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Golden One - Collaboration Recipe NOW AVAILABLE!!

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Belgium isn’t just known for their waffles; they are also known for the quality and diversity of their beers. The sheer number of Belgian beer styles is astounding, but one of our all-time favorites is the Belgian Blonde Ale.

Golden One from Anthem Brewing has a fruity nose and hints of coriander and pineapple that bring balance to this beer's malty base. The Saaz hops compliment the spiciness exhibited by the T-58 yeast and the addition of coriander, while the cane sugar imparts a dryness most Belgian styles are known for. The gentle mix of fruity esters (pineapple, lemon, orange, grapefruit, pear), sometimes light phenolic spiciness (pepper, clove) and smooth, slightly warming alcohols builds a complex, but easy-drinking beer.

http://www.mrbeer.com/golden-one-blonde-ale-collaboration-recipe

Recipe-GoldenOneBelgian-Home.jpg

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I just ordered a 4 pack of 23oz weissbier glasses and 4 of the 16oz belgian glasses.  Which should I use for this beer?   :blink:

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I ordered one.

Will there be any taste difference using booster rather than cane sugar? Will it get a better foam on it?

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no, not using enough to effect the taste of the brew. use the booster at the start with the HME to help with head retention.

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Sounds good. I have spare booster packs from when they were shipped with booster.

There is a lot of stuff in this one. I think I will do it in 8LX.

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Stick with the sugar, otherwise you're taking it out of style and it's no longer a Belgian blonde. Sugar is what gives Belgian ales their dryness. Most of them use Belgian "Candi" sugar (made from beet sugar), but cane sugar is a suitable substitution.

There is no need for booster in this recipe. It has a nice head from the Golden LME, which is our wheat LME. Wheat gives better head retention than booster, or even carapils. This recipe is fantastic as is, and needs no added adjuncts, nor should any adjuncts be substituted.

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Stick with the sugar, otherwise you're taking it out of style and it's no longer a Belgian blonde. Sugar is what gives Belgian ales their dryness. Most of them use Belgian "Candi" sugar (made from beet sugar), but cane sugar is a suitable substitution.

There is no need for booster in this recipe. It has a nice head from the Golden LME, which is our wheat LME. Wheat gives better head retention than booster, or even carapils. This recipe is fantastic as is, and needs no added adjuncts, nor should any adjuncts be substituted.

This weekend's run of batches all used about half a bag of booster.  Do you think I would have better results using 1 Golden LME instead?

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This weekend's run of batches all used about half a bag of booster.  Do you think I would have better results using 1 Golden LME instead?

Yes. Not only does it give better head retention, but it will also give more body and flavor than booster. The only downside is your beer may be a little more hazy than usual due to the high protein content of wheat malts. It's never really bothered me, though, and if you use Irish moss or Whirlfloc, this can be avoided.

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I'm trying to get more retention on some of my fancy IPA/L's so I went with a little booster to keep them clear and it doesn't affect the flavor.  A nice foamy top with a huge nose really makes an IPA memorable.  It's that pound of grapefruit that makes me want to spit it out lol.  Damn you Beer Camp: Hoppy Lager.

 

btw... if you google "camp lager," Auschwitz comes up  :huh:

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I'm trying to get more retention on some of my fancy IPA/L's so I went with a little booster to keep them clear and it doesn't affect the flavor.  A nice foamy top with a huge nose really makes an IPA memorable.  It's that pound of grapefruit that makes me want to spit it out lol.  Damn you Beer Camp: Hoppy Lager.

 

Many IPAs are the only thing that I would use Booster for, as a lot of time you will want them dried out to make them more hop forward.

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Mainly I use booster when I do not want that extra maltiness. I like some CAL and Aztek with just the booster and a bit extra hops.

 

I am surprised that the cane sugar provides a different taste than the booster, I though sugar was sugar.

 

More reading.

 

http://www.cascadiabrew.com/understanding_brewing_sugars.asp

 

 

These folks are also Cooper's importers and have a list of recipes that likely could also be made with Mr B components

http://www.cascadiabrew.com/recipe_database.asp

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Booster is good for not adding affecting the taste much.

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Besides possible cost saving, I wonder my the majority of "big beer" use adjuncts.

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06/01/2015 sampled a dregs testing bottle - still quite sweet, warming. When the beer is warmed up, very fruity and aromatic.

I am thinking to make this again and maybe  use a different hop with lots of tropical fruit overtones.

Suggestions? Mosaic?  Galaxy?

 

**************************
 5/14/2015   Bottled it today, . It is quite warming, with some sweetness and nice hints of pineapple.
 
*************************
4/23/2015 I started the Golden One today. That will be the strongest beer I ever made. Bottles in pic are what I took out of LBK - Sam Adam clone try #3. 
 
 
Tasted better than last, fairly clean, more hoppy than last time. can taste malt too. Will see after a few weeks.

golden blonde20150423 150144

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OK, I can add that. The smell coming out of the LBK now is awesome, sweet and aromatic. Foam has subsided a bit after 1 day.

