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I  just got done tasting the 2013 Winter Seasonal, the Belgian Spiced Ale. That was a really delicious beer and i already ordered another one. I wanted to add a LME to the next batch but not sure which one would go best with this one. Anyone thinking about brewing this should jump on it ASAP if they like a good tast spiced ale, kind of like a Sam Adams Cold Snap. Thanks for any advice

 

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There's really no bad combination.  It really comes down to your taste and/or if you're trying to reach a certain style range.

 

I used the robust LME.

 

If you're strictly looking for body and abv and not flavor change, I would go with the pale.

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Add the LME at the same time as your malt can. Keep in mind, by adding LME, you will tone down the hops and the spice a little bit. This may be a good thing depending on how much spice you like. I personally prefer mine to be subtle and not too overwhelming, so I'd add an LME to the batch, too. Plus you get that extra 1% abv and extra body, too.

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The Seasonal refills have a lot of malt in them - in this case 3.75 lbs (regular refills have 1.87 pounds, Craft Series have 2.86 pounds.)  Adding LME to this refill would be a lot of malt for 2.13 gallons, and would lower the IBUs and somewhat weaken the spices.  I'd recommend against it, but Pale would have the least impact to flavor.

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There's really no bad combination.  It really comes down to your taste and/or if you're trying to reach a certain style range.

 

I used the robust LME.

 

If you're strictly looking for body and abv and not flavor change, I would go with the pale.

And if you want better head retention, use the Golden LME. It will also add a bit of malty spiciness (it's our wheat LME).

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The Seasonal refills have a lot of malt in them - in this case 3.75 lbs (regular refills have 1.87 pounds, Craft Series have 2.86 pounds.  Adding LME to this refill would be a lot of malt for 2.13 gallons, and would lower the IBUs and somewhat weaken the spices.  I'd recommend against it, but Pale would have the least impact to flavor.

Yeah, because of the high volume of malt, I recommend fermenting at around 64-67. Stay at the low end of the temperature scale to prevent any potential messes from high krausen.

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Yeah, because of the high volume of malt, I recommend fermenting at around 64-67. Stay at the low end of the temperature scale to prevent any potential messes from high krausen.

My chimay was 70F and it was everywhere within 6 hours!

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The biggest downside to having to keep the temps low because of the malt volume is that the T-58 yeast really performs better in the mid 70s. That's when it really contributes to the spiciness of the beer. But if you have the 8Lx fermenter, this wouldn't be an issue because of the krausen kollar and larger interior volume.

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Sound like good advice and learning something new today, I found a mini Wine fridge at Lowes the other day for $99. I will have to make some room for it to brew properly this  summer.

 

The more HME/LME the greater the High Klausen. Reducing temp reduces aggressive yeast activity. hmmmm

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Reducing temps not only reduces aggressive yeast activity, but it also reduces off flavors from otherwise neutral yeasts such as our Mr. Beer yeast and the Safale 04 and 05 (among many others). Slow and low fermentations will also reduce loss of malt flavors. This can create a "hot" (alcoholic tasting) profile. But like I said, many other yeasts will benefit from higher temps. Here is a yeast strain database I put together for our Customer Service Reps. Feel free to share it if you wish. ;)

The yeasts in green are ones we carry.

Yeast Database

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Keep in mind that wine fridges are not designed to ferment beer.  While it may get warm enough (mid 60s),  remember that it is regulating the air temp in the wine fridge, not the wort temp.  If the wort temp starts to climb, the wine fridge won't kick in until the air temp it senses gets a certain point above its set point, and then it will run until it's a certain point below.

 

If you want to invest in a fridge/freezer/wine cooler, the best method is to build/buy a temperature controller where you attach the temp prob to the outside of the fermenter where liquid is, covered by a towel or bubble wrap to insulate it from the air temp, and then plug the fridge/freezer/wine cooler in after setting it on max cold.  This turns on the unit when the wort temp, not the air temp, gets too warm.  Most work in centigrade and usually are set with a 0.5 degree tolerance - for example mine is set to 17.8 C and therefore kicks on when I hit 18.3 C (64 and 65 F respectively).  I also have a heat source that kicks on when the temp hits 17.3 C (63 F), which is a lightbulb in a paint can.  

