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Bottle Prime or Batch Prime

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 I am a relatively new brewer. Made a few batches before I discovered the Forums and have found a lot of useful advice but 1 thing I am not sure about is what is batch prime/ bottle prime? Is that when you put the carbonating sugar in prior/during bottling?

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Batch priming is when you transfer the wort to another container and add all the sugar. You buy a 2.5 gallon slimline or use another LBK or a bottling bucket.

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Batch priming is when you transfer the wort to another container and add all the sugar. You buy a 2.5 gallon slimline or use another LBK or a bottling bucket.

What is a bottling bucket?

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But a bottling bucket doesn't need a spigot. IMO, all it is , is a bucket to which you rack (transfer) your beer off the trub and from which you bottle (could be with a siphon, tube and bottling wand or if the bucket has a spigot then simply a tube and bottling wand. The value of a bottling bucket is that a) it reduces the likelihood that you will bottle any trub (because the trub has been essentially left behind when you racked) and since the beer in the bottling bucket is essentially trub-free then you can add the priming sugar directly to the beer in the bucket, gently mix and then bottle... (I use a two gallon food grade plastic bucket from LHBS to bottle my beers and wines  - no spigot to worry about or clean )

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Keep in mind that another LBK is only ten bucks which is around the price of a slimline.  You can also ferment in the additional LBK whereas you can not in a slimline.  My preference would be to get another LBK and use that since then if I was getting ants in my pants I could get a second brew cooking.  Obviously I have had the AIPS (ants in pants syndrome) as have 4 LBKs just for brewing.

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I have 4 LBKs and 1 conical (The name that shall not be named garbage), I have room for 8 LBK's.  My wife would kill me though if I had that much beer bottled at once every 3 weeks lol.

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Vakko, on 23 Feb 2015 - 1:45 PM, said:

I have 4 LBKs and 1 conical (The name that shall not be named garbage), I have room for 8 LBK's.  My wife would kill me though if I had that much beer bottled at once every 3 weeks lol.

I bet! That'd be like 165-166 12oz bottles (assuming 2 gallon in each LBK) even my practice of bottling half and kegging half would wear the capper out. :lol:

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I tried to buy a storage closet to put all of my conditioning beer in and I got shut down  :(  I was told that if I run out of room to store beer, then I need to slow down making until I free up spots.  Grrrrrrrrr

 

Life seemed so much easier before I had a wife...

 

If I would have know about brewing beer when I was still deploying for 12-15 months... man, the brews I would have!

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I tried to buy a storage closet to put all of my conditioning beer in and I got shut down  :(  I was told that if I run out of room to store beer, then I need to slow down making until I free up spots.  Grrrrrrrrr

 

Life seemed so much easier before I had a wife...

 

If I would have know about brewing beer when I was still deploying for 12-15 months... man, the brews I would have!

Yes, as much as we love them, we have to admit, sometimes wives just tend to get their priorites mixed up.
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So far I have not exceeded the limits of the man cave with conditioning ales. Though I will fess up and say, it gets awfully tight in here sometimes. :) Getting 4 ea 2.5 gal kegs helped.(They still phrase it like that when you sign for stuff in the army?) I can put them under my computer desk with room for 4 more (just eyeballing it) and still not be in my way.  Just one piece, of what I hope will be, helpful advice Vakko. Drink faster!  :lol:  I will send my address if I can assist in any way  :)

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Next week starts that grey time where I will be bottling big batch #2 but #1 still hasn't finished conditioning yet.

That means I will be brewing #3 without knowing if #1 is any good :(

So I will have 2 weeks to clear out #1 before #3 is ready to be bottled.  This could be a huge log jam if I can't get more space!  and bottles!!!!

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Have a party, 3-4 friends can help break up the jam.

I'm having a baby shower on the 22nd, but I don't think I'm invited :(

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LOL and congrats!

Thanks!

 

Looking at the custom beer labels now.  Looks like hours of work!

