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Lazarus0428

Dogfish head IPA

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Hi I am new to brewing I just started my second batch with the Rose's Rambling Red recipe. I am a fan of DFH 60 minute IPA and was looking to create a recipe similar. I have seen this video on YouTube and was wondering if changing up the hops to ones used in other large recipes would work would make a difference.

Mr. Beer - 60 Minute Pale Ale: https://youtu.be/HXHAp05Grcc

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That was a Sierra Nevada clone the guy in the video made, not a DFH 60. The title simply refers to the boil (almost all beers go through a 60 minute boil). The minutes in the DFH 60/90/120/etc IPAs not only refer to the boil, but also the hopping method. Instead of adding a specified amount of hops at intervals, DFH uses a system that continuously adds a small amount of hops every second of the boil.  

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That was a Sierra Nevada clone the guy in the video made, not a DFH 60. The title simply refers to the boil (almost all beers go through a 60 minute boil). The minutes in the DFH 60/90/120/etc IPAs not only refer to the boil, but also the hopping method. Instead of adding a specified amount of hops at intervals, DFH uses a system that continuously adds a small amount of hops every second of the boil.  

Why Josh?  Why would they add hops every second when a chart would suggest that you only need to hops at 60, 20, 7, and dry hop?   :D

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Why Josh?  Why would they add hops every second when a chart would suggest that you only need to hops at 60, 20, 7, and dry hop?   :D

I don't know, Vakko. I'm not their Brewmaster (though I wish I was...lol).

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I don't know, Vakko. I'm not their Brewmaster (though I wish I was...lol).

LOL I was hoping you would explain the advantages of varying the hop schedule instead of just doing the standards 4 spots.

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Why Josh?  Why would they add hops every second when a chart would suggest that you only need to hops at 60, 20, 7, and dry hop?   :D

 

Just a sales gimmick

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Pretty much.

So you think there's no advantage to varying your hop schedule outside the standard 4 hard times?

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So you think there's no advantage to varying your hop schedule outside the standard 4 hard times?

I didn't realize there were "standard times"...this is news to me.

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This thing that Jim has been peddling for years...

 

hop_utilization1.jpg

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There are no "standard" times for hop additions. The hop schedule is based on how much alpha acids are in the hops, how much IBUs you're going for, and other factors. Sometimes I will do a 60/40/20 schedule, sometimes I'll do a 60/30/15 schedule, sometimes I'll do a 60/50/40/30/20/10 schedule, etc. So there is no set hop schedule. It can vary depending on a variety of factors and personal preferences. Continuous hopping, however, is a gimmick IMO. It's not going to give you anything beneficial over a simple, well planned hopping schedule.

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I asked because I like the 60/x/y/z/a/b/c/DH14/DH7 and beyond but someone was asking about why anyone would do it and I thought maybe you had an "industry" answer for it  :lol:

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That chart is about getting the most out of the hops efficiency-wise, there by the most economical (I'm cheap).  If your willing to throw enough hops at it. You could probably get a good bitter in 15-20 min

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That chart is about getting the most out of the hops efficiency-wise, there by the most economical (I'm cheap).  If your willing to throw enough hops at it. You could probably get a good bitter in 15-20 min

Downside would be 3oz of hop flavor because you needed 50IBU lol

Upside is a much more pale beer because you haven't boiled the wort for 90 minutes.

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Maybe they have a continuous feed hop process that they can program to the needed profile and they just let it do its thing and keep adding. Does not sound too hard to devise.

Ha, a quick Internet search turned this up as 1st item.... :-D

 

And there is more in blogs/forums if you look.

 

www.dogfish.com/files/Zopinator.pdf

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Yes, sir!

 

But not the gun.  The chamber and firing mechanism.  So if you know the approx. weight of each whole hop, you set how many times the solenoid should "fire" to send a hop down the barrel into the boil.  Then you set the solenoid on a timer.

 

Or you have the solenoid on continuous "fire" but you set the cycle by time (in minutes) assuming and then you timer those cycles.

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Here you go, straight from the horse's mouth (5 gallon batch, scale accordingly):

 

Pre-boil tea at 150°F (66°C)
6 gallons (23 L) water
Grain bag
6 ounces (175 g) crushed amber malt
Boil
7 pounds (3.2 kg) light dry malt extract (75 minutes)
1/2 ounce (15 g) Warrior hops (Add gradually over 60 minutes)
1/2 ounce (15 g) Simcoe hops (Add gradually over 60 minutes)
1/2 ounces (15 g) Amarillo hops (Add gradually over 60 minutes)
1 teaspoon (5 g) Irish moss
1/2 ounces (15 g) Amarillo hops (End of boil)
Fermentation
Yeast: Wyeast 1187 Ringwood Ale or Safale S-04; or White Labs WLP 005
1 ounce (28 g) Amarillo hops (6 to 7 days)
1/2 ounce (15 g) Simcoe hops (6 to 7 days)
Bottling
5 ounces (140 g) priming sugar
STARTING GRAVITY: 1.064
FINAL GRAVITY: 1.017
FINAL TARGET ABV: 6%
IBUS: 60

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This would be cool for whole hops!!!

