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3 weeks fermenting down, 4 weeks to go...

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Hey everybody! So, Ive read all of the intro info so far. I am making my first batch ever. I used to make wine with my grandfather as a kid. So, this seemed like an obvious hobby for me. My brother gave me an LBK kit of American light for Christmas. I had a hydrometer already (not exactly sure if I have the proper chamber for usage.) Nevertheless, my question lies within cold crashing. Does one cold crash American Light for 3 days

or less? I am receptive to all possible outcomes. Also, I have the worlds smallest fridge, is there a better way?

Thanks guys,

M.

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Cold crashing is at least a day to solidify the trub, 3 days if you want the beer to clear up with particles settling (see link below).

 

Any frig works if it fits.  

 

The only reasons to cold crash are to a) solidify the trub and get more beer out of the LBK and 2) clarify the beer.

 

Read the link about propping up the LBK also. 

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Cold crashing is at least a day to solidify the trub, 3 days if you want the beer to clear up with particles settling (see link below).

 

Any frig works if it fits.  

 

The only reasons to cold crash are to a) solidify the trub and get more beer out of the LBK and 2) clarify the beer.

 

Read the link about propping up the LBK also.

The trub appears pretty solid at the bottom already. Is this normal? When I did my test with the hydrometer today, I pulled roughly 4.5-4.7% I think. Also, the beer was seemingly clear already? Maybe this was only due to pulling a small amount of beer? I read the propping the LBK already (I need to reread.) I have it slightly propped, but the trub seems pretty solid and significantly below the spigot. Thank you Rick!

Thank you Jim!

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It may be below the spigot, but as soon as you tilt the LBK to get the last few ounces out it will flow. It will also stir up easy.

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Ingredients (types)

density (volume of ingredients per 8.5L)

temperature of fermentation (colder usually means clearer)

 

Really important:  did you shake your LBK? lol   B)

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Ingredients (types)

density (volume of ingredients per 8.5L)

temperature of fermentation (colder usually means clearer)

 

Really important:  did you shake your LBK? lol   B)

Lol no I did not shake it. However, I did read that the solution would be cloudy and it's seemingly clear.

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I guess every observation is subjective.  While you might be able to see through your keg as if it were clear, if you held a flashlight to sample, you would probably see a bunch of "particulate" moving around.  Everything from yeast to proteins and fats can be in the solution at any time trying to "settle out" to the bottom and become trub.

 

I see you have the CAL (classic american light).  Going back to my list #1 says ingredients.  CAL is very light colored in appearance so its easier to see through.  #2 is density.  You only have the 1 can of CAL in 8.5L of solution.  So it's a lot easier: 1) finish fermentation 2) settle out

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I guess every observation is subjective.  While you might be able to see through your keg as if it were clear, if you held a flashlight to sample, you would probably see a bunch of "particulate" moving around.  Everything from yeast to proteins and fats can be in the solution at any time trying to "settle out" to the bottom and become trub.

 

I see you have the CAL (classic american light).  Going back to my list #1 says ingredients.  CAL is very light colored in appearance so its easier to see through.  #2 is density.  You only have the 1 can of CAL in 8.5L of solution.  So it's a lot easier: 1) finish fermentation 2) settle out

Thank you for the help. One last dumb question... Is it a bad idea to use glass bottles during the carbonation period?

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Thank you for the help. One last dumb question... Is it a bad idea to use glass bottles during the carbonation period?

 

????  Most people use glass bottles.  Did you mean something else?

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????  Most people use glass bottles.  Did you mean something else?

No, I just saw where several ppl experienced explosions and I didn't want to clean up the glass. I figured it would be fine, but I wanted to be as thorough as possible. (End of dumb questions...)

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Ha!  Yah my wife hates that I have glass bottles still.  But once I switched from 2 week fermentation to 3, I haven't had 1 bottle bomb (explosion) since.

 

Basically, my yeast was still very active producing a lot of CO2 rapidly (more so than in the carbonation phase).  Then I would add my priming sugar (basically pouring gas on a raging fire instead of pouring it hot coals).

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Ha!  Yah my wife hates that I have glass bottles still.  But once I switched from 2 week fermentation to 3, I haven't had 1 bottle bomb (explosion) since.

 

Basically, my yeast was still very active producing a lot of CO2 rapidly (more so than in the carbonation phase).  Then I would add my priming sugar (basically pouring gas on a raging fire instead of pouring it hot coals).

Precisely what I'm trying to avoid... Thank you for your help and the in depth explanations. Exactly the information that I was seeking. Glass is king!

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Keep in mind that people with problems post in forums.  People that don't have issues don't tend to talk about it.

 

Bottle bombs are rare.  They sometimes occur because people bottle before fermentation is done.

 

I bought 4 file boxes at Staples (free after Staples Rewards) and I put my bottles in 12 packs or a case and then in the box.  Anything explodes - no problem and no mess on wood floor in pantry that SWMBO would not be amused at.  I use one PET bottle each batch to test for firmness.  

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Keep in mind that people with problems post in forums.  People that don't have issues don't tend to talk about it.

 

Bottle bombs are rare.  They sometimes occur because people bottle before fermentation is done.

 

I bought 4 file boxes at Staples (free after Staples Rewards) and I put my bottles in 12 packs or a case and then in the box.  Anything explodes - no problem and no mess on wood floor in pantry that SWMBO would not be amused at.  I use one PET bottle each batch to test for firmness.

Affirmative!

I'll keep that in mind. I've got my brew bottled in growlers and stashed away in a cooler. I'll be obtaining a file box soon. So, what would be a good brew to graduate to next? I pretty much like everything. IPA and Pils preferred, lots of crafts, some lager, the ol' lady likes ciders, darker beers are good but I can't drink many of them.

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If you burp them you will have flat beer. I would put them in a cooler or tub with lid and hope for the best. It is unfortunate that you used growlers.

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Can he just transfer the beer to carbonation-safe bottles? In that situation, I'd try transferring the beer and after several days if the new (plastic) bottles were not firming up, adding a bit more carbonating sugar. Not sure if that would work, but probably what I'd try. 

 

I'd get the beer out of the growlers one way or another.

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Transferring the beer from the growlers to bottles will likely aerate the beer, creating off flavors.  IMHO, at this point the beer should stay put and he should hope that they both hold the carbonation and don't explode.  Maybe he'll get lucky.

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while he probably won't be out much, if you transfer bottle to bottle you risk aeration and adding sugar can be a very messy experience.

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Well, this news is a little late, but with great success. I put all the bottles and growlers into a cooler and No growler bombs!! The beer turned out splendid.

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Curious though, Has this is  a question I haven't found in trying to look through the archives but maybe this is the best thread.  Has anyone ever transferred their beer to glass growlers after the carbonation period for the bottle conditioning period? 

 

Is aeration still an issue?

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Yes, aeration would be a huge issue.  Also, growlers are not designed to hold carbonation for extended periods.

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57 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Yes, aeration would be a huge issue.  Also, growlers are not designed to hold carbonation for extended periods.

Think I knew the answer to this when I posted!  :D  Thanks!

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