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I have 3 LBKs, 2 for use of fermentation and 1 I use for secondary, batch priming or what ever comes up (this is my old yeller LBK).

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I'm having a baby shower on the 22nd, but I don't think I'm invited :(

I think you've already done your part.

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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So what is the risks of transferring beer once fermented for three weeks from one LBK to another? You add the appropriate amount of sugar and then bottle? Is this something that should even be considered by a newby? Or is it really worth it in the long run? Adding two carb tablets to a 740ml bottle is pretty easy to do. Now, if it means I would be able to drink that last quarter inch of beer, maybe it is worth it!

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Ed,

 

Regardless of which priming method you use, you will still have Trub in the bottom of your bottles.  The only way to prevent that is to use force carbonation in a keg and then bottle the carbonated beer from the keg.

 

Vakko,

 

I feel your pain with the wife wondering what you are going to do with all of the beer.  My wife gifted me the 24LX and wonders why I have so many bottles and when I am going to stop brewing.  I have since bought the 8LX and now a 1 gallon carboy for test batches to decide what to brew in 5 gallon batches in the 24LX.

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So what is the risks of transferring beer once fermented for three weeks from one LBK to another? You add the appropriate amount of sugar and then bottle? Is this something that should even be considered by a newby? Or is it really worth it in the long run? Adding two carb tablets to a 740ml bottle is pretty easy to do. Now, if it means I would be able to drink that last quarter inch of beer, maybe it is worth it!

Batch prime means that every beer will have the exact same amount of carbonation (if you mixed well enough  :D  )

While carb drops appear uniform, everyone has seen the residue at the bottom of the bag.  Mr. Beer doesn't insert that for aesthetics.  As the bags move around the drops rub and subsequently lose some of it's mass.  This will cause inconsistency.

 

A field sniper will use competition ammo that is guaranteed to have so many grains of powder per round within a certain amount.

But a competition sniper might count each grain of power that goes into every round so he has the most consistent ammo available.

 

Since you're not going to count out each grain of table sugar that you put into each bottle that filled with a 1ml eye dropper, (at least I really hope not), you mix all the sugar at once so now each bottle, (no matter how much beer you put in there) will have the exact same carbonation ratio.

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BDawg62 makes a good point - you will always have trub in your bottles because the yeast turns the sugar into the carbonation and creates... trub.  

 

You add sugar to water, boil it, let it cool, then add that.  You can't just dump in sugar.

 

The advantages of batch priming include:

 

- uniform carbonation that adding sugar to each bottle, or carb drops, may not create, especially if you have different sized bottles (try splitting a carb drop to 3/4 size for a 12 oz bottle).  Another point - a carb drop is a teaspoon of sugar (assuming perfectly uniform carb drops).  Look at the chart - for 3/4 liter you add 2 drops or 2 teaspoons.  For 1/2 liter you use 1 drop or 1 teaspoons.  For 1 liter you use 2.5...  Same inaccuracy exists if you look at 20 oz (1.5 drops but 1.25 teaspoons) and 22 oz (1.5 drops and 1.5 teaspoons).  Many consider Mr. Beer's levels too carbed, so you then have to cut all those down some.  And to properly carb, you not only carb by style, but you put less sugar in if the temp is lower during fermentation than you do if the temp is higher during fermentation.  With batch priming, you figure out the level of carbonation you want, and all bottles get that level.  

 

- less trub in the bottles, although still some as explained above.

 

- easy ability to add extract flavors to the entire batch.

 

And Vakko posted similar while I was typing.

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Ed, I batch primed from batch #1.  If you use a siphon (auto siphon works great, costs about $10), lay the hose in the bottom of the container you are transferring into so it doesn't fall/drain from a height and get aerated.  I did it for the simple fact that I didn't want to forget a bottle.  Yes, there are methods to help avoid that, but batch priming is a no-brainer.  Add a little water to pot.  Boil water.  Add premeasured sugar determined by a priming calculator.  Dissolve.  Kill heat.  Pour into priming container/bottling bucket.  Add beer.  Bottle.

