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pocketjr

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I made a mistake. I introduced my best friend to the Mr Beer system and got him hooked. That wasn't the mistake…. the mistake was that I gave him my brew pot because my wife bought me a 10 gallon pot for christmas last year and for some reason I thought I wouldn't need the little one I was using for my Mr Beer batches. Now I haven't made a Mr Beer sized batch since, and I can't find the same pot I gave away! 

 

This led me to wonder…. What equipment do you guys use on brew day? What size and brand is your MrB pot? Do you use anything others might not?

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pots: my wife kindly gave me free use of any of the 1 - 2.5 gallon stock pots... cheap stainless from china but they work.  I also bought a 10 gallon stainless stew pot with lid. it is a broad monster that is I think 16 inches across and about 12 inches high. to date I haven't done a batch that large but if I do a 5 gallon batch full volume boil... it will be nice.

 

the only unconventional equipment I think I use during brew day is a kitchen sieve.  I run the wort through it while transferring to the fermenter to aerate and sift out the hop crud when I don't use a spider to catch the crud during the boil.

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I got a 32 qt pot and a 20 qt pot dedicated brew equipment. Though I haven't brewed a HME in quite a while. If I need a smaller pot I'm not the least bit proud about grabbing something from our cookware

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I use an 8 qt pot from the kitchen set for all extract and most partial mash LBK batches. I have a 16 qt pot that also doubles for cooking which I use for LBK size BIAB batches and 5 gallon extract batches. Works like a charm.

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20qt pot that I use for everything.  Really nice because it won't foam over when I'm boiling LME in 4 cups of water :)

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Turkey fryer.  Cheap and comes with a burner!  One thing to look at is the surface area.  The wider the pot, the more boil off you will most likely have when doing full boils.  For MrB batches not a huge deal, but you will want to protect yourself for down the road so you dont end up buying the same piece of equipment multiple times.

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More surface area means it will boil faster, too.

Yes, but you want to be careful. We had to reformulate the Sugar on Top recipe to 6 cups of water from the normal 4 cups due to people doing the 30 minute boil for the hops/LME in pots that were too large. They ended up evaporating out all the water and charring their batch, ruining it.

There's no need to have a 20qt kettle for our kits. 8qts will suffice for all of our recipes. Now if you're using the 24Lx, you may want to consider something as big as a 20qt. I'm not trying to discourage you from using large kettles (OK, maybe I am), I'm simply conveying the most common problem associated with people brewing our 2 gallon batches in large kettles.

 

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I 100% do not need a 20qt pot for make any MrB recipe.  But I like having it for all of my modded recipes.  It gives me extra room for boil over.   :)

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I have an 8 gallon and a 15 gallon. But I do full boils. No worry of boil over with DME.

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Sometimes I borrow my friend Hoss's 50 gallon hat when I suspect a very vigorous boil over.

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Yes, but you want to be careful. We had to reformulate the Sugar on Top recipe to 6 cups of water from the normal 4 cups due to people doing the 30 minute boil for the hops/LME in pots that were too large. They ended up evaporating out all the water and charring their batch, ruining it.

There's no need to have a 20qt kettle for our kits. 8qts will suffice for all of our recipes. Now if you're using the 24Lx, you may want to consider something as big as a 20qt. I'm not trying to discourage you from using large kettles (OK, maybe I am), I'm simply conveying the most common problem associated with people brewing our 2 gallon batches in large kettles.

 

Yeah, for doing most MrB recipes you should be able to get away with something you have in your kitchen now.  What I was getting at is a lot of people think "I want to do 60 minute 2.5 gallon recipes" so get a pot just big enough for that, then down the road "I want to do 5/7/10 gallon recipes" and start buying more kettles, "full volume boil" comes into play so grab a few more while flush with money, and finally the all grain bug hits and SWMBO is putting his stuff out to the curb along with 17 kettles of various sizes.  But no, when boiling 4-6 cups of water you certainly would not want to do it in a 10 gallon pot by any means.  That is, unless it is really tall and really really skinny.

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The bigger the pot, the harder it is to pour into your LBK...

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I got a 6 qt stainless pot at Walmart. It has a pouring lip on it that works great. Sometimes it's not big enough though if I'm adding a lot of stuff. Wish I could find about a 2 gallon pot just like it.

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I was looking at buying a 8 gallon stainless pot as i plan to evenually move up to 5 gallon grain batches. Was wondering what peoples thaughts were on temperture probe and ball valve inlets as well as bazooka screens and false bottoms. Are they worth paying the extra money to get or are they just frivilous extras?

