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mcasselman

The NW Pale and Dark Winter even have cider flavor

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Dark Winter after 6 weeks still has slight cider flavor and the NW Pale after 4 weeks really has the cider flavor. Had the issue with Pilsner (1st) and finally gave up on it after 8 weeks (had to give it away). To be fair fermented the Dark Winter (3rd) at 72F room temperature, but the NW Pale (4th) fermented at 65F room temp. Did the Diablo IPA (4th) with the NW Pale, and its only saving grace is the hops to make it somewhat drinkable. Starting to think the "cider flavor" is just part of the straight up HME method. Not bashing Mr Beer, but just have not "liked" anything I have made so far. Have made 14 other batches per the directions that are conditioning, and hopefully something will change.

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Winter Dark...

No cider flavor when I made it.

72 air temp clearly could have been an issue.

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But the NW Pale I did at 65F 3 weeks, then 4 weeks at 70F for bottle conditioning and it is quite cidery. Like I sad, hopefully one of the next 14 batches will not have any cider flavor. Time will tell.

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Both of those are Craft Series. ABV is higher, around 5.1%. One guideline says to take OG and condition the number of weeks it tells you looking at the last 2 digits. That would be 5 to 6 weeks. Try 6.

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Never had a cider taste with the WDA. Did you add any additional sugars or booster? Your temperature was a little high - 72 deg F room temperature means the fermenting beer was higher. I usually let my WDA sit 8 weeks before I pop one in the fridge. At 14 brews in, you should be making some great beers. Do you use a hydrometer? Do you have a stick on thermometer (not the one with the check mark, but with degrees)? Did you pitch the yeast at the correct temperature and aerate the wort? Are you allowing a full 3 weeks for the beer to complete fermentation? RickBeer has some links that might be worth a revisiting. 

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Another possibility is high pitching temps. Before pitching your yeast, be sure to cool the wort down to around 70 or below. Use refrigerated water to top up your LBK. Many people claim they haven't experienced this issue, but it absolutely is a factor in acetaldehyde production (the stuff that makes the cidery flavor).
 

 

Starting to think the "cider flavor" is just part of the straight up HME method.

The cider flavor is not typical of our products when pitching/fermenting/carbonating at the proper temps and times. 

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Another possibility is high pitching temps. Before pitching your yeast, be sure to cool the wort down to around 70 or below. Use refrigerated water to top up your LBK. Some people claim they haven't experienced this issue, but it absolutely is a factor in acetaldehyde production (the stuff that makes the cidery flavor).

 

 

The cider flavor is not typical of our products when pitching/fermenting/carbonating at the proper temps and times. 

High pitching temps can produce a lot of unwanted flavors.  It's much safer to pitch at temps that can 5-10F or even lower below your target fermentation temp just to avoid these off-flavors/esters.

 

If you don't have a wort chiller, I would consider an putting your LBK into the freezer for a few before you pitch your yeast.

 

I have a chest freezer/fermenter that I use for my lagers and I put my ales in there for a few hours before I pitch.

 

However, if you use refrigerated water to fill/top-off your LBK, your pitch temp should be OK.  I always forget to put my water into the fridge before brew day  :lol:

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Doing everything by the book. I have tasted the basic wheat, basic pilsner, dark winter, nw pale, diablo, and dopplebock. All but the first 2 pretty taste the same to me. Maybe "caramel" is a better description. I love and have loved Hoppy beers for a long time and mainly drink them. Maybe it is just me.

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Pitching instructions for Fermentis lager yeast. They do say pitch above fermentation temp if pitching directly. They also say to mix it in if applied dry.

Hmm.

 

 

 

Saflager W-34/70 allows to brew beers with a good balance of floral and fruity aromas and gives clean flavors and high drinkable beers.

fermentation

Saflager S-23 Bottom fermenting yeast originating from the VLB - Berlin in Germany recommended for the production of fruity and estery lagers. Its lower attenuation profile gives beers with a good length on the palate.

 

 

Fermentation temp ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)

 

 

rehydration instructions

Sprinkle the yeast in minimum 10 times its weight of sterile water or wort at 23°C± 3°C (73°F ± 6°F). Leave to rest 15 to 30 minutes.

Gently stir for 30 minutes, and pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel.

Alternatively, pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20°C (68°F). Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes, then mix the wort using aeration or by wort addition.

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I have 11 more Mr Beer batches conditioning.  I will give the one's I have already listed more time.  As for pitching temperature, I refrigerate my water and follow the instructions.  The last 6 or so read around 64F when I pitched.  What is to cold to pitch Mr Beer yeast? 

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Speaking of pitching temperatures, from Fermentis for US-05 "Alternatively, pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20°C (68°F).  Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps.  Leave for 30 minutes, then mix the wort using aeration or by wort addition."  Beer making can be confusing?????
 

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Never had a cider taste with the WDA. Did you add any additional sugars or booster? Your temperature was a little high - 72 deg F room temperature means the fermenting beer was higher. I usually let my WDA sit 8 weeks before I pop one in the fridge. At 14 brews in, you should be making some great beers. Do you use a hydrometer? Do you have a stick on thermometer (not the one with the check mark, but with degrees)? Did you pitch the yeast at the correct temperature and aerate the wort? Are you allowing a full 3 weeks for the beer to complete fermentation? RickBeer has some links that might be worth a revisiting.  Might just be my taste buds.

No additional sugars or booster.  yes to all the rest. as for pitching temp, used refrigerated water as recommended.

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Pitching instructions for Fermentis lager yeast. They do say pitch above fermentation temp if pitching directly. They also say to mix it in if applied dry.

Hmm.

 

 

 

Saflager W-34/70 allows to brew beers with a good balance of floral and fruity aromas and gives clean flavors and high drinkable beers.

fermentation

Saflager S-23 Bottom fermenting yeast originating from the VLB - Berlin in Germany recommended for the production of fruity and estery lagers. Its lower attenuation profile gives beers with a good length on the palate.

 

 

Fermentation temp ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)

 

 

rehydration instructions

Sprinkle the yeast in minimum 10 times its weight of sterile water or wort at 23°C± 3°C (73°F ± 6°F). Leave to rest 15 to 30 minutes.

Gently stir for 30 minutes, and pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel.

Alternatively, pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20°C (68°F). Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes, then mix the wort using aeration or by wort addition.

IF you pitch about fermentation temperature, you run the risk of creating diacetyl and would require a DR.  That's why I cool my wort to fermentation temp before pitching.  It usually takes a few hours.

 

If you aerate your wort just before pitching, you don't need to mix it in.  You can pour your yeast right on top of the foam and it will work out fine.

 

I haven't found a reason to rehydrate dry yeast yet.  If you're fermenting for 3 weeks, what's a few hours to wait for high krausen to start?

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