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Rick N

Temperature VS time

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I'm getting ready to brew some Defibrillator Dopplebock. The instruction say to keep the temperature between 68-76 degrees. Because of the location I brew in the temperature reaches 72 and falls as low as 62 during the night. The time for this brew is stated to be about two weeks.

If I brew this batch for 3 weeks will it still provide the need fermentation? Also several people said that adding brow sugar instead granulated adds a lot of flavor to this recipe. When and how is the sugar added? When? Is this used for the carbonation or is it in addition to the sugar added at bottling time? 

 

Sorry for running on, but this is all new to me and I am learning from the best.

 

Rick N. B)

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You need to keep it at a consistent temperature. 10 degree swings like you have will negatively affect your fermentation.

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I think I counted 13 questions but I will try to hit them all:

  1. The more consistent your temperature is, the more consistent your flavor will be
  2. Additionally, the colder the temp, the slower the fermentation and if you're too low, your yeast will actually "go to sleep."
  3. 2 weeks is the minimum time required to make alcohol.  however, it doesn't mean it will be done primary fermentation.  3 weeks is much better. (BTW, it says MAKES APPROX. 2 GALLONS OF BEER IN ABOUT 3 WEEKS.)
  4. "A lot of flavor" is very subjective.  Any sugar additive during primary fermentation will almost be entirely consumed and therefore leave very little residual taste behind.
  5. The later you add a sugar in the process, the greater your chance to retain flavor from it.  There are no guarantees.

 

I would recommend you make the beer according to the recipe first.  Then, IF, you decided to make it again, you can make changes based on your own taste preferences.

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Thank you both for the sage advice. I will put this information in my Brewers guide book.

 

Still learning

 

Rick N.

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Temperature swings are not good for fermentation. See if you can find a more consistent temperature. Brown sugar may add a small amount of flavor, but if you add large amounts of sugar it could have negative effects on the beer. Most likely it would be added as a fermentable sugar at the time the wort is prepared, not for priming.

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