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I have 3 LBKs, 2 for use of fermentation and 1 I use for secondary, batch priming or what ever comes up (this is my old yeller LBK).

 

You can have an LBK sitting empty??  I borrowed one from a co-worker so I can have 4 to brew in!

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Remember to let the mixture COOL before adding to your priming container.  I insert the pot into a bigger pot with ice and water.

 

The easiest way to transfer (which is what I do) is to buy a length of food-grade hose (available at Lowe's or your LHBS) of about 4 - 6 feet in length.  OD is 7/16, ID is 5/16. $.39 a foot.  Sanitize the entire hose, including the inside (put in a bucket with sanitizer, and ensure it flows through the hose.  Hook the hose onto the LBK spigot, and put the other end in the 2nd LBK or slimline or bottling bucket.   When done, run warm water through the hose right away, then clean it with your other items.  

 

You can also use this method to connect your bottling wand to your LBK with any length piece of hose of these dimensions.

 

I tried a siphon, and found this easier and I don't have to clean a siphon.  

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Remember to let the mixture COOL before adding to your priming container.  I insert the pot into a bigger pot with ice and water.

 

 

True.  A few ounces of water cools fairly quickly.

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BDawg62 makes a good point - you will always have trub in your bottles because the yeast turns the sugar into the carbonation and creates... trub.  

 

You add sugar to water, boil it, let it cool, then add that.  You can't just dump in sugar.

 

The advantages of batch priming include:

 

- uniform carbonation that adding sugar to each bottle, or carb drops, may not create, especially if you have different sized bottles (try splitting a carb drop to 3/4 size for a 12 oz bottle).  Another point - a carb drop is a teaspoon of sugar (assuming perfectly uniform carb drops).  Look at the chart - for 3/4 liter you add 2 drops or 2 teaspoons.  For 1/2 liter you use 1 drop or 1 teaspoons.  For 1 liter you use 2.5...  Same inaccuracy exists if you look at 20 oz (1.5 drops but 1.25 teaspoons) and 22 oz (1.5 drops and 1.5 teaspoons).  Many consider Mr. Beer's levels too carbed, so you then have to cut all those down some.  And to properly carb, you not only carb by style, but you put less sugar in if the temp is lower during fermentation than you do if the temp is higher during fermentation.  With batch priming, you figure out the level of carbonation you want, and all bottles get that level.  

 

- less trub in the bottles, although still some as explained above.

 

- easy ability to add extract flavors to the entire batch.

 

And Vakko posted similar while I was typing.

So, if my math is correct, I would use 22 teaspoons of sugar to carb 11 740ml bottles. Boil that with a small amount of water, cool it, put it in th LBK and add beer, bottle for a month, then enjoy.

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So, if my math is correct, I would use 22 teaspoons of sugar to carb 11 740ml bottles. Boil that with a small amount of water, cool it, put it in th LBK and add beer, bottle for a month, then enjoy.

I assume you mean an extra LBK.  Because you do not want to add it the sugar to your primary fermentation LBK.

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So what is the risks of transferring beer once fermented for three weeks from one LBK to another? You add the appropriate amount of sugar and then bottle? Is this something that should even be considered by a newby? Or is it really worth it in the long run? Adding two carb tablets to a 740ml bottle is pretty easy to do. Now, if it means I would be able to drink that last quarter inch of beer, maybe it is worth it!

Ed, I feel you here. I've made 77 batches over 3 years and have yet to batch prime. For that reason, I can't honestly say if it's better or worse. It just comes down to me being lazy and set in my ways. I'd have to break out a 2nd LBK, sanitize it, heat the water, dissolve the sugar, rack the beer, then bottle, then wash two LBK's instead of one. I'm so lazy and bottle priming is easy enough I never felt the need to change. It all depends on what works for each person. I figure it's all good.

