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ohsigmachi

Messing about with the 2013 Winter Seasonal

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First off, Hello. Long time lurker, occasional brewer, first time poster.

 

 

So, I like many of you, I decided that the recent sale of the 2013 Winter Seasonal Belgian Spiced Ale was too good of a deal to pass up.

 

That being said, I am just never one to let well enough alone, so in addition to the 3.75lb can of HME I threw in a pouch of Smooth LME. Other wise I brewed it precisely as instructed.

 

Boy, those little guys from Safbrew went to town and the Krausen was as far as it could go and stay in the LBK.

 

Anyway, enough small talk. I unlike some of you, I prefer to rack my beer off the yeast into a brightening vessel (also known as a secondary) and additionally I batch prime, simply for no other reason than I like my beer to be as clear as I can get (short of "fining"). Reading the thread on the community pre-sale I noticed it was put out that the spice contained orange and clove. I love orange and clove flavors in my beer!

 

My concern: by adding the smooth LME is there any potential of pushing down the orange/clove (and other spice) flavors? Would putting fresh orange zest (sanitized of course) into the brightening container be too much? Or should I just use some sanitized tongs and transfer the spice pouch over to the secondary?

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First off, welcome to the community!! :D

The small amount of LME shouldn't dilute the spices too much. But it wouldn't hurt to add more orange peel to your secondary, if you wished. I've "dry-hopped" with orange peels before with great success (I also like doing this with grapefruit zest in my citrusy IPAs). You can also transfer the spice bag, but I don't think you'll need to since most of the spice has been pretty much extracted from the bag at that point.

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This dry orange peeling sounds a good idea. I would like to try that too. Please respond for amounts using dried or fresh peel.

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While I'm at the top of the forum list, let me throw out a couple of more questions about this brew.

 

Any harm in letting this sit 4 weeks in primary before racking off the yeast? It's sitting in a nice cool dark corner of my basement and after three days the temp of the LBK is hovering right around 64deg F. Fermintis.com says the optimal range of Safbrew T-58 is 59-68 so I'm dead in the middle there. I'd like the ABV to get as high as possible, but don't want it to sit too long and start getting wierd flavors. It will sit in secondary vessel for another month before bottling.

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4 weeks won't hurt anything, and likely will not change the ABV at all.  Sitting in a secondary is totally unnecessary and won't accomplish anything in my opinion.  Make sure if you do it that it's either very close to full or you have a way to put a layer of CO2 on it.

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Rickbeer, I understand your stance on racking to secondary. It's my personal preference (why we homebrew at all right?). However I will say I've used LBKs as secondary containers several times and had no issues with headspace and no need to go to any exotic measures involving CO2.

 

To me, it is basically the same end result as cold-crashing, only I don't have the space in my fridge or an extra fridge for that purpose. I guarauntee you that my brightened, batch-primed beer gets as good a result as cold crashing. Additionally, if I want to add adjuncts, using a secondary provides an easy way to do so without the possibilty of the High Krausen taking things for a turn.

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Wow. That should be one healthy brew. I think I typically put about 2.5 to 3 lbs of fermentables in a batch to make 2.5 gallons at close to 5.0% ABV. You'll have to let us know how this one turns out.

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Thank you sir!

 

Orange zest it is. Any ball-park estimates on how much?

About a tbsp. Or about as much as a small/medium orange.

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Just a newbie question as I have this beer in my que as well due to the sale.  When you say orange zest we are talking about using a micro grater on the outside of an orange skin, or are we talking orange peel as Josh mentioned in his first reply?  If just the grated zest, do you put it in a hop bag or how do you put it into the batch and how do you sanitize zest, just spray the orange before you grate it?  Was thinking of doing this as well and/or a cinnamon stick (would 1 stick be too much or too little or just right, or is dropping a stick in the wort a bad idea?)  

 

Please keep up posted on the brew Ohsigmachi, I enjoy the posts that take us through the steps of a brew start to finish.

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When I say "orange peel", I mean "zest".