 

So that would be about 1/2 cup maltodextrin??

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This one is pretty active I have the LBK at 5 deg F above ambient. It DOES smell nice though, already.

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This tasted sweet but warming and very friendly on bottling, since it was warming, I figured it was done after  3 weeks.  But....

Bottle carbonation was extremely quick, starting after 3 hours  noticeable firming up, getting quite firm after 24 hours so I was worried about bottle bombs again, and that it may not have been fermented out. So I have vented the bottle 2x. Just a quick pfft and closed again before bubbles come out of the bottle.    Today when I did that, the aroma released was amazingly full of pineapple <WOW>

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I tried one after a month in the bottle. Tastes pretty authentic. Obviously needs longer, but I wanted to see. It is REALLY strong and warming.

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Well we liked the Golden One, it was a hit at my daughter's tasting with her buddies, but considering ingredients to hand (and ways to use up CAL and Patriot Lagers from my old but newly acquired $9.99 AMerican Refill packs), I am thinking of making an American Blonde - rather than the Golden (Canadian) Blonde.  

So the modified recipe would be this but the process unchanged.

CAL HME

American Lager HME,

1/2 cup sugar,

8 oz Wheat Malt,

0.25 oz Huell Melon,

0.25 oz Mandarina Bavaria,

(I have these and thought a mix might be good and that 0.5 oz of each would be too strong - so this way I get a bit of pepperiness and dryness from the Huell, and a bit of orange from the Bavaria - and if I like it I have enough to do it again :-))

T-58 fermented warm

 

Any thoughts?

Of course the next after this might be a German or Mexican Blonde (Pilsner or Aztek + CAL)

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So I did make it but I used Galaxy hops instead (0.5 oz).

Tasting a carbonated test sample after 4-5 days, it was rather nice. Sweetish, honey colored, heavy body (not quite syrupy), warming and light aroma of tropical fruits.

It will be interesting to see how the flavors develop over time

 

This style is a great way to use up CAL and out of date Patriot Lager or other lighter beer HME cans.

 

After all, I labeled this brew "Golden Two".

 

This not too bad for $9.99 plus cost or yeast, hops and Wheat DME.

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Hey guys. I'm trying to open the link for this recipe and I'm getting the "oops" error. Is there an updated link? I'd really like to try it.

Thanks!

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No link, but here it is:

 

Golden One from Anthem Brewing

 

 

RECIPE INCLUDES:
1 Can Classic American Light
1 Can Canadian Blonde
2 Dry Yeasts (under lids of HMEs)
1 Brewmax LME Softpack – Golden
1 Packet Safbrew T-58 Yeast
1 ½ oz Packet Saaz Hops
1 Muslin Hop Sack
2 Packets No-Rinse Cleanser

YOU PROVIDE:
1 teaspoon Coriander Seed, freshly crushed
½ cup Cane Sugar

 

STEP 1: SANITIZING

Follow the steps outlined in your MR.BEER® BEER KIT INSTRUCTIONS. (You can find a copy of these instructions to download by clicking on the "Help" tab at the top of the website.)

NOTE: BE SURE TO SANITIZE EVERYTHING THAT WILL COME INTO CONTACT WITH YOUR BEER.

STEP 2: BREWING

Brewing beer is the process of combining a starch source (in this case malt extract) with yeast. Once combined, the yeast eats the sugars in the malt, producing alcohol and carbon dioxide (CO2). This process is called fermentation.

  1. Remove the yeast packets (not needed for this recipe) from under the lids of the cans of hopped malt extract (HME), then place the unopened cans in hot tap water. a
  2. Place the pellet hops into the hop sack tying it closed, then trim away excess material.
  3. Using the sanitized measuring cup, pour 4 cups of water and the 1/2 cup sugar into your clean 3-quart or larger pot. Bring water to a boil stirring constantly, add in the hop sackb and crushed coriander, and then remove from heat.
  4. Open the cans of HMEc and the pouch of LME, pour the contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called wort.
  5. Fill keg with cold tap water to the 4-quart mark on the back.d
  6. Pour the wort into the keg, and then bring the volume of the keg to the 8.5-quart mark by adding more cold water. Stir vigorously with the spoon or whisk. e
  7. Sprinkle ONLY the Safbrew T-58 yeast into keg, then screw on lid. Do not stir.
  8. Put your keg in a location with a consistent temperature between 59°and 75° F, ideally about 67° F and out of direct sunlight.f Ferment for 7-14 days.
  9. After approximately 24 hours, you will be able to see the fermentation process happening by shining a flashlight into the keg. You'll see the yeast in action in the wort. The liquid will be opaque and milky, you will see bubbles rising in the liquid, and there will be bubbles on the surface.

Your fermentation will usually reach its peak in 2 to 5 days (this is also known as “high krausen”). You may see a layer of foam on top of the wort, and sediment will accumulate at the bottom of the fermenter. This is totally normal. Complete fermentation will take approximately 2 weeks.

After high krausen the foam and activity will subside and your batch will appear to be dormant. Your beer is still fermenting. The yeast is still at work slowly finishing the fermentation process.


