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BeastYeast

Advice on Next Two Batches Please

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My first batch of standard Classic American Light is in it's second week of bottling and my second batch of St. Patricks Irish Stout with robust LME and booster packet is coming up on it's third week in fermentation. I was thinking of playing around with some hops now and would appreciate any input. Here are my ideas for my next two batches.

 

1st Batch

 

1 HME Classic American Light

1 DME Pale

1 Packet Booster

1/2ounce Columbus Hops

Whole packet of Safale US-05

 

3weeks fermentation - 5 weeks bottle - 1week fridge

 

2nd Batch

 

1 HME St. Patricks Irish Stout

1 HME Winter Dark Ale

1 DME Smooth

1 Can Dark Sweet Cherries in Syrup

1/2ounce cascade hops

1/2ounce glacier hops

Whole packet of Safale US-50

 

3weeks fermentation - 2-3months bottle - 1week fridge

 

As I have no experience with hops I'm not sure on dosage and I'm going off their description on flavor/aroma. I'm worried that the second batch might have too little hops. Ideas?

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1)- There is no accounting for taste.

2)- I'll mix just about anything together, if I feel in my gut they have the potential to harmonize.

3)- The results of said mixing may fit into no known category and be a whole new creature.

4)- That creature may be wonderful or it may be crap or it may be something in between.

5)- You'll never know until you try.

6)- Everyone has a different tolerance for risk.

7)- Only you know your own tolerance for risk, hopefully.

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1)- There is no accounting for taste.

2)- I'll mix just about anything together, if I feel in my gut they have the potential to harmonize.

3)- The results of said mixing may fit into no known category and be a whole new creature.

4)- That creature may be wonderful or it may be crap or it may be something in between.

5)- You'll never know until you try.

6)- Everyone has a different tolerance for risk.

7)- Only you know your own tolerance for risk, hopefully.

Is this accounting for both batches?

I would not mix Winter Dark and Irish Stout.

Would the American porter be a better match or is the winter dark better by itself?

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there's a recipe called staggerback bock in mr. beer, its a porter/irish stout mix, close to what beastyeast was talking about

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I never put two cans together. Waste of money, not as intended. Winter Dark is a great refill.

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I thot maybe on my bday next month I would mix a filet mignon and baked potato in a batch? now my concern is if I added the sour cream would it affect fermentation or conflict with the yeast? if I decide to do this tasky task, what hme would anyone recommend?

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Is this accounting for both batches?

Basically it goes for ANY batch. But more specifically, your first batch looks like a very safe bet to me, and I think it will be a fine beer. As for the Porter/Stout mix, you should consider the cash outlay you invest for each specific refill with all the work that went into making it exactly what it is, before morphing it with another equally expensive specific refill. Like I said, to each their own. I typically take one refill and stretch it or adapt it with some grains or plain extract and with some hops if desired. Sometimes I take 2 different HME's and combine them, especially if I got them on sale. I have no problem combining a Porter and a Stout to make a new beer. Some folks would never do that. It's an individual matter. You will hear many strong opinions both ways. Until you try it for yourself, you'll never know what YOUR opinion of it is. And after you do, YOURS will be the only opinion that matters.

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Basically it goes for ANY batch. But more specifically, your first batch looks like a very safe bet to me, and I think it will be a fine beer. As for the Porter/Stout mix, you should consider the cash outlay you invest for each specific refill with all the work that went into making it exactly what it is, before morphing it with another equally expensive specific refill. Like I said, to each their own. I typically take one refill and stretch it or adapt it with some grains or plain extract and with some hops if desired. Sometimes I take 2 different HME's and combine them, especially if I got them on sale. I have no problem combining a Porter and a Stout to make a new beer. Some folks would never do that. It's an individual matter. You will hear many strong opinions both ways. Until you try it for yourself, you'll never know what YOUR opinion of it is. And after you do, YOURS will be the only opinion that matters.

Understood, thanks.

Batch #1) How do you plan on using the hops?

Not sure yet I'm still doing research. The instructions say to add with fermentation in lbk. However, I've been reading about boil times and characteristics. Haven't found anything on the forum yet.

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post-59190-0-48963800-1424315649_thumb.j

 

Just general FYI from here out, boil the hops in the LME and water. Add the HME at flame out. Only do flavor and aroma additions.

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I would say the first with CAL is good as you suggest. I have not tried Columbus only Cascade which works well. I would add the hops dry in sterilized bag ad 1 week before bottling.

