Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Vakko

Why does LA VIE BOHEME say to carb at 55F?

Recommended Posts

From what I've read, carb'ing at 55F will be incredibly slow yet this recipe specifically says to do so.

Any comments?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey vakko, it uses lager yeast which requires lower fermentation temps for it to taste the way it's supposed to. Ale yeasts ferment at higher temps, mid 60s typically, but it depends on the strain you're using. BTW, traditionally the term "lager" means to store the beer at a relatively lower temperature for an extended period. Hence the term "lager", to describe a beer which uses bottom-fermenting "lager" yeast that benefits from longer aging, at lower temperatures, prior to bottling. ("Lager" being the German word for "store away" or something along those lines.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Gerry (above) said.  That particular recipe uses a lager yeast, not an ale yeast.  Most homebrewers are restricted to making ales because of the much lower temperature requirements of lagers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That reminds me, I just found out about a yeast sold by White Labs called Cry Havoc, which is supposed to ferment well at both ale and lager temps. Do you guys have any experience with it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I've read, carb'ing at 55F will be incredibly slow yet this recipe specifically says to do so.

Any comments?

I have done a few lagers. My usual process now is 1-2 week in primary, transfer to secondary (to get off the yeast cake) and lager in the fridge for 2-4 weeks. Then I bottle it by batch priming and carb, ideally in the high 60s. I get a nice clean lager doing this.

 

So I am not real sure what the reasoning is to carbing that low. Perhaps it takes the place of laggering before bottling. I do have to test the carbonation of my bottles as it can take longer than usual sometimes after the lager phase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey vakko, it uses lager yeast which requires lower fermentation temps for it to taste the way it's supposed to. Ale yeasts ferment at higher temps, mid 60s typically, but it depends on the strain you're using. BTW, traditionally the term "lager" means to store the beer at a relatively lower temperature for an extended period. Hence the term "lager", to describe a beer which uses bottom-fermenting "lager" yeast that benefits from longer aging, at lower temperatures, prior to bottling. ("Lager" being the German word for "store away" or something along those lines.)

I think you're missing the question.  I understand that you need to fermentate at 55F.  That's a given: its a lager yeast.  However, the questions is about carb'ing.  Of all the instructions I have seen on Mr. Beer, this is the ONLY recipe that specifically says to carbonate at 55F.

 

Why is this?  It is using the same yeast as most of the other recipes.  So this doesn't make sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I did miss the question. In that case, I imagine they tell you to condition at lower temperatures for the same reason you should ferment at lower temperatures. I've read some stuff by a few people who say to condition at warmer temperatures, then back in the fridge for more lagering. I think the small amount of yeast activity required to provide carbonation isn't enough to produce esters. Then again I don't do lagers, so you might want a second opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding for lagers (noting that nearly all Mr. Beer recipes are ales for the noobs) is to carb at the regular 70 degree temps for four weeks, then store your beer in a cold environment for months.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also my understanding.  And it is repeated and every lager recipe that Mr. Beer has EXCEPT the La Vie Boheme.  Enter confusion...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just checked out the yeast company's site and the instructions for La Vie. I have no idea why, but Mr. Beer must mean business because they tell you to carbonate at 55 deg. twice in the same section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The recipe uses S-23 yeast.  So does May The Schwarz Bier With You.  It does not say the same.

 

True lager recipes have you raise the temp for a few days before you're done, often in a secondary.  Then they bottle condition at room temp, then store your beer cold for a few months.  If you Google S-23 on the Mr. Beer site you get a lot of differing opinions.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=site%3Acommunity.mrbeer.com+s-23

 

I have never made a lager, so I'm just saying what others say works, but I'd recommend reading links from this and others on the web.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...True lager recipes have you raise the temp for a few days before you're done, often in a secondary... 

Actually, when I do lagers, if all goes well with the fermentation temp and they get a bit of cold lagering no diacetyl rest is needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, when I do lagers, if all goes well with the fermentation temp and they get a bit of cold lagering no diacetyl rest is needed.

The rest is based off of temp at start of fermentation.  So yes, if you lower your wort to 55F before you add the yeast, you wouldn't need a DR if you kept things consistent.

 

But the original question was why this one recipe suggests 55F bottle conditioning after fermentation when all of the the other lager recipes (the dozen or so) say to condition at room temp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not entirely sure why this recipe says to carbonate at 55 degrees. It could have been a typo, or it could have been what the Brewmaster that wrote the recipe had best results with. Either way, I see no reason to carbonate at low temps since the carbonation stage won't impart or change the flavor of the beer regardless of temperature. Plus it would take 2-3 months to carbonate at that temp. I will talk to the webmaster to have this changed. Thanks for pointing it out! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is at least one other recipe (in the archive) that specifies carbonating at 55 deg -- Mad Ludwig Marzen. I brewed this one (my first lager) a few weeks back and because I figured I should follow the instructions, I left the bottled beer at garage temp of 54-55 deg. for carbonating. After a week or so, the bottles were still soft. I found this thread and moved the bottles to room temperature for quicker carbing. Eventually, these will go back out to the garage for lagering/ conditioning. The more I think about this, it raises the possibility that the beers may have been carbonating just fine out in the garage and because of the cooler temp more of the CO2 is going into solution than going into headspace? Simple physics? Additionally, the Saflager W34/70 had no problem fermenting sugar at that temp all along, so...

Any thoughts on this might help me with the Uncle Monkey's Dunkel lager I have fermenting out there right now. Later Forum,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...