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Ant!

Flat Cider

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APPLE CIDER KIT...

 

 

I followed the guidelines to a "T".

 

I left it in the firdge for almost a month.

 

But it is very flat, as if it's been sat in a glass and left for several days.

 

Can someone offer any tips?

 

Thanks

 

Ant!

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ok question:

 

when you bottled it, did you add the sugar to the bottles?

having done that did you immediately stick them in the fridge for a month? or leave it in room temp to carbonate?

 

yeast will fall asleep in cold temps.  I suspect you misread the instructions, added the sugar and immediately stored the bottles in the fridge....or forgot the priming sugar. you also need only post a question in one place.. not across multiple forum categories... we'll find it and help if we can.

 

 

IF you in fact bottled and immediately stuck them in a fridge, take them all out. move them into a room where the temp is about 70F and leave them alone for a week or two. the bottles will firm up if plastic.  THEN put what youre going to drink in the fridge.

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I'm having a similar problem. Used the basic apple cider kit, fermented, bottled with priming sugar (yes I'm sure). Its sat on my counter for a solid three weeks+. The bottles are firm but not rock hard, I've put them in the fridge for what ended up being 5-7 days, and when I take it out the bottle is soft and they're flat. Any ideas?

Also, not real impressed. I like angry orchard and similar, but this has tasted much more like apple flavored beer.

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If they weren't hard enough, why did you refrigerate them? One I could see, to do a carb check, but not all. Take them back out, and let 'em sit let them sit longer.  On your counter? Where on your counter?  You know yeast hates UV right?  Put 'em under a towel anyway, better safe than sorry.

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If the above reply was to me, I did not put them all in the fridge, just one at a time a couple weeks apart, and they were hard when they went in but not when they came out, there's an easy opening for a dirty joke...

As for the counter, they are tucked away not in direct sunlight.

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What temps were your bottles stored? Did you tighten the caps all the way? Did you use the correct amount of carb drops/sugar? Was there uneven carbonation (some carbed more than others)?

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I don't have my notes here but temp is right around 70, I believe 2 1/2 tsp of priming sugar, caps are tight, new bottles and caps, and yes some are harder than others. I just checked them again last night and they seem to be firmer, so I stuck another in the fridge to try out.

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I guess my main question that I think everyone missed is the bottles were firm before going in the fridge. They sat for 5-7 days then were soft when I went to open them and enjoy. What would cause them to lose that pressure?

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I guess my main question that I think everyone missed is the bottles were firm before going in the fridge. They sat for 5-7 days then were soft when I went to open them and enjoy. What would cause them to lose that pressure?

The pressure of Co2 will drop a bit in the cold. Which is the reason champagne and most sparkling wines should only be opened when chilled. And since it's not quite carbonated, perhaps you just need to leave them out longer? Also, what size were your bottles?

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Ok thanks. We'll test another out tonight. The bottles are the clear ones that come with the cider kit, 1 liter.

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Hmmmm. I'm thinking you may just need to wait a bit longer. The only other thing I can think of is temperature swings. If there are any temperature swings (such as night temps being colder than day temps), it could inhibit the carbonation process.

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They're in my house and its winter in Minnesota, but the furnace runs the same temp day and night, shouldn't be more than 1 or 2 degrees difference. They are a ways away from any heat vents too, so they aren't getting a blast of hot air, its gotta travel some 20+ feet before reaching them.

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@ Ant and Plaintoast:  This does seem very odd.  I hope you update us in a week or two.  I hope they come through for you.  If not, and it was me, I wouldn't be opposed to priming those bottles again.

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Yeah, I've never had any issues with carbonation and I've used the exact same measurements, temps, bottles, etc. Let us know how they turn out.

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Regarding the taste, it will NOT taste like an Angry Orchard or most mass market ciders.  Those are usually backsweetened in some way.  Juice is basically sugar, and sugar is fermented and a lot of aroma is blown out the airlock as well.  Once you get the basics under your belt if you like a sweet cider you can investigate various ways of getting the sweetness back in.

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Regarding the taste, it will NOT taste like an Angry Orchard or most mass market ciders.  Those are usually backsweetened in some way.  Juice is basically sugar, and sugar is fermented and a lot of aroma is blown out the airlock as well.  Once you get the basics under your belt if you like a sweet cider you can investigate various ways of getting the sweetness back in.

+1

Most homemade ciders will be dry unless it contains some unfermentable sugars. When making sweeter ciders, I usually keg them. First, I'll stabilize the cider by adding potassium sorbate, then I backsweeten to how I like it and force carbonate it. This obviously requires a kegging system, but those are always a great investment for someone that loves brewing.

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To update everyone on this odd problem.... I stuck another in the fridge and this time it remained hard after 5 days, and the flavor was much better. Much less beer flavor and more cider-like. I guess this one just took a while to age and stabilize the carbonation? Whatever the issue, its good now and I have 4 bottles of what should be good stuff left.

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Im not sure if I should jump in on this feed but here goes...

 

I am not a Angry Orchard beer fan but my wife is so I made her a batch.  Followed the directions to the T and took my OG and FG readings and al were perfect.  Bottled and capped stored at room temp.  After a few weeks my wife tried one and told me is smelled and tasted like yeast.  She discribed it as freash bread???

 

Has this happened to anyone before?

Am I missing something?

Im hopeing that letting them Lager longer will help.

 

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated so I can figure out what I am doing wrong if anything.

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If they have been conditioned long enough and in the fridge for a couple to few days then the only reason it would taste like yeast is if you poured out the yeast layer into the glass or shook them before serving.

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Also, you want to pour the bottles into glasses, not drink from the bottle. Drinking from the bottle will disturb the sediment causing it to cloud up your cider and make it taste like yeast. Any bottle-conditioned beverage should be poured into a glass for consumption. The trick is to do a quick swift pour while the beverage is very cold. This will keep the sediment packed tightly on the bottom of the bottle.

One other thing I would like to point out is that our ciders are nothing like Angry Orchard. Angry Orchards are sweet American style ciders while ours are dry English style ciders. Our ciders are dry and tart with little to no sweetness. Adding sweetness to a cider is difficult without pasteurizing the carbonated bottles at the right time or owning a kegging system. This is because any sugar you add for sweetness will be eaten by the yeast. The best way I've found to get some residual sugars into your cider is to use a gallon of quality apple juice in place of 1 gallon of water that you would use for your batch. This will add some extra apple flavor and body in addition to some residual sweetness (but not as sweet as Angry Orchard). 

 

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I'm not so sure UV light is bad for yeast. I know it definitely skunks the hops.

 

UV is bad for any single cell organism.

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Thank you I wil pass this a long to my wife.  I will also def try the addition of apple juice to her next batch.

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