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I assume you mean an extra LBK.  Because you do not want to add it the sugar to your primary fermentation LBK.

Yes! I have 4 and only three are in use. I should have been more clear.

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So, if my math is correct, I would use 22 teaspoons of sugar to carb 11 740ml bottles. Boil that with a small amount of water, cool it, put it in th LBK and add beer, bottle for a month, then enjoy.

 

I'd strongly suggest you consider using the calculator at www.screwybrewer.com, because the per bottle measurements are figured out to easy to measure amounts, not the exact amount (maybe an extra 1/4 teaspoon x 11 bottles...).  For 2.13 gallons of beer, at 70 degrees (highest temp hit during fermentation) and 2.5 as the desired CO2 volume, Screwy's calculator has you use 12.3 teaspoons of cane sugar which the calculator says is 51.3 grams.  I can tell you that the most I ever put in an LBK batch was 65 grams, which would be 15.6 teaspoons.  22 is too much in my opinion.

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I bought the slimline just for batch primes on my flavor extract batches.  Otherwise, I will bottle prime.

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I also prefer a slimline over an LBK.  Why?

 

- It's clear and easier to see the exact amount in there.

 

- It's easier to sanitize and to clean.  When I'm done bottling, I fill it part way with water, put the lid on and shake it (no leaking like shaking an LBK), dump it out and do it again.  Then repeat with a drop or two of dish soap, rinse repeatedly.  It's also easy to lift it and tilt it with one hand to get the last drops out while holding a bottle with the other.  

 

- It doubles to hold 2.5 gallons of refrigerated water for brewing if you don't need it to bottle in the meantime.

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I'd strongly suggest you consider using the calculator at www.screwybrewer.com, because the per bottle measurements are figured out to easy to measure amounts, not the exact amount (an extra 1/4 teaspoon x 11 bottles...).  For 2.13 gallons of beer, at 70 degree (highest temp hit during fermenation) and 2.5 as the desired CO2 volume, Screwy's calculator has you use 12.3 teaspoons of cane sugar which the calculator says is 51.3 grams.  I can tell you that the most I ever put in an LBK batch was 65 grams, which would be 15.6 teaspoons.  22 is too much in my opinion.

I think 22 is the number of drops in the carb bag and I have yet to use all of them.

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Joe! I have a tendency to agree with you. I'm trying to figure out how to get my wife involved in the cleaning and sanitizing aspect of brewing.

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Joe! I have a tendency to agree with you. I'm trying to figure out how to get my wife involved in the cleaning and sanitizing aspect of brewing.

My wife's involvement:

"How long until these bottles are off of my kitchen counter?"

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Vakko, once my wife realized I would be giving the kitchen a good scrubbing every week. She decided to it was better to not look a gift horse in the mouth. Even helps with bottling (she likes to use the super agata)

 

post-59190-0-94697000-1424805512_thumb.p

 

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Vakko, once my wife realized I would be giving the kitchen a good scrubbing every week. She decided to it was better to not look a gift horse in the mouth. Even helps with bottling (she likes to use the super agata)

 

attachicon.gifSuper-Agata-Bench-Capper-3.png

That's the same one I have. :)

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My wife's involvement:

"How long until these bottles are off of my kitchen counter?"

I suppose, "When they are dry" is not a good response?

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I suppose, "When they are dry" is not a good response?

And that's basically my response.  I get the eye roll but I can take it.  lol

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Joe! I have a tendency to agree with you. I'm trying to figure out how to get my wife involved in the cleaning and sanitizing aspect of brewing.

Good luck with that, Ed. My wife won't touch anything related to beer, wine or whiskey. Doesn't help that she's a life-long Mormon. She is pretty tolerant about my lifestyle, in spite of that. She hates the smell of hops and grains cooking. Like others have said, she is happy that I clean up the kitchen so well before and after brewing. Other than the fact that the floor is ALWAYS sticky no matter how hard I try not to spill any. I tell her being married to me can only help her get into heaven by paying for her sins now.

