Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
mcasselman

Danstar Nottingham Yeast

Recommended Posts

1st time using this yeast, and read their data sheet. I normally pitch yeast dry into cool wort, and most data sheets for other yeast say it is fine, but this one says not to. Has anyone else pitched this yeast dry with good results?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know where you're reading this.  While it tells you how to rehydrate, it doesn't say you must rehydrate.  The difference between their instructions (same for Windsor) and something like S-05 is that they don't list rehydrating and pitching instructions.  You're drawing an incorrect conclusion that this means you must rehydrate.

 

I use both and do not rehydrate and it works fine.   I did rehydrate for a few batches and so no difference, so I stopped.

 

FYI - Nottingham gets very active.  If you do 2.5 gallons in an LBK, it will overflow quite a bit.  Don't ask me how I know that.   ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They mention not to use wort for rehydration because it will cause a loss. Just assumed pitching straight to wort was the same thing. Must be plenty lest to do the job though. I have noticed you loosen lid a quarter turn for these "active" scenerios. I will probably do the same. I will let it overflow, clean LBK caps, sanitize, and put them back on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used Nottingham for cider and beer and don't typically rehydrate. Never had any problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the lbk's on large baking sheets with 1" tall sides.  In your experience will this hold the spill?  I plan on loosening lids 1/4 turn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you put 2.5 gallons in them, you will lose around 12 oz per LBK. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep in mind that those yeast packets were made with 5-6 gallon batches in mind. Any "loss" that happens won't be noticed in a 2 gallon batch.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to clarify - "loss" was referred to in two ways in this post.  Loss of yeast cells, which as Josh points out is irrelevant if you pitch the entire packet for 2 or 2.5 gallons, and loss of wort due to overflow.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too have stopped re hydrating as I have never noticed much of a difference (and Im lazy).  Ive always seen that as a good spot to pick up an infection. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the chamay recipe i'm doin calls for the T-58 dry ale yeast, ive read on other forums of people doin the similar clone claiming the yeast puts out too much spicey/peppery taste and the used Wyyeast  liquid yeast, cant exactly remember what type. just wondering if anyone has come across this as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If brewed at lower temps (65), the T-58 yeast will be spicy and peppery, if brewed at higher temps (75), it tends to be more fruity and less spicy. You can also find a nice balance by brewing it in between (around 70).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know where you're reading this.  While it tells you how to rehydrate, it doesn't say you must rehydrate.  The difference between their instructions (same for Windsor) and something like S-05 is that they don't list rehydrating and pitching instructions.  You're drawing an incorrect conclusion that this means you must rehydrate.

 

I use both and do not rehydrate and it works fine.   I did rehydrate for a few batches and so no difference, so I stopped.

 

FYI - Nottingham gets very active.  If you do 2.5 gallons in an LBK, it will overflow quite a bit.  Don't ask me how I know that.   ;)

 

Hmm... made a blonde tonight (extract w/steeped specialty grains) and I am using Notty. I rehydrated half a packet & pitched it into 2.4 gallons of 1.058 wort. The wort was 60° F when I pitched, and I have three ice-bottles in my cooler. I hope I am safe!

 

 *crosses fingers*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm... made a blonde tonight (extract w/steeped specialty grains) and I am using Notty. I rehydrated half a packet & pitched it into 2.4 gallons of 1.058 wort. The wort was 60° F when I pitched, and I have three ice-bottles in my cooler. I hope I am safe!

 

 *crosses fingers*

The nottingham can handle high lager temps. ~54F. So your should be ok especially since you rehydrated. At the most it will take off in a slower time frame.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Nut Brown Ale seasonal used that yeast, but I don't think it overflowed on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The nottingham can handle high lager temps. ~54F. So you should be ok especially since you rehydrated. At the most it will take off in a slower time frame.