 

XP4600C-m3.jpg

You shoot Pokemon balls at stuff?

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I have been reading so many clone recipes for this beer and they are all for 5 gallons and full grain boils like the recipe posted already and I just do not feel ready for a full boil like that. So searched around and pieced together my own from a bunch of recipes and I came up with this it should be easier and hopefully the taste is close. But what is better exactly the same or close but my own concoction.

DFH 60 minute IPAish clone

3.3 lbs Pale LME

1.0 lbs Amber DME

.75oz warrior 60-35 mins (continuous)

.25oz Simcoe 35-25 mins (continuous)

.75oz Palisade 25-0 mins (continuous)

Dry hop with:

.50 amarillo

.50 simcoe

.50 glacier

Safale S-04 or S-05 Dry Ale Yeast

I would choose another yeast but this one seems the most stable to my environment which is between 70 and 73 degrees.

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Go with the US-05. But a saison yeast would be more suitable for your environment, considering the wort will get as much as 8-10f above the ambient temperature. Saison yeast is quite happy in the 80s

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I have been reading so many clone recipes for this beer and they are all for 5 gallons and full grain boils like the recipe posted already and I just do not feel ready for etc.

Actually the recipe I posted is from Sam Calagione's book. It's an extract recipe with a little steeping grains, not difficult at all. Just divide everything by 2 for a 2.5 gallon batch. For a 2 gallon batch multiply everything by .4. Don't change the yeast quantity though.

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Btw don't get scared off by the grains. All you do is put the grains in a fine mesh bag of some sort, heat your water to 150ish, put the grain bag in, and try to hold the temperature for 30 minutes. It doesn't have to be exact, just don't let the temp. exceed 170. After 30 minutes remove the bag. Your brewing water is now a "tea" that adds a little color and flavor. After that add your extract and hops according to the recipe. Super easy, and it adds another dimension to extract brewing.

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To me it's simpler.  Heat water to 165.  Turn flame off, insert grain bag, put lid on.  In 20 minutes it's ready, and there is no issue with holding temps.  You can go 30 if you want, still no issue.  Remove bag, you have steeped grains.  No need to keep flame going.  And I agree, it adds a lot (Carafoam or Carapils add body and head, other grains add color and flavor).  

 

Once at that step, it's easy to go to full extract recipes since any idiot (points in mirror) can steep grains, remove bag, pour in LME, heat to boiling, and follow directions to add hops at various times while it's boiling.

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Gerry, my wife said she would buy me an ale pale for my bday. The recipe you posted will most likely be the second recipe I brew in it. The first will be a barleywine so I can get it aging.

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C-ya, I think you have it wrong.  I heard your wife to say that she couldn't wait until you kicked the bucket (for the insurance), not that she would buy you a bucket...   :lol:

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To me it's simpler.  Heat water to 165.  Turn flame off, insert grain bag, put lid on.  In 20 minutes it's ready, and there is no issue with holding temps.  You can go 30 if you want, still no issue.  Remove bag, you have steeped grains.  No need to keep flame going.  And I agree, it adds a lot (Carafoam or Carapils add body and head, other grains add color and flavor).  

 

That's what I do

 

Once at that step, it's easy to go to full extract recipes since any idiot (points in mirror) can steep grains, remove bag, pour in LME, heat to boiling, and follow directions to add hops at various times while it's boiling.

 

That's what I did.

I guess there's another way to do that, but dipped if I know what it is.

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Oh I am not scared off. I just want to get a few under my belt. And then try more advanced stuff. I do want to expand from using Mr. Beer stuff because I have an awesome homebrew place near my house that Ibwant to utilize.

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Oh I am not scared off. I just want to get a few under my belt. And then try more advanced stuff. I do want to expand from using Mr. Beer stuff because I have an awesome homebrew place near my house that Ibwant to utilize.

 

Steeping grains might be considered "intermediate", but if you can put a tea bag in a cup of hot water you can do it. You're heating up water anyway, why not dunk some grains in it?

I think I used steeped grains in my 2nd or 3rd batch back in the 90s, and I can assure you, it ain't rocket science. But I totally understand, do what you're comfortable with and master the basic stuff. Myself, I started homebrewing in 1995 and until this year I only did extract/steeped grains. I was perfectly content with that. But I tell ya, I'm having a blast doing ag now, I should have done it sooner.

