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spatu

Noche de luna recipe any tips?

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Hi everybody,

 

I am going to brew the Noche de Luna recipe, I was just wondering if you have any suggestions on temp or using a different yest instead of the Mr.beer one provided with the aztec refill.

 

Thanks to whomever would like to add his "voice" to the conversation!

 

 

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well as far as temps go... most wheat yeasts give a clove taste at lower range temps and banana at higher range temps. 

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Regarding Noche de Luna, I noticed that the description says it has a packet of wheat yeast under the lid.  I have to believe that's a typo because the standard Aztec does not have wheat yeast.  And since the LME that comes with the recipe is not the wheat LME, would it make sense to include wheat yeast?

 

I have a can of Aztec that I was condering buying the remaining ingredients to make Noche de Luna so I'm interested to know if it's truly supposed to use wheat yeast.  The other question I have is if the Tettnanger hops are US or German.

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Pretty clear that recipe has some typing issues.  If you don't see a response on the forum from a rep (they don't work weekends), email customerservice@mrbeer.com and you should get a same day response.  

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I just sent them an email, by the way, the recipe was unavailable on the website because basically they didn't have the hops.

I bought the hops on another website and I got the aztec refill and the other LME packs.

 

So, I got the yeast under the Aztec refill lid....

 

That's the recipe:

 

RECIPE INCLUDES: 

1 Can Aztec Mexican Cerveza HME 
1 Packet Dry Wheat Brewing Yeast (under lid of HME) 
2 BrewMax LME SoftPack - Smooth 
1 1.2 oz. Packet Tettnanger Pellet Hops 
1 Muslin Hop Sack 
1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser

 

 

  1. Remove the yeast packet from under the lid of the can of hopped malt extract (HME), then place the unopened can and both LME softpacks in hot tap water.a
  2. Place contents of the pellet hops packet into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material. 
  3. Using the sanitized measuring cup, pour 4 cups of water into your clean 3-quart or larger pot. 
  4. Bring mixture to a boil, add in the hop sack, b then remove from heat. Open the can of HME c and both LMEs, pour contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called wort. 
  5. Fill keg with cold tap water to the 4-quart mark on the back. d 
  6. Pour the wort into the keg, and then bring the volume of the keg to the 8.5-quart mark by adding more cold water. Stir vigorously with the spoon or whisk. e 
  7. Sprinkle the yeast packet into the keg, and screw on the lid. Do not stir. 
  8. Put your keg in a location with a consistent temperature between 68° and 76° F (20°-25° C), ideally about 70° F and out of direct sunlight. f Ferment for 14 days. g 
  9. After approximately 24 hours, you will be able to see the fermentation process happening by shining a flashlight into the keg. You’ll see the yeast in action in the wort. The liquid will be opaque and milky, you will see bubbles rising in the liquid, and there will be bubbles on the surface. 

Your fermentation will usually reach its peak in 2 to 5 days (this is also known as “high krausen”). You may see a layer of foam on top of the wort, and sediment will accumulate at the bottom of the fermenter. This is totally normal. Complete fermentation will take approximately 2 weeks. 

After high krausen the foam and activity will subside and your batch will appear to be dormant. Your beer is still fermenting. The yeast is still at work slowly finishing the fermentation process.

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Unless someone has made the recipe, only Customer Service knows the answer to that.

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spatu, on 15 Feb 2015 - 6:26 PM, said:

So do you think I need wheat yeast?

That would really depend on what you want out of the brew, not me.  I was just remarking that to follow the recipe as posted...However, since ask my opinion, I think it'd make for an interesting cerveza (different strokes for different folks).

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Wheat yeast is not required for this recipe. I'm pretty sure that's a typo and I appreciate you bringing it to our attention. It will be fixed promptly.

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They aren't much different, but I believe our are US. But we have stopped carrying them.

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This recipe has been updated with the yeast fix. Thanks again for bringing this to our attention.

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Why would you use wheat yeast if you do not have wheat malt in the recipe?

It was a Typo.

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Depends on the yeast. I use S-05 which is very clean. Doing a Blue Moon clone and a wheat fruit beer in a few weeks.

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05 over attenuates a wheat(unless your brewing a Kristalweizen) and leaves the clear instead of cloudy. Your really better off using S-33 for an American Wheat and 05 for everything else.

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Wheat yeast is not required for this recipe. I'm pretty sure that's a typo and I appreciate you bringing it to our attention. It will be fixed promptly.

1. Remove the yeast packet from under the lid of the can of hopped malt extract (HME), then place the unopened can and both LME softpacks in hot tap water.a

2.Place contents of the pellet hops packet into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material.

3. Using the sanitized measuring cup, pour 4 cups of water into your clean 3-quart or larger pot.

4. Bring mixture to a boil, add in the hop sack, b then remove from heat. Open the can of HME c and both LMEs, pour contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called wort.

Why add the hops to the boiling water before the LME/HME? I was under the impression boiling hops in anything other than an LME/DME would just make hop tea and bring nothing to the beer? I'm assuming with this recipe the hops are adding flavor and would require a flavor boil (sorry can't find the graph) in the LME before adding the HME.

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You're not boiling the hops. They are in the boiling water, by themselves, for a short period to sanitize the sack.

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You're not boiling the hops. They are in the boiling water, by themselves, for a short period to sanitize the sack.

Ohhhhh.... Don't I feel stupid?

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Wonder how this recipe would taste with a 20 minute flavor boil in the LME before adding the HME.

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sabres032, on 16 Feb 2015 - 10:22 PM, said:sabres032, on 16 Feb 2015 - 10:22 PM, said:sabres032, on 16 Feb 2015 - 10:22 PM, said:

Wonder how this recipe would taste with a 20 minute flavor boil in the LME before adding the HME.

While I have no problem with the general idea... Brew it straight the first time, always. You need a base line for comparison.

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While I have no problem with the general idea... Brew it straight the first time, always. You need a base line for comparison.

While its soooooo tempting to alter a recipe to your belief of more/better flavor, if you haven't actually made/tasted it before, it's IMPOSSIBLE for you to know what to add. (or subtract)

 

One of the worst parts is the waiting... believe me I know.  However, a bigger downside, is making a bad beer.

 

So make a recipe.  Follow it precisely.  Taste it.  Let others taste it.  THEN make your adjustments.  You might find that its actually perfect.

 

In another thread I took the uncle monkey's dunkel and blindly added maple syrup to it.  However, I also made the correct recipe at the exact same time.

It wasn't so much an attempt to make a change to beer but an experiment to see what the syrup did to the flavor.

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It says 4-8 weeks lagering time. Has anyone figured the time to their satisfaction? I figure 6 weeks in the LBK then 3 for carbonation in the bottles, and finish with two in the fridge?

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It also say fermentation will be done in two weeks. Is their lagering time counting the time in the bottles while it's carbonating? How should I do this?

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run, I would do 3 weeks in the LBK and 4-8 weeks in the bottle. I wouldn't go 6 weeks in the LBK due the chance of off flavors. "Lager" in this sense means to store.

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It says 4-8 weeks lagering time. Has anyone figured the time to their satisfaction? I figure 6 weeks in the LBK then 3 for carbonation in the bottles, and finish with two in the fridge?

Time to do some reading...

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3 weeks in the LBK,  4 weeks in the bottles @ room temp.(minimum) out of direct sunlight, 3 days in the fridge. only cool a bottle or 2, you may find 4 weeks ain't enough for your tastes. Longer in the bottle at room temp is better, with but few exceptions. 

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