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Also a newbie a few days from bottling my first batch. If I wanted to Batch prime instead of Bottle prime how many drops or how much sugar should I use?

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Also a newbie a few days from bottling my first batch. If I wanted to Batch prime instead of Bottle prime how many drops or how much sugar should I use?

Personally, I would say around 18.  But there are calculators out there like screwybrewer

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To get 2.5 vols I tend to use 5oz in a 5 gal batch & 2.5 oz in a 2.5 gallon batch. I'd try 2oz in 2 gallons

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To get 2.5 vols I tend to use 5oz in a 5 gal batch & 2.5 oz in a 2.5 gallon batch. I'd try 2oz in 2 gallons

Yeah, the rule of thumb is usually an oz per gallon.

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Also a newbie a few days from bottling my first batch. If I wanted to Batch prime instead of Bottle prime how many drops or how much sugar should I use?

Really? Did you not see this exact discussion earlier today in this post?

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RickBeer, Sorry I saw this post of yours

 

 

BDawg62 makes a good point - you will always have trub in your bottles because the yeast turns the sugar into the carbonation and creates... trub.  

 

You add sugar to water, boil it, let it cool, then add that.  You can't just dump in sugar.

 

The advantages of batch priming include:

 

- uniform carbonation that adding sugar to each bottle, or carb drops, may not create, especially if you have different sized bottles (try splitting a carb drop to 3/4 size for a 12 oz bottle).  Another point - a carb drop is a teaspoon of sugar (assuming perfectly uniform carb drops).  Look at the chart - for 3/4 liter you add 2 drops or 2 teaspoons.  For 1/2 liter you use 1 drop or 1 teaspoons.  For 1 liter you use 2.5...  Same inaccuracy exists if you look at 20 oz (1.5 drops but 1.25 teaspoons) and 22 oz (1.5 drops and 1.5 teaspoons).  Many consider Mr. Beer's levels too carbed, so you then have to cut all those down some.  And to properly carb, you not only carb by style, but you put less sugar in if the temp is lower during fermentation than you do if the temp is higher during fermentation.  With batch priming, you figure out the level of carbonation you want, and all bottles get that level.  

 

- less trub in the bottles, although still some as explained above.

 

- easy ability to add extract flavors to the entire batch.

 

And Vakko posted similar while I was typing.

 

But I missed this one, which still isn't a straight forward answer, but I'll take a look at the screwybrewer page and see if I can figure it out. Unfortunately being this is my first batch and didn't start reading the forum until about 10 days into fermenting I did keep track of any temps. And I'm not sure what desired CO2 volume to use.

 

I'd strongly suggest you consider using the calculator at www.screwybrewer.com, because the per bottle measurements are figured out to easy to measure amounts, not the exact amount (maybe an extra 1/4 teaspoon x 11 bottles...).  For 2.13 gallons of beer, at 70 degrees (highest temp hit during fermentation) and 2.5 as the desired CO2 volume, Screwy's calculator has you use 12.3 teaspoons of cane sugar which the calculator says is 51.3 grams.  I can tell you that the most I ever put in an LBK batch was 65 grams, which would be 15.6 teaspoons.  22 is too much in my opinion.

 

I'll read more carefully next time.

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You should not batch prime your first batch.

Agreed.

 

I would limit the steps that could effect the flavor of your beer.  Like: hydrometer readings, dry hopping, wort tasting, etc.

There's too many ways to mess up your beer that you want the first one to go as smooth as possible. imo

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Like we say on other threads "Brew it straight the first time." This would include priming. Keep it simple until you've gotten use to the procedures.

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Nick, I found a similar one.  It is a little tall for shorties, but it does long necks just fine.  Even so, I use the wood blocks with everything.  I'm going to try it with my mead when I get ready to bottle and cork it.