 

Yeah, that's what is killing me - it's just sitting there. But then again, my last brew I cooled the wort down to pitch-temps and it took about 24 hours to really kick off as well, and I was using a full packet of US-05 there.

 

If it doesn't start doing something by late Monday night, then I will start to worry. As it is, I will just be annoyed with this beast of a yeast being a gadabout for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll take a look at the temp later, but I can tell you, I was pouring the wort (& 2 additional quarts of water) from at least 1 to 1-1/2 feet above the opening of the LBK, creating lots of foam just from the pour. I then pitched the rehydrated yeast on top of that, half on one side & half in the other, as best I could.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took a quick temp reading: ambient air - 59° F; wort temp - 60° F

 

Again, I will wait it out and hope it's just at a slow start. I refuse to start freaking out until Monday night/Tuesday morning.

 

It's just... ughhh...

 

  <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temp was the yeast at when you pitched it? It should be fine, that strain is a boss. Plus it comes with nutrients in packaging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rehydrated yeast was room temp by the time I got to pitch it, so say 70° F into wort that was 60-62 or so. That's as close as I could get the two at the time.

 

*EDIT* Beer is still ugghhh... no action, wort is placid in the LBK. I didn't change out ice packs this morning, the temp is 62/62 in there right now (ambient/wort).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the LBK in a cooler, I'd have to lift it out to look.

 

Give me 5 minutes or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The verdict - hard to say. Is there stuff on the bottom of the LBK? Yes. I made this brew from all DME, with the hops going in commando, so there was some protein & hops that made it into the LBK (I figure let the yeast figure out what it wants to chew on) so I don't really know if that's what you want to hear. I do know that currently, the ambient air temp & the wort temp are exactly the same. That tells me something, anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well My S-04 has taken off now.

Initially it did not look like much, but made LOTS of heat after 2 hrs, so I cooled it to low 60s. then it sat a bit and cooled down - now it is making foam and is only 1 deg above ambient. (62) (Pitched Friday midday.). So I guess it is doing fine.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take out the frozen bottles and place a hot water bottle in there until it hits above 65F and stir the yeast a little and give it about 12 more hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, took one more look at the LBK before I just got here, and HALLELUJAH, there is a thin layer of bubbles covering the surface of the wort! I imagine it will really get going overnight.

 

It did get up to 63° F , something I will remember when I use the other half of that pack of yeast to make a stout. I will probably let the wort cool to 64 and pitch room-temp hydrated yeast (I also might try washing this batch's yeast - why not, got to try it to do it, right?) for this upcoming beer.

 

This was almost a 48-hour lag, which surprises me considering all the steps I went through to make sure this yeast starts ASAP on the wort - hydrated the yeast according to directions, got the yeast & the wort less than 10 degrees of one another before pitching, added some old yeast with 10 minutes left in the boil to give the Notty some nutrients, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, after the slow start, I had nicely active fermentation, and then in a 24-span, everything dropped away. That was a week ago. I am thinking this thing is done, and was wondering - how much "clean-up" time do we really need? The faster I can get this bottled & carbed the better, as a blonde is supposed to be drunk young (if that sounds dirty to you, for shame - and I'm right there with you). I am thinking about taking a gravity reading, and if at FG (which I am almost sure it will be) cold-crashing it tonight & bottling it Tuesday - only 3 days early!

 

Sorry, this isn't a MrB recipe, but it does pertain to the yeast in the title...

 

  :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, just checked my Centennial Blonde - FG reading of 1.010 corrected, est. was 1.012. It hasn't done anything for a week but sit there (cleaning up) so I stuck it in the fridge to cold-crash for three days. I will bottle her on Tuesday. Final ABV is 6.3% (a little high for a blonde), est. SRM was 4, but it's extract mostly, so it came out a little darker, not sure how to measure it though. IBUs are supposed to be 16.

 

I tasted it, and it tasted pretty good, like flat beer. Can't wait to see how it crisps up with some clearing and some carbonation!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...