats going on" in your lbk just shine a flashlight at it. they aren't so opaque that you cant see krausen  or trub.  further as was already pointed out, airlock activity or lack of it is not a good gauge of fermentation.  I ferment in buckets and almost never see airlock activity because they aren't airtight.  same with the bevie bottle. I only use the bevie bottle when my other fermenters are busy... or I just want to perv fermentation. I'm odd that way. I find yeast fascinating to watch.

 

I would just use the lbk as is.

 

 

0007065200756_180X180.jpg

I would avoid fermenting in these or any other water containers, unless it specifically says it's PET. The acids and such caused during fermentation can leach harmful chemicals out of the plastic and into your beer.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking Zorak's idea even one step less further, I've been thinking myself, instead of a bung, wouldn't it be cheaper and easier to just drill that hole and add a grommet for airlock to the lid of the LBK itself? I guess you'd need to plug the two vents, but that's easily done. I know others have done that in the past. I always take the laziest path to the same result when possible.

 

I guess my thinking was to find a good way to use a bubbler without damaging the plastic cap. The path I tend to take is the one that causes least damage and drilling a hole in the cap to seat a #6 bung is then more costly - in terms of damage  - than finding a #15 bung (which is by the way is VERY $$$ costly... so I may not go that route after all)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Replacement lids are $2.95, so not much damage cost-wise if you mess it up.  I ordered a spare just in case, and an extra spigot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess you'd need to plug the two vents, but that's easily done.

I suppose you could just put some kind of tape around the lid to seal the seam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess my thinking was to find a good way to use a bubbler without damaging the plastic cap. The path I tend to take is the one that causes least damage and drilling a hole in the cap to seat a #6 bung is then more costly - in terms of damage - than finding a #15 bung (which is by the way is VERY $$$ costly... so I may not go that route after all)

I was thinking the bung that large would be expensive. Like Jim says, you don't even need a stopper in the lid, just a grommet for the airlock itself. Please let us know what you end up doing and how it works out. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bpa free...   I obsess over stuff like that.  :)   who am I kidding.. I obsess over everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a OLD YELLER LBK it has a bubbler on it but its to tall for my fermentation chamber so I filled the hole in the lid with hot glue and solved the problem.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very simple answer.  Get a Mr. Beer cider keg which is clear.  You will need to keep it out of sunlight or keep it covered so as to avoid skunking (just like a carboy) but if you are looking at seeing the fermentation that would be much simpler than a bung, drilling holes that may or may not work, etc.  After you get a few brews under your belt perving will not be as much of an issue (except if you are Zorak), and shining a flashlight after two weeks or so to see the state of the krausen will suffice.  But if you GOTSTA see what is going on, get a clear keg.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...