You could bring a small pot of water up to 170°, cut the heat and add the zest to pasteurize it, but that may destroy much of the flavor/aroma. I use a shot of vodka. Just enough to cover the small amount of zest used. let it soak for a couple of hours then add it to your fermenter. If you want, you can add the small amount of vodka, too, as it now has a good amount of flavor added to it from the oils of the zest. That small amount of vodka won't affect your beer.  You could use a hop sack, but it's probably not necessary since the peel will precipitate to the bottom with the trub. Be sure when peeling, that you don't get any of the white pith as it will provide unwanted bitterness.

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You definitely want only the orange part, it would be a pithy if you got deeper...

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Thanks Josh and Rick, I assumed just the "zest", but wanted to clarify, I like the vodka idea, had not thought of that.

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When I say "orange peel", I mean "zest".

You could bring a small pot of water up to 170°, cut the heat and add the zest to pasteurize it, but that may destroy much of the flavor/aroma. I use a shot of vodka. Just enough to cover the small amount of zest used. let it soak for a couple of hours then add it to your fermenter. If you want, you can add the small amount of vodka, too, as it now has a good amount of flavor added to it from the oils of the zest. That small amount of vodka won't affect your beer. You could use a hop sack, but it's probably not necessary since the peel will precipitate to the bottom with the trub. Be sure when peeling, that you don't get any of the white pith as it will provide unwanted bitterness.

Was planning on adding corriander at flame out, but would there be any advantage to adding it to the vodka/zest steep?

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Was planning on adding corriander at flame out, but would there be any advantage to adding it to the vodka/zest steep?

The coriander would benefit in the same way as the zest.

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If anyone was interested in what I'm doing with mine; I'm soaking the zest of one orange with a few whole cloves in 2-3oz of Kraken black rum, I plan on heating that up, lighting it on fire and then putting that in the secondary (after extinguishing the flames of course.)

 

The whole fire thing serves a thee-fold purpose (if you've ever made flaming rum punch you'll already know this.)

 

First it drops the alcohol content in the rum (usually flaming rum punch is made with higher proof rum than Kraken), second it toasts the cloves a bit (the longer you let it burn the toastier they get, but too long and they get ashy), third it brings out the citrus notes of the oranges.

 

Yes, this is what happens when a bartender makes beer...

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If anyone was interested in what I'm doing with mine; I'm soaking the zest of one orange with a few whole cloves in 2-3oz of Kraken black rum, I plan on heating that up, lighting it on fire and then putting that in the secondary (after extinguishing the flames of course.)

 

The whole fire thing serves a thee-fold purpose (if you've ever made flaming rum punch you'll already know this.)

 

First it drops the alcohol content in the rum (usually flaming rum punch is made with higher proof rum than Kraken), second it toasts the cloves a bit (the longer you let it burn the toastier they get, but too long and they get ashy), third it brings out the citrus notes of the oranges.

 

Yes, this is what happens when a bartender makes beer...

Very interesting! Let us know how it turns out!

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Very interesting! Let us know how it turns out!

Will do! Probably won't open the first bottle until November for Thanksgiving, but I'll be back around.

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Will do! Probably won't open the first bottle until November for Thanksgiving, but I'll be back around.

We'll still be here. ;)

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I did the orange thingy with my Belgian ale, now  when I did it I might ah got confused, I think I included everything and the seeds, haha, I maybe dumb but i'm not stupid! I just threw in the seeds!!!

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Zombie thread back from the dead!!

 

So I opened up a tester bottle of this brew that was bottled on March 15th. Holy Whole Cloves Batman!

 

I'll have to call this brew "Cloven Hoofed Devil" because it has a ton of clove flavor (both in the nose and on the palate), and it packs a serious wallup of alcohol as well.

 

If I were ever to have the chance to make this again (which I probably won't because I have enough ingredients on hand to brew 20 gallons of beer! and none of it is the probabaly soon to run out seasonal) I would use more sweet orange peel and less cloves.

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Yeah cloves are easy to over do. If I may, you might also add some Saphir hops to you flavor and aroma boils, it'll add a tangerine flavor.  Combining with the sweet peel should net a good orange flavor.(IMO)

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