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DEFIBRILLATOR DOPPELBOCK TURNED OUT GREAT!

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BREWED THIS BATCH ON 11 JAN AND BOTTLED IT ON 31 JAN. THE RECOMMENDED EDD IS 4 JULY. I HAD ONE SMALL BOTTLE SET ASIDE SPECIFICALLY TO SEE HOW THINGS WERE PROGRESSING WITHOUT DISTURBING BOTTLES INTENDED FOR CONSUMPTION.

HOWEVER, I DECIDED TO OPEN THE SMALL SAMPLE BOTTLE ON FRIDAY NIGHT AFTER JUST HAVING FINISHED BREWING A BELGIUM SPICED ALE, JUST FOR A QUICK TASTE. TO MY SURPRISE IT WAS ABSOLUTELY GREAT. SO I PUT TWO IN THE FRIDGE. I HAD 1/2 OF A LITER BOTTLE WITH DINNER. FOLKS, I AM HOOKED. IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY BOCK BIER I HAVE EVER HAD. EVER.

 

I AM HOWEVER GONNA RESTRAIN MYSELF AND TASTE NO MORE UNTIL FULLY CONDITIONED!

CAN'T HELP BUT WONDER HOW GOOD THEY WILL BE IN FIVE MONTHS AFTER THE RECOMMENDED CONDITIONING TIME?

 

IS MY EXPERIENCE UNIQUE? :wub:

 

I MEAN IT HAS ONLY BEEN TWO WEEKS IN THE BOTTLE.

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Glad you had some outstanding beer. No you are not unique, some yeast will take off and condition in about 2 weeks and some yeast will lay around and do anything for 4 weeks. The only thing I can say if you think your beer is good now try at 4 weeks should be a lot better. CHEERS WE HAVE BEER!

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I agree.  If it is a good beer, it may be good early.  If it is good early, it will be outstanding if you let it sit longer.  My Oktoberfest was great while bottling, it was good at 3 weeks, and it is even better at 4.  I have no doubt that particular beer will get even better if I have any at 6 months.  A lighter beer may not age as well after a certain point (obviously after the initial 4-5 weeks conditioning period).  I routinely buy dark beers (bocks, barleywines, and the like) and let them sit for two or 3 years sometimes.  They just get better and better.

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I agree.  If it is a good beer, it may be good early.  If it is good early, it will be outstanding if you let it sit longer.  My Oktoberfest was great while bottling, it was good at 3 weeks, and it is even better at 4.  I have no doubt that particular beer will get even better if I have any at 6 months.  A lighter beer may not age as well after a certain point (obviously after the initial 4-5 weeks conditioning period).  I routinely buy dark beers (bocks, barleywines, and the like) and let them sit for two or 3 years sometimes.  They just get better and better.

WOW!!  NEVER EXPECTED THIS GOOD OF A RESULT. 

 

AGAIN, MY BIGGEST PROBLEM WILL BE TO LEAVE IT ALONE UNTIL FULLY CONDITIONED.  I REALLY FOLLOWED THIS RECIPE TO THE LETTER.  I WAS EXTRA, EXTRA CAUTIOUS AFTER I HAD THOUGHT I SCREWED UP MY INITIAL BATCH BY GETTING WATERS MIXED UP.

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I have dark beers that after tasting once the 4 wks. conditioning I have let sit and plan on opening this summer sometime. I started this brewing session back in Aug of 2014. so expecting good things with the beer and sharing with buddies.

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I agree.  If it is a good beer, it may be good early.  If it is good early, it will be outstanding if you let it sit longer.  My Oktoberfest was great while bottling, it was good at 3 weeks, and it is even better at 4.  I have no doubt that particular beer will get even better if I have any at 6 months.  A lighter beer may not age as well after a certain point (obviously after the initial 4-5 weeks conditioning period).  I routinely buy dark beers (bocks, barleywines, and the like) and let them sit for two or 3 years sometimes.  They just get better and better.

JUST CURIOUS.  ANY PARTICULAR REASON WHY LIGHTER BEERS DO NOT AGE AS WELL AFTER A CERTAIN POINT IN TIME THAN DO DARKER BEERS? 

 

IS THIS YOUR OPINION, YOUR EXPERIENCE OR SOMETHING BASED IN FERMENTATION CHEMISTRY FACT?

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Darker, maltier beer is better for aging because the sweet, residual sugars tend to soften over time, as do any harsh or astringent roasty notes. Aging these beers can result in a velvety smooth mouthfeel and complex flavors. Even lower-alcohol beers with a malt-heavy profile will age better than lighter beers. But there are many lighter beers that will also benefit from aging, especially Belgian ales and saisons. Aging these beers will round out the spicy notes they are known for.

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Darker, maltier beer is better for aging because the sweet, residual sugars tend to soften over time, as do any harsh or astringent roasty notes. Aging these beers can result in a velvety smooth mouthfeel and complex flavors. Even lower-alcohol beers with a malt-heavy profile will age better than lighter beers. But there are many lighter beers that will also benefit from aging, especially Belgian ales and saisons. Aging these beers will round out the spicy notes they are known for.

THANX FOR THE QUICK REPLY.  I'M REALLY BENEFITTING FROM THE KNOWLEDGE EXPOUSED IN THIS FORUM!  LOOKING FORWARD TO THE OTHER ALES AND STOUTS I NOW HAVE IN MY GROWING PIPELINE.  WILL POST A FEW PICTURES OF THE DEFIBRILATOR DOPPLEBOCK LATER TODAY.