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Keep in mind that wine fridges are not designed to ferment beer.  While it may get warm enough (mid 60s),  remember that it is regulating the air temp in the wine fridge, not the wort temp.  If the wort temp starts to climb, the wine fridge won't kick in until the air temp it senses gets a certain point above its set point, and then it will run until it's a certain point below.

 

If you want to invest in a fridge/freezer/wine cooler, the best method is to build/buy a temperature controller where you attach the temp prob to the outside of the fermenter where liquid is, covered by a towel or bubble wrap to insulate it from the air temp, and then plug the fridge/freezer/wine cooler in after setting it on max cold.  This turns on the unit when the wort temp, not the air temp, gets too warm.  Most work in centigrade and usually are set with a 0.5 degree tolerance - for example mine is set to 17.8 C and therefore kicks on when I hit 18.3 C (64 and 65 F respectively).  I also have a heat source that kicks on when the temp hits 17.3 C (63 F), which is a lightbulb in a paint can.  

You can set up the temp probe from the wine fridge this way.

 

However, when you have a multiple LBK set up, attaching the the probe to one of them doesn't really make much sense.  I assume a 5 degree swing from the exothermic reaction of high krausen so I set my air temp at least 5 degrees lower than my maximum allowable for my yeast/recipe.

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Thanks for the heads up Rick,

 

I don't want to recommend anything that will throw people off track.

 

If I purchase one of these, I will install my own control system as well.

 

Vakko is correct, Multi probes on different batches will have to have uni-PID loop and get real fun to program. Lets stay on topic and not run people away for now. LOL :D

 

Cheers

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The biggest downside to having to keep the temps low because of the malt volume is that the T-58 yeast really performs better in the mid 70s. That's when it really contributes to the spiciness of the beer. But if you have the 8Lx fermenter, this wouldn't be an issue because of the krausen kollar and larger interior volume.

 Couldn't you also make your wort and then divide it between two LBK's to give more room for fermentation?

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 Couldn't you also make your wort and then divide it between two LBK's to give more room for fermentation?

I don't see why not. I would carefully rack them together once the primary fermentation phase has passed, though.

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 Couldn't you also make your wort and then divide it between two LBK's to give more room for fermentation?

then the old headspace thing comes into play but yes, you could do that.

 

I think most people want to make 4.26 gallons of beer with 2 LBK's not 2.13 gallons divided between 2 LBKs

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Reducing temps not only reduces aggressive yeast activity, but it also reduces off flavors from otherwise neutral yeasts such as our Mr. Beer yeast and the Safale 04 and 05 (among many others). Slow and low fermentations will also reduce loss of malt flavors. This can create a "hot" (alcoholic tasting) profile. But like I said, many other yeasts will benefit from higher temps. Here is a yeast strain database I put together for our Customer Service Reps. Feel free to share it if you wish. ;)

The yeasts in green are ones we carry.

Yeast Database

Thanks for sharing!

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Headspace, new term for excess  unused area above the LBK wort fill mark? Excess oxygen criteria?

 

I have read about splitting 5 gallon recipe to make 2 LBK happy. hmmm.

 

Gotta sleep, 21+ up now from shift.

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Thanks for the tips everyone Im thinking twice now about going with it because of the crazy fermentation it had without LME. If I do go with one it'll probably be the pale or golden. Plus I like the spice taste it had by itself.

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then the old headspace thing comes into play but yes, you could do that.

 

I think most people want to make 4.26 gallons of beer with 2 LBK's not 2.13 gallons divided between 2 LBKs

 Well to be honest I was really thinking of more like 3.5 gallons split in 2LBK's. There's this crazy scientist inside waiting to get out and he has all kinds of crazy ideas. Maybe I should just get myself ( I mean the crazy scientist ) a 8Lx to play with.

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I think you mean 24lx... the 8lx is still 2 gallons...

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