 

The 2nd will be a real heavy dark brew.  The Stout is quite well hopped IBU=50 (but it tastes more) , and the Dark Winter IBU=60 (look at IBU profiles in Mr B) , so I think you will have enough and you can use the hops you have for aroma - I like the dry hopping so I would do that.

 

I am sure there will be other opinions :-)

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Oh, I generally split the hops evenly between flavor and aroma

I'm right there with you on that. I'm way more into flavor and aroma than I am into bitter.

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Would the American porter be a better match or is the winter dark better by itself?

We have a recipe that uses the Winter Dark and the American Porter called Count Hopsulator (http://www.mrbeer.com/count-hopsulator-recipe) so I don't see why you couldn't use the Winter Dark with the Irish Stout. I would omit the LME Softpack though, especially if you're adding fruit and extra hops. Having all that malt in there could risk a huge mess. Unless you're using the 8Lx fermenter, I'd stay away from adding so much malt. The Winter dark is a Craft Series can so it has more malt in it than the standard cans. It's a big beer you're wanting to make, and it can be done, and will probably even taste really good, but I wouldn't do it in an LBK.

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My first batch of standard Classic American Light is in it's second week of bottling and my second batch of St. Patricks Irish Stout with robust LME and booster packet is coming up on it's third week in fermentation. I was thinking of playing around with some hops now and would appreciate any input. Here are my ideas for my next two batches.

 

1st Batch

 

1 HME Classic American Light

1 DME Pale

1 Packet Booster

1/2ounce Columbus Hops

Whole packet of Safale US-05

 

3weeks fermentation - 5 weeks bottle - 1week fridge

This looks like a nice recipe. Almost like a cream ale with the booster added. Let us know how it turns out. :)

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I would do a 15 minute boil with the DME and your hops.  That CAL needs some flavor help.

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For me, the dry hop is enough After a couple months, it gets a very floral aroma and delicateness. No head retention though on mine.

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For me, the dry hop is enough After a couple months, it gets a very floral aroma and delicateness. No head retention though on mine.

A 15 boil gives some flavor. aroma, and some bitterness.  All of which are missing from CAL.  The dry hop only gives aroma.

If he had more hops to work with, could do both lol.

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depends on the hops you use.  I have dry hopped with cascade and saaz, and never had a problem.  some hops are more grassy or vegetal than others. 

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I've had fresh, whole hops crushed and dropped in my beer and it didn't taste "grassy."

 

Some people don't like broccoli so I assume "grassy" is subjective.

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Vakko  I agree with you, 'cause it ain't just dropping them in that gets the grassy. It's leaving them in too long. I don't see how you'd get grassy from dropping a hop cone in a beer. Dry hop 4 or 5 days, then I get grassy taste.

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Unless you REALLY like heavy hops, I would start light and then brew  more batches increasing as you go until it is enough.

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Well what I was thinking was adding half an ounce to the beginning of a 15 min boil then another half ounce in the last 5 mins. It's probably best to start of light though.

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My first batch of standard Classic American Light is in it's second week of bottling and my second batch of St. Patricks Irish Stout with robust LME and booster packet is coming up on it's third week in fermentation. I was thinking of playing around with some hops now and would appreciate any input. Here are my ideas for my next two batches.

 

1st Batch

 

1 HME Classic American Light

1 DME Pale

1 Packet Booster

1/2ounce Columbus Hops

Whole packet of Safale US-05

 

3weeks fermentation - 5 weeks bottle - 1week fridge

 

2nd Batch

 

1 HME St. Patricks Irish Stout

1 HME Winter Dark Ale

1 DME Smooth

1 Can Dark Sweet Cherries in Syrup

1/2ounce cascade hops

1/2ounce glacier hops

Whole packet of Safale US-50

 

3weeks fermentation - 2-3months bottle - 1week fridge

 

As I have no experience with hops I'm not sure on dosage and I'm going off their description on flavor/aroma. I'm worried that the second batch might have too little hops. Ideas?

I have been brewing for the better part of 15  years and have experimented with many hop varieties in various quantities. If you would like to try something different, try some Nelson Sauvin hops in a single hop IPA. This unique variety presents a nice grassy, lemony beer. Give it a try!!

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Holy thread revival batman!