 

20150225_1815091_zpsolwyrnqf.jpg

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I have 4 LBKs and 1 conical (The name that shall not be named garbage), I have room for 8 LBK's.  My wife would kill me though if I had that much beer bottled at once every 3 weeks lol.

same here brother....  lol

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Is it ok to use the carbonation drops to batch prime? And how many for blackberry weizenbock?

 

By the question you asked, you don't understand what batch priming is.  

 

Batch priming is designed to equally distribute sugar to all the liquid and therefore equally carbonate all bottles.  How long does it take for carb drops to dissolve?  Answer - days.  Therefore, how would that work in batch priming?

 

 

Using 11 750ml bottles

 

 

The number of bottles is irrelevant in batch priming.

 

 

I recommend you bottle prime and spend more time reading.   ;)  

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Is it ok to use the carbonation drops to batch prime? And how many for blackberry weizenbock?

No, use corn sugar (you can get packets at your LHBS) or just use table sugar as it's cheap and works the same. Basically, boil a pre-determined amount of sugar in 2/3 cup of water or so for 5-10 minutes. Let that cool a bit and then pour it into your bottling vessel (a bucket & spigot system works fine or a 2nd LBK) and then pour your wort in on top of that. You can google it to find out more about the process but it makes bottling that much easier once you get the hang of it.

 

How much sugar to use? Click here and follow the directions on the calculator. It will tell you how much sugar to use for various sized batches and will also give you an idea of what carb levels are common for different styles of beer. You can modify the sugar levels to carb the beer more towards your taste if desired.

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. Basically, boil a pre-determined amount of sugar in 2/3 cup of water or so for 5-10 minutes.

 

What is the benefit of boiling the sugar for 10 minutes? I would think that simply heating the water long enough to dissolve the sugar and "inverting" to enable the yeast to convert it with less effort is all that it really takes, no? I heat enough water in my microwave into which I have added the priming sugar. I don't think that I have ever had any problem with carbonation...  Are you concerned with infecting the beer with bacteria that may be on the sugar or in the water?

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What is the benefit of boiling the sugar for 10 minutes? I would think that simply heating the water long enough to dissolve the sugar and "inverting" to enable the yeast to convert it with less effort is all that it really takes, no? I heat enough water in my microwave into which I have added the priming sugar. I don't think that I have ever had any problem with carbonation...  Are you concerned with infecting the beer with bacteria that may be on the sugar or in the water?

He said 5-10 minutes...

 

So basically the point is work it until the sugar is dissolved.  24 tsp of sugar in 2/3 cup of water takes some work to get dissolved.

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What is the benefit of boiling the sugar for 10 minutes? I would think that simply heating the water long enough to dissolve the sugar and "inverting" to enable the yeast to convert it with less effort is all that it really takes, no?

10 minutes is probably excessive and I doubt that I've ever boiled my solution for that long. Basically, I want to get to the point of super-saturation before dumping it. It gives me the warm fuzzies knowing that it'll mix well but I am sure there are some who might simply dump the sugar, give it a mix, and let 'er rip. Just like everything else in brewing, it's whatever floats your boat.

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Nothing is worse in bottling when you've filled all but 2 bottles and see a pile of sugar at the bottom of your bottling bucket.

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Boiling the water kills anything, although sugar is inhospitable to bugs.

I add sugar to the water while heating it, stir, and it dissolves well before boiling. Once it boils a minute, I am done and then cool it.

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So If I were to do this in a future batch I would cold crash the wort and on bottling day, boil/dissolve the sugar and put it in 2nd lbk, add wort and then bottle? Also won't this mixture be watering down the beer?

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So If I were to do this in a future batch I would cold crash the wort and on bottling day, boil/dissolve the sugar and put it in 2nd lbk, add wort and then bottle? Also won't this mixture be watering down the beer?

Your not adding that much water. Only about a 1/2 cup with 2oz of sugar in it(for an LBK) and it'll turn to alcohol as it carbs up.