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If I were you and had it to do over again; I would get a 40qt instead of the 32qt. 5 gal full volume boils are pushing it's limits.

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I made a mistake. I introduced my best friend to the Mr Beer system and got him hooked. That wasn't the mistake…. the mistake was that I gave him my brew pot because my wife bought me a 10 gallon pot for christmas last year and for some reason I thought I wouldn't need the little one I was using for my Mr Beer batches. Now I haven't made a Mr Beer sized batch since, and I can't find the same pot I gave away! 

 

This led me to wonder…. What equipment do you guys use on brew day? What size and brand is your MrB pot? Do you use anything others might not?

I discovered this cool pot called a maslin pan that works great for brewing Mr. Beer batches.  What I really like about it are the two handles and the pour spout.  It even has a measuring scale on the inside.  It is expensive when you compare it to a $7.00 stock pot from Walmart, but it doubles as a cook pot for soups and stews to go with your beer.  Due to its heavy construction it should last me a lifetime.  I got mine from Chefs http://www.chefscatalog.com/product/29174-chefs-maslin-pan-with-lid-10-quart.aspx

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I use an enamel coated kettle that usually that I use in my smoker for baked beans for my wort and dme boils,

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I thought a 5 gallon pot would be plenty big enough for any 2.5 gallon batch. Then my last one ended up being almost exactly 5 gallons pre-boil. I scooped some out, put it in a smaller pot, then boiled both down until I could add the wort from the smaller pot to the larger pot without making a huge mess. Not the most elegant solution, but it worked. 

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I thought a 5 gallon pot would be plenty big enough for any 2.5 gallon batch. Then my last one ended up being almost exactly 5 gallons pre-boil. I scooped some out, put it in a smaller pot, then boiled both down until I could add the wort from the smaller pot to the larger pot without making a huge mess. Not the most elegant solution, but it worked. 

 

That's how to roll with the punches.  

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I was looking at buying a 8 gallon stainless pot as i plan to evenually move up to 5 gallon grain batches. Was wondering what peoples thaughts were on temperture probe and ball valve inlets as well as bazooka screens and false bottoms. Are they worth paying the extra money to get or are they just frivilous extras?

Remember, doing a full boil batch you will be boiling anywhere from 6-6.5 gallons of wort due to losses.  So 8 gallons can be "just barely enough."

 

For a boil pot I would not worry about a temperature probe UNLESS you are planning on using it as a mash tun down the road.  You could always cap off one of the welds if needed to protect for down the road.  I would probably spend the money on a fitting for a ball valve as can help alot with transfer.  Take this from the person manhandling the 5-7 gallons of wort while pouring into the fermenter.  Yup, would love a ball valve.  Dagnabit, have a weldless one sitting in the brew closet now that I think about it....

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My wife wanted to go to Kitchen Stuff Plus this weekend. I ended up picking up a 6.2 litre stock pot, which I think my wife was more impressed with than I was. Something about it's a Henckel and only 60 bucks? I have no idea. I was just happy that I got a good stainless steel pot for my MB batches again.

The downside… I spent the money I was going to use for an order today. DOH!

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My wife wanted to go to Kitchen Stuff Plus this weekend. I ended up picking up a 6.2 litre stock pot, which I think my wife was more impressed with than I was. Something about it's a Henckel and only 60 bucks? I have no idea. I was just happy that I got a good stainless steel pot for my MB batches again.

The downside… I spent the money I was going to use for an order today. DOH!

DOH!  :(

 

I would recommend checking out the flea market next time.  Not only do they have a bunch or watches, sunglasses, and knives, but they also have tons of cookware.  Most of it is aluminum so you have to be super careful with it.  But it won't rust and you can get mega sizes for dirt cheap.

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I have an old 6-quart stainless steel pot with two handles.  I find the two-hand pot is way easier to pour than the one-hand pots.

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DOH!  :(

 

I would recommend checking out the flea market next time.  Not only do they have a bunch or watches, sunglasses, and knives, but they also have tons of cookware.  Most of it is aluminum so you have to be super careful with it.  But it won't rust and you can get mega sizes for dirt cheap.

About the only downfall of aluminum is that it will oxidize so you can't use oxygen based cleaners to clean it.  No biggie in my book as bringing to a boil will naturally sanitize it anyway.