 

I did a 20 min boil with hops added at 20, 12 and 8 I believe. I need to check my notes as I changed my mind like 12 times. I only used columbus hops as well. I will be bottling the CAL after a 2 day cold crash this weekend.

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Holy thread revival batman!

 

I did a 20 min boil with hops added at 20, 12 and 8 I believe. I need to check my notes as I changed my mind like 12 times. I only used columbus hops as well. I will be bottling the CAL after a 2 day cold crash this weekend.

Save it in Qbrew.

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I have been brewing for the better part of 15  years and have experimented with many hop varieties in various quantities. If you would like to try something different, try some Nelson Sauvin hops in a single hop IPA. This unique variety presents a nice grassy, lemony beer. Give it a try!!

I agree! They are a very unique hop strain. Sometimes they give off grape notes, too (the name was derived from sauvignon, the wine). Very strange. New Zealand seems to have some of the most exotic and strange hops. I love it! Unfortunately, they can be difficult to find sometimes. Another favorite NZ hop is Pacific Jade. Citrusy and peppery, it's perfect for pale ales or IPAs. Motueka is another one to pick up if you see it. Tropical with lime notes, it's great in wheat beers. I even prefer the NZ Cascade to the American variety. It's a bit more grapefruity and slightly higher in alpha acids.

Here is a great resource if anyone wants to learn about these and other exotic New Zealand hops: http://www.nzhops.co.nz/varieties/index.html

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Agreed on the Pacific Jade. Just to add two more, try the Mouteka and the Green Bullet, both NZ hops. I recommend the Mouteka as a finishing hops and the Green Bullet as an all around hop if you are brewing an American Pale ale or less bitter IPA while staying away from Citrus Hops. Just fun to experiment with new things. I just completed a Gose beer in which I included 1/2 oz Kola Nut at bittering and 1/2 oz at aroma. Unknown outcome but that is half the fun, drinking being the other half.

 

Cheers to all

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The gose style is quickly becoming one of my favorites. What was your recipe if you don't mind my asking?

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Steeped at 160 for 15 min.

.75 lbs Acidulated malt

.25 peat smoked malt

 

Remove grains and sparge. Bring wort to a boil and add the following;

 

3.3 lbs liquid malt extract

3.3 lbs liquid light malt extract

 

Hops

.5 oz green bullet 60 min boil

.5 oz green bullet 30 min boil

1.0 oz Sorachi Ace 10 min boil

 

1/4 tsp irish moss at 15 min boil.

 

Last 10 min of boil added 1/2 oz crushed coriander and 1/2 oz course sea salt.

 

I pitched a packet of dry weizen yeast. 

 

This recipe is for a 2.5 gallon batch of Gose beer. I fermented it in my Mr. Beer fermenter. Be cautious using the weizen yeast as it is insanely active and can leak all over the place.

 

Enjoy and let me know how it turns out!!

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Seems like that's enough LME for a 5 gallon batch.  1 x 3.3 LME and 1 lbs DME usually puts me at 1.07 OG (from memory).  Where was your OG with this?

 

Edit: 1.078 above.

 

The Pointhunter, what's "malt extract" did you mean to type "wheat malt extract".  For this to go into a Mr.B lbk this would be 1.097 post boil OG.  That seems a high for a Gose.  I'm only asking because I'm interested, not trying to be argumentative.

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Steeped at 160 for 15 min.

.75 lbs Acidulated malt

.25 peat smoked malt

 

Remove grains and sparge. Bring wort to a boil and add the following;

 

3.3 lbs liquid malt extract

3.3 lbs liquid light malt extract

 

Hops

.5 oz green bullet 60 min boil

.5 oz green bullet 30 min boil

1.0 oz Sorachi Ace 10 min boil

 

1/4 tsp irish moss at 15 min boil.

 

Last 10 min of boil added 1/2 oz crushed coriander and 1/2 oz course sea salt.

 

I pitched a packet of dry weizen yeast. 

 

This recipe is for a 2.5 gallon batch of Gose beer. I fermented it in my Mr. Beer fermenter. Be cautious using the weizen yeast as it is insanely active and can leak all over the place.

 

Enjoy and let me know how it turns out!!

Very nice! I LOVE gose beers. Nice touch with the Sorachi Ace. Not sure how I feel about the peated malt, though.

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Without the wheat and besides the salt what else is giving it it's gosiness?

The lemon notes from the Sorachi Ace and the lactic acid from the acidulated malt.

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