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And GENTLY pouring wort into 2nd LBK.  You don't a bunch of oxygen.

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I boil my water and sugar mixture prior to getting my Items set up for bottling, then cover with sanitized alum foil and let cool. By the time my bottles have been sanitized and I'm ready to bottle my batch mixture is cool and away I go. Its so much easier to batch prime than bottle prime(for me that is, others maybe not).

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Its so much easier to batch prime than bottle prime(for me that is, others maybe not).

 

Versus a case of 1/2 liter bottles and carb drops I would disagree.  But other than that, yes, batch prime easier if you have a bottling bucket/LBK.

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Batch Priming is not easier, in fact it is a lot more work. However, it's been my experience that you get a more consistent carb thru the batch, and it eliminates the trub bottle.

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Batch Priming is not easier, in fact it is a lot more work. However, it's been my experience that you get a more consistent carb thru the batch, and it eliminates the trub bottle.

I never make a trub bottle.  Never understood why people do.

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Brewing is so great.  You ask a question, and you get every possible answer.

 

Is batch priming easier?

 

Answers:

 

1) Yes

2) No

3) It Depends.

4) Thursday.

 

I have batch primed since my 9th batch.  I stopped bottle priming because although using the Mr. Beer sugar measurer did make it easier, it still was a pain for me.  While carb drops or Domino dots may make things easier - they cost more than sugar and don't easily allow you to do different levels of carbonation.  

 

I do batch priming and cold crashing because I get more beer out of the LBK (posted a pic in another post showing virtually no beer left in the LBK), less trub, and it's easy for me.  I use a hose (7/16" outside diameter, 5/16" inside) that fits right on the Mr. Beer spigot and lay it in my 2.5 gallon slimline I bought at Walmart.  Easy as pie to flow into the slimline, mixing with the sugar solution I poured in ahead of time.  I fill 8 bottles, cap them, gently stir, and fill 8 more.  When it's empty, since I brew 5 gallons I get the 2nd LBK and do it again.  The slimline is incredibly easy to bottle from and clean.

 

Like anything else in home brewing, you do what you're comfortable with.

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I have batch primed from batch 1.  (Granted, I am only on my 8th batch brewed, with 5 bottled...)  Slimline is nice and easy, like Rick says.  I use a small auto siphon because I bought it for my 1 gallon mead fermenters and it works perfectly.  Maybe I'll try draining directly from the LBK into the Slimline the next batch I bottle this weekend.

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Make sure you use a hose or a bottling wand so as not to aerate beer.

 

I bought, and used, an auto siphon once.  Sitting in a bag on the brewing shelf now.

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Since I have not batch primed yet, would it be feasible to add the priming sugar to a slimline then use the bottling wand to transfer from the fermentation LBK to a slimline, then bottle it? Plus, I do not have a slimline yet and thought I had read where you don't want the blue slimlines, but the clear ones?

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Just to clarify, you are adding the priming sugar SOLUTION to the slimline, not just dumping in sugar.

 

The slimline I have, is clear with a blueish tint.  You may have read about plastic colors in fermenting containers.  http://www.walmart.com/ip/Arrow-H2O-2.5-Gal-Slimline-Beverage-Dispenser-Blue/15915151

Yes on both accounts. The more I read the more I learn. Add the "priming solution" first, cooled to room temperature. And, that's the exact slimline I looked at earlier at Walmart, but they do not have them in stock. One more question! Once the transfer is complete, do you very gently stir the beer to mix the priming solution or will it mix enough from just the transfer?

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Gently stir halfway, when done, and after every 8-12 bottles.

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I use a bucket so I just lay my hose on the bottom following the wall. It stirs it's self as it fills and then I gently stir every 12 bottles.