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That's why I doubt the story about why they brewed IPAs.  Any Porter or Stout would've made the trip just fine.

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That's why I doubt the story about why they brewed IPAs.  Any Porter or Stout would've made the trip just fine.

I agree. The IPA story is mostly myth. Beer didn't need to be strong to survive the journey to India, and IPAs were not particularly strong for the time: they were only about 6% to 6.5% ABV. Certainly by the 1760s brewers were being told that it was “absolutely necessary” to add extra hops to beer if it was being sent to somewhere warm. But this was not limited to India. Here's a good article on the truth about the origin of IPAs:

http://www.beerconnoisseur.com/the-origins-of-ipa

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THIS BATCH JUST GETS BETTER WITH TIME.  ONLY HAVE 10 BOTTLES LEFT.  GONNA RESIST TEMPTATION AND STICK WITH MY "HOP HEAD RED" FOR NOW WHICH WAS IN FACT EARLIER IN THE PIPELINE ROTATION. I AM GOING TO ATTEMPT TO VIDEO RECORD THE NEXT BATCH OF "HIP HOP RED" I BREW. 

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I agree. The IPA story is mostly myth. Beer didn't need to be strong to survive the journey to India, and IPAs were not particularly strong for the time: they were only about 6% to 6.5% ABV. Certainly by the 1760s brewers were being told that it was “absolutely necessary” to add extra hops to beer if it was being sent to somewhere warm. But this was not limited to India. Here's a good article on the truth about the origin of IPAs:

http://www.beerconnoisseur.com/the-origins-of-ipa

I dug these up a few months ago:

 

The British Trade Journal and Export World, Volume 19 (  c. 1881)
Pale ale, or, as it was first termed, "India Pale Ale"...
The fact is indisputable and undisputed that the inventor of the healthy and invigorating drink once known as "India Pale Ale" was a Mr. Hodgson...and at one time no other malt liquor was drunk...in Calcutta.
 
All the year round (A Weekly Journal conducted by Charles Dickens   c. 1890)
The cause of all the commotion...was East India Pale Ale, and many strange tales have been told of it's origin...a consignment of beer sent out in a cloudy
condition, which, after travelling round the world, came back...in a condition
so excellent, bright, and sparkling...
 
The Law Reports: Chancery Division, and on appeal therefrom in ..., Volume 18 (  c. 1880)
...to sell to them only a kind of bitter ale, known in the trade as "I.P.A.", ...This beer was retailed by publicans as "Pale Ale"...
 
Household Words, Volume 7 (conducted by Charles Dickens   c. 1858)
...ordered his butler to bring a bottle of India Ale which had been to India and back..."There, sir," conculded Sir John. "That's the true legend of pale ale..."

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BREWED THIS BATCH ON 11 JAN AND BOTTLED IT ON 31 JAN. THE RECOMMENDED EDD IS 4 JULY. I HAD ONE SMALL BOTTLE SET ASIDE SPECIFICALLY TO SEE HOW THINGS WERE PROGRESSING WITHOUT DISTURBING BOTTLES INTENDED FOR CONSUMPTION.

HOWEVER, I DECIDED TO OPEN THE SMALL SAMPLE BOTTLE ON FRIDAY NIGHT AFTER JUST HAVING FINISHED BREWING A BELGIUM SPICED ALE, JUST FOR A QUICK TASTE. TO MY SURPRISE IT WAS ABSOLUTELY GREAT. SO I PUT TWO IN THE FRIDGE. I HAD 1/2 OF A LITER BOTTLE WITH DINNER. FOLKS, I AM HOOKED. IT WAS AS GOOD AS ANY BOCK BIER I HAVE EVER HAD. EVER.

 

I AM HOWEVER GONNA RESTRAIN MYSELF AND TASTE NO MORE UNTIL FULLY CONDITIONED!

CAN'T HELP BUT WONDER HOW GOOD THEY WILL BE IN FIVE MONTHS AFTER THE RECOMMENDED CONDITIONING TIME?

 

IS MY EXPERIENCE UNIQUE? :wub:

 

I MEAN IT HAS ONLY BEEN TWO WEEKS IN THE BOTTLE.

I generally try to "loose" a few bottles of most batches

to find later

Specially Stouts, Saisons, higher ABV beers

Found a stout that was 53 weeks old back in February

It was by far the best stout Ive ever had

And way better than what I had at 6 months

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I generally try to "loose" a few bottles of most batches

to find later

Specially Stouts, Saisons, higher ABV beers

Found a stout that was 53 weeks old back in February

It was by far the best stout Ive ever had

And way better than what I had at 6 months

+1 I still got 4 bottles of a high gravity brew I  bottled  last july

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Sorta reminds me of this (from Pattinson's book):

“The cause of all the commotion in the brewing trade was East India pale ale, and many strange tales have been told of its origin, all of which refer to a consignment of beer sent out in a cloudy condition, which, after travelling round the world, came back to the country of its birth, in a condition so excellent, bright and sparkling, that it was said to be superior to a glass of Madeira or sparkling champagne.”

—Noted Breweries of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. 2, Alfred Barnard, 1889, pages 421–422

 

 

 

 

EDIT: Sorry, I just noticed an abbreviated version of this quote cited in an earlier post. Interesting that Dickens quoted it too, this is a fascinatng subject to me.

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