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My wife wanted to go to Kitchen Stuff Plus this weekend. I ended up picking up a 6.2 litre stock pot, which I think my wife was more impressed with than I was. Something about it's a Henckel and only 60 bucks? I have no idea. I was just happy that I got a good stainless steel pot for my MB batches again.

The downside… I spent the money I was going to use for an order today. DOH!

FYI:

http://www.homebrewing.org/8-Qt-Stainless-Steel-Pot_p_3218.html

 

$12.99 should someone else be looking for a 2'ish gallon pot.

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Remember, doing a full boil batch you will be boiling anywhere from 6-6.5 gallons of wort due to losses. So 8 gallons can be "just barely enough."

For a boil pot I would not worry about a temperature probe UNLESS you are planning on using it as a mash tun down the road. You could always cap off one of the welds if needed to protect for down the road. I would probably spend the money on a fitting for a ball valve as can help alot with transfer. Take this from the person manhandling the 5-7 gallons of wort while pouring into the fermenter. Yup, would love a ball valve. Dagnabit, have a weldless one sitting in the brew closet now that I think about it....

Agree 100%. Bought an 8 gallon pot for 5 gallon batches, and I had a boil over every other batch. Upgraded to 15 gallons after suffering for a year. Now I use the 8 gallon for a hot liquor tank. I did get ball valves and thermometers for both pots. It was worth it in my opinion, I love not having to stick a thermometer in to check on the cooled wort temp.
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About the only downfall of aluminum is that it will oxidize so you can't use oxygen based cleaners to clean it.  No biggie in my book as bringing to a boil will naturally sanitize it anyway.

all you have to do is season it after cleaning, by putting a couple inches of water in the pot and boil for an hour

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Was thinking of add some sort of quick connector on the valve with a hose on the other half of the quick connector. I saw a brew pot with a quick connector but dont know where. Has anyone tried or seen these quick connectors? Look kind of like a air hose coupler.

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About the only downfall of aluminum is that it will oxidize so you can't use oxygen based cleaners to clean it.  No biggie in my book as bringing to a boil will naturally sanitize it anyway.

Another negative of aluminum is that it acts as a heat sink and doesn't hold heat as well as stainless steel. This normally wouldn't be an issue for an all extract brewer, but when doing grain steeps and partial mashes, this can be a problem when trying to maintain a set temperature for an extended period of time.

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I got a roll of this stuff: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Reflectix-16-in-x-25-ft-Double-Reflective-Insulation-with-Staple-Tab-ST16025/100012574?N=5yc1vZbedf Made a form fitting blanket and top cover for my pot, then I wrap it 3 throws, I only loose 2 degrees Fahrenheit over an hour mash. I use my 32 qt pot to mash in, don't have me no fancy mash tun

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I have an old toilet bowl that sit in the back yard thot maybe since its ceramic, I cud use it to boil wort? eventho, I scrub it intensely, I still have the old brown water line, does anyone support what i'm attempting or even tried this? really dnt want to flush down this idea just yet?

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I have an old toilet bowl that sit in the back yard thot maybe since its ceramic, I cud use it to boil wort? eventho, I scrub it intensely, I still have the old brown water line, does anyone support what i'm attempting or even tried this? really dnt want to flush down this idea just yet?

Besides your proposed grossness factor, i assume UR JKin.  Ceramic is one of the best material insulators you can find.  Which is why they put ceramic tiles on the bottom of the space shuttle.  You will not be ale to get it to a boil unless you also have a crucible.  If you have a crucible then you could make some crazy brews at volcanic temperatures.

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FWIW NYC Chinatown/ lowereast side as some crazy restaurant supply houses.  The one I went in last week had about 20 stainless steel mesh spiders of various sizes that had a loop to hang off the pot.  Actual pots and metal containers of every size imaginable.  Plus there's one shop that will custom build you any type of pot you can think of.  Sooo next time yur in NYC take yur traveling companions of a real taste of NY

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I have an old toilet bowl that sit in the back yard thot maybe since its ceramic, I cud use it to boil wort? eventho, I scrub it intensely, I still have the old brown water line, does anyone support what i'm attempting or even tried this? really dnt want to flush down this idea just yet?

man! this guy noes what he's talking about! maybe I should try this !

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I have an old toilet bowl that sit in the back yard thot maybe since its ceramic, I cud use it to boil wort? eventho, I scrub it intensely, I still have the old brown water line, does anyone support what i'm attempting or even tried this? really dnt want to flush down this idea just yet?