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Ok! My beer is fermenting at 64 - 66 degrees F for just over a week. I have another two weeks to go. In preparation of priming and bottling, I went to the Screwy Brewer to determine the amount of cane sugar I would need for each beer. Here is what I came up with:

Leggy Blond Belgian 2.3 CO2 and use 9.8 tsp for two gal

Heavy McWee. 1.3 CO2 and use 2.85 tsp for two gal

Irish Stout 2.0 CO2 and use 7.71 tsp for two gal

Do these amounts look realistic. I suppose I want to make sure I am understanding the calculator. I understand these values will change if I've brewed 2.15 gal.

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Looks like you did it right, assuming you are bottling at 66°F.  If you cold crash, make sure to change the temp.

 

Also, if you have a scale (or balance), it may be easier to weigh out the desired number of ounces rather than trying to figure out 0.85 of a teaspoon.  I do it that weigh (pun intended).

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They don't look right to me.  Maybe if they were tablespoons you might be close.  

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They don't look right to me.  Maybe if they were tablespoons you might be close.  

 

Did you put the numbers in?

 

Priming%20sugar_zpsoy2gx23o.jpg

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They don't look right to me.  Maybe if they were tablespoons you might be close.  

 

I just went back to screwybrewer and verified it said teaspoons...

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2.85 tsp in 2gals off beer seems way wrong!

 

While MrB says to use 3/4tsp per 12 oz, if you used 1/2tsp per 12oz, you would fill 5 bottles.

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Jim Johnson, on 24 Feb 2015 - 5:57 PM, said:snapback.png

To get 2.5 vols I tend to use 5oz in a 5 gal batch & 2.5 oz in a 2.5 gallon batch. I'd try 2oz in 2 gallons

Yeah, the rule of thumb is usually an oz per gallon.

 

 

Sorry, don't know how to quote someone from a previous page, but this was a post by JoshR... When I go back to screwybrewer and recalculate using ounces instead of teaspoons, it come up to almost 1.5 ounces.. so, it's a little light compared to an oz per gallon, but it doesn't seem too far off...

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Generally I use the Mr B amount but in sugar cubes. I get good carbonation Sometimes a bit over much but usually OK. I tried putting less and I found I was under carbonated so I now am back to the MrB amount except for some like ESB that are really better low carbed.

I guess it also depends what you like.

 

5 lumps - 1 L

3 lumps - .75 L

2 lumps - .5 L

1/2 lump 12 oz.

 

1 lump = 0.4 to 0.5g = 1 tsp. (depending who you ask)

198 lumps(dots) to the 1 lb. box.

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Jim Johnson, on 24 Feb 2015 - 5:57 PM, said:snapback.png

Yeah, the rule of thumb is usually an oz per gallon.

 

 

Sorry, don't know how to quote someone from a previous page, but this was a post by JoshR... When I go back to screwybrewer and recalculate using ounces instead of teaspoons, it come up to almost 1.5 ounces.. so, it's a little light compared to an oz per gallon, but it doesn't seem too far off...

Hit quote on any post on any page...

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Looks like you did it right, assuming you are bottling at 66°F.  If you cold crash, make sure to change the temp.

 

Also, if you have a scale (or balance), it may be easier to weigh out the desired number of ounces rather than trying to figure out 0.85 of a teaspoon.  I do it that weigh (pun intended).

Cold crashing is irrelevant. You put in the WARMEST TEMP, not the coldest.

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I never go below 50 grams in 2.5 gallons, which would be 42.6 grams in 2.13 gallons.

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Cold crashing is irrelevant. You put in the WARMEST TEMP, not the coldest.

Thanks for the clarification. That explains why my Oktoberfest was a little under carbed. I cold crashed that one and used the temp it came out of the fridge at. Noted for future batches that I cold crash.

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I never go below 50 grams in 2.5 gallons, which would be 42.6 grams in 2.13 gallons.

 

You would go with 1.5 ounces (42.6 grams) for 2.13 gallons of Heavy McWee as well?

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Yes. But I have never brewed that style. My stouts are fine at 50, as is my porter. Too low and it will seem flat.

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