Step 3: BOTTLING AND CARBONATING

Follow the steps outlined in your MR.BEER® BEER KIT INSTRUCTIONS. (You can find a copy of these instructions to download by clicking on the "Help" tab at the top of the website.)

Footnotes

 

  1. Hot water will help the syrup-like malt inside the can pour more easily.
  2. The hops will remain part of the wort during the fermentation.
  3. The can is more easily opened from the bottom.
  4. Between 35° and 40°F. Tap water, bottled spring water or charcoal-filtered tap water all work great. Most sources of water (even hard water) work just fine, but be sure not to use highly chlorinated water or water with high levels of iron in it. These can produce off-flavors.
  5. Stirring will introduce oxygen to the wort that gives the yeast what it will need to begin fermenting.
  6. It is extremely important that you maintain a steady temperature between 59° and 75°F. Too cold-the yeast will go dormant. Too warm-the yeast will produce off-flavors.
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I still think it's super cool that the mr beer / coopers ppl get on this forum and actually reply to posts with valuable and helpful info.

 

well done guys...   :)

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Thanks MRB Tim.

Just to clarify, I'm new to this forum, not to beer brewing. Not an expert, just a guy who loves his beer.

I'm limited to five 8 liter brewing kegs and usually brew 4 times a year. So, I've brewed less than 2000 liters.

I am so glad I found this forum. I am eager to learn and improve!

I do have some favorite recipes, but would love to try some new ones. I haven't really browsed the site yet. Is there a recipe section? I'm getting ready to brew again and would invite new recipes! Point me in the right direction or email me your favorites!

CHEERS!

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Welcome to the community, Autospa! We do have over 100 recipes on the site with many more planned. I can also help you find a particular recipe if you're going for a certain style or brand. Don't hesitate to ask questions as everyone here is knowledgeable and friendly. And feel free to give me a call directly if you have any issues or questions about our products. Cheers!

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You can also find other recipes here on the message board, under "Basic Recipes" and "Advanced Recipes"...

 

 :)

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That is awesome. I literally just ordered a variety of brews. I'll have all 5 kegs going soon.

Thanks for the help.

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Thanks to Tim for helping me on the phone during my ordering process. He made it a bit easier to find the ingredients ala carte!

I start brewing Goldenn One, Amberosia Tripel, That Voodoo That You Do, Honey Maibock and Beach Babe Blonde.

Any tips or extra ingredient ideas are welcome.

Oh, one question. How long would you recommend conditioning??

Thanks! Cheers!

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3 weeks fermenting, 4 weeks, or more, conditioning.  Ferment wort below 70, condition bottles 70 or above.  Refrigerate for 3 days only what you're ready to drink.

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What Rick said - but it goes beyond that. The conditioning time really will depend on your beer, but 4 weeks is the minimum you should go. Maybe 3 if it's a super-hoppy IPA. But bigger beers (read: higher ABV) will take longet to condition, and darker beers benefit more from longer conditioning. If any additives were added (fruit, any extracts, coffee, etc.) then conditioning time changes, dependant on what was added.

 

IDK exactly what is in those recipes except for TVTYD, but that one and anything called a tripel are going to be big beers, and will take a while to condition and develop all the flavours fully. The tripel, I don't really know at all as I have no experience brewing one, but the Voodoo will need to condition probably a good 8 weeks before it's ready to sample young.

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Thank you two for your comments.

I have brewed a lot of tripels. Typically I condition them 3 - 6 months.

I have all these beers fermenting in my cool basement. Never gets above 70 in there. Currently it is 67.

Cheers.

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I see that Anthem Brewery has a Bourbon barrel aged version of Golden One that is 8.9%. How can that be emulated - Oak chips soaked in Bourbon? how to do this? and the % seems higher too, that cannot just be the barrels can it?

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Anyway I started another  batch of Golden One today (no oak chips) and saw that this CAL too had minor corrosion on inside seam at the same location as the other. That is 2 like that but they are the ones dated 2014 I got cheap on clearance from Total Wine I think . I also checked the Canada Blonde I used (dated 2016) and that was showing some discoloration on the seam inside too Maybe there is a canning production issue here? I don't think it is bad enough to hurt the beer but still worth looking out for in case. You can't see it until the malt is poured out though..

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Anyway my daughter enjoys the Golden One even more now she has a special glass to drink it out of.

Beer glass In Use

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slym2none, on 26 Aug 2015 - 02:29 AM, said:slym2none, on 26 Aug 2015 - 02:29 AM, said:

No less that they joke around with us... like we're real human beings.

 

  ^_^

 

I guess some of us pass the "Turing test"    - lol.

(Plugs in to recharge.)

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I think next I will make a "Golden Three" , & use up my Aztec HME, the other light one.

So maybe CAL HME, Aztec HME and Mosaic hop this time.

 

One was CAL, Canadian Blonde and Saaz  Hop

 

Two was CAL, Patriot/American Lager and Galaxy Hop

 

So -Three --> CAL, Aztek and Mosaic Hop

 

Anyone think this would not work?

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