I've been known to bring a toilet boil to a boil now and then. :P

 

 

 

 

MAN!  This thread is headed down-hill fast!

 

:lol: :lol: :lol:

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just ordered a five gallon recipe of a dble hop ipa that included a free 6 gallon carboy, cudnt pass it up, see what comes frm that

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I use an eight quart stainless steel stockpot, this is for my two gallon LBK though. I have been thinking ahead of my own skill and have been pricing out 32-40 quart stainless steel stockpots for roughly $30+/- and change. I imagine this would be the way to go......That is going to take forever to heat up on my electric stove top though  ^_^

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I use an eight quart stainless steel stockpot, this is for my two gallon LBK though. I have been thinking ahead of my own skill and have been pricing out 32-40 quart stainless steel stockpots for roughly $30+/- and change. I imagine this would be the way to go......That is going to take forever to heat up on my electric stove top though  ^_^

get something like this;  http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=bayou+classic+banjo+burner&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=56936633917&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5852883134835098825&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&ref=pd_sl_2ew1ihma45_b

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Great idea! I have a smaller one of these for camping. Negative side to this is that it would have to be done out in the apartment parking lot during the winter until I buy a house with a garage...Lol

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Using a tight fitting lid will accelerate your boiling times up to 50%

If you don't get a lid, Gordon Ramsay says you to use thick aluminum foil.

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Lately what I've been doing is leaving the lid on until it starts boiling, then sliding it back halfway. Supposedly there are sulfur thingies that need to boil off, and leaving the lid half on allows them to escape instead of condensing on the inside of the lid and falling back in your wort.

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Lately what I've been doing is leaving the lid on until it starts boiling, then sliding it back halfway. Supposedly there are sulfur thingies that need to boil off, and leaving the lid half on allows them to edcape instead of condensing on the inside of the lid and falling back in your wort.

And the lid creates a good chance for boil over.

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Lately what I've been doing is leaving the lid on until it starts boiling, then sliding it back halfway. Supposedly there are sulfur thingies that need to boil off, and leaving the lid half on allows them to edcape instead of condensing on the inside of the lid and falling back in your wort.

This is correct. Leaving the lid on all the way will prevent the escape of dimethyl sulfide, which will give the beer a cooked vegetable off-flavor. In other words, it will make the beer taste cabbage-like. I only use a lid until I reach my boil, then I take it off completely.

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This is correct. Leaving the lid on all the way will prevent the escape of dimethyl sulfide, which will give the beer a cooked vegetable off-flavor. In other words, it will make the beer taste cabbage-like. I only use a lid until I reach my boil, then I take it off completely.

 

That's what I used to do until I switched to a 5 gallon pot with higher wort volumes. My kitchen stove was having trouble keeping a 4 gallon boil where I wanted it, and leaving it on half way helped a lot.

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Great idea! I have a smaller one of these for camping. Negative side to this is that it would have to be done out in the apartment parking lot during the winter until I buy a house with a garage...Lol

I ain't got a garage, I cook on my front porch.  right now I'm cooking on my stove, as I need a new regulator for my bayou classic

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I ain't got a garage, I cook on my front porch.  right now I'm cooking on my stove, as I need a new regulator for my bayou classic

I cook on my stove and my tells me everytime "please don't make a mess."

 

You let a partial mash kit boil over ONE time and she hounds you about it for years...

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I cook on my stove and my tells me everytime "please don't make a mess."

 

You let a partial mash kit boil over ONE time and she hounds you about it for years...

 

I cook on sat. she works half a day, then goes shopping with her mom. So by the time she gets home there is no mess. I use to brew on Thursdays, but the MiL lived here then and would narc on me if I made a mess...

 

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I cook on my stove and my tells me everytime "please don't make a mess."

 

You let a partial mash kit boil over ONE time and she hounds you about it for years...

 

I'm the neat and tidy cook around here, even with the occasional boil over. My gf makes jelly a lot, and it looks like a produce truck exploded all over our stove when she's done.

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I'm the neat and tidy cook around here, even with the occasional boil over. My gf makes jelly a lot, and it looks like a produce truck exploded all over our stove when she's done.

always clean up and she always asks me if I'm going to...  :angry:

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always clean up and she always asks me if I'm going to...  :angry:

That's just being a female.

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always clean up and she always asks me if I'm going to...  :angry:

Tell her no, but do it anyway.

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Tell her no, but do it anyway.

LOLOLOL

 

I DO!

 

I pretty much say, "nope, this will be the 1 time I don't clean it."

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