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Gerry, my wife said she would buy me an ale pale for my bday. The recipe you posted will most likely be the second recipe I brew in it. The first will be a barleywine so I can get it aging.

 

Cool, you doing 5 gallon batches? I'd like to try that one or a 90 Minute clone, or maybe Raison d'Etre. I miss my Dogfish Head. I almost drove to Florida on National Beer Day just to get some, but decided against it. Regrets.

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Oh I am not scared off. I just want to get a few under my belt. And then try more advanced stuff. I do want to expand from using Mr. Beer stuff because I have an awesome homebrew place near my house that Ibwant to utilize.

,Go slow, don't institute any changes till your comfortable with, what your going to do and how you have to do it. Keep copious notes, they could help you figure out where a batch went wrong.(and they do go wrong)

 

 

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Cool, you doing 5 gallon batches? I'd like to try that one or a 90 Minute clone, or maybe Raison d'Etre. I miss my Dogfish Head. I almost drove to Florida on National Beer Day just to get some, but decided against it. Regrets.

 

Yeah, I want to do a few.  Big things like barleywines and things I'll drink the heck out of (the Magic Hat clone), I'll do in a 5er.  Make it worth the time and energy to get more bottles of beer!  I could use two LBKs, but the ease of a bucket (one container) and the low cost are pushing me to it.

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Yeah, I want to do a few.  Big things like barleywines and things I'll drink the heck out of (the Magic Hat clone), I'll do in a 5er.  Make it worth the time and energy to get more bottles of beer!  I could use two LBKs, but the ease of a bucket (one container) and the low cost are pushing me to it.

 

Yeah I know what you mean. I've been enjoying the versatility of doing smaller batches, but there have already been a couple times I that wished I had another case of whatever I was about to finish off. Idk where the hell all the stout went, I think I have 6 left out of a case and I just bottled it about 3 weeks ago. I have 3 lbks, so I could do a 5 gal. batch. I'm just getting this all-grain thing dialed in so I'm going to stick with smaller batches for now. I'm really seeing some $ savings with all-grain. I think I've spent maybe 30 bucks on that barleywine I'm still working on, and that included 9.6 lbs of grain and $14 worth of liquid yeast. I think this latest Belgian pale ale was maybe $17. Where else are you gonna a case of 12% barleywine for $30?

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I am finding the more recipes I read and concoctions I think up the more addicting this hobby is getting I may need to buy a second keg so I  can have two different brews going at once because waiting to start the next brew seems very difficult. 

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Click on the image icon above in the toolbar (scroll over and it will say "Image". It looks like a mini polaroid picture). Then input the url of the image (https://etcetcetc). Then click OK. TADA!!!

Fishing+float.jpg

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I want to know how to post pics stored on my 'puter/Pad. It's kind of weird some pics it'll let me copy and paste (i.e. the red dancing banana) but other pics, like the bobbers, no. The paste option remains un-selectable.

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Yah the stored ones would mean you have to upload the picture onto MrB and they don't do that.  

 

Hey Vakko, if you click "More Reply Options"  you can attach pics to your post. It took a while before I learned that by accident.

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more reply options...ah there it is...

 

 

I will test it with a rare shot of the Milky Way from Mars.

 

 

post-59190-0-75810300-1429020976_thumb.j

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Hey Vakko, if you click "More Reply Options"  you can attach pics to your post. It took a while before I learned that by accident.

True.  But those are tiny format pictures.  I can link via html high def pictures that aren't in thumbnails:

 

artistic-beer-wallpaper.jpg

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True.  But those are tiny format pictures.  I can link via html high def pictures that aren't in thumbnails:

 

 

This is pretty hi-def, although it doesn require the extra step of clicking on it if you want it to get bigger. I'll happily take this if it means I don't have to screw around with Photobucket. Plus thumbnails don't take up a bunch of room on the screen. YMMV of course.

post-65227-0-53621800-1429039735_thumb.j

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Btw isn't that a beautiful African grey? He lives at the Uptown Car Wash with his buddies who are a cockatoo, a sun conure, and a chameleon.

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Btw isn't that a beautiful African grey? He lives at the Uptown Car Wash with his buddies who are a cockatoo, a sun conure, and a chameleon.

My parents have had their sun conure for 20+ years and he hates everyone but them.

 

And I use photobucket to store all kinds of pictures.  And it's way easier to pull a photo on my phone or on someone else's computer than carrying around a photo album.  Plus, they make it so easy to share the photos on the 20,989,875,230,989 social websites out there.

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Yeah, a lot of birds get attached to their owners and don't tolerate other people very well. I had a macaw like that. He barely tolerated me and wanted to kill everyone else, especially women. Apparently the previous owner lived with his mom, and she didn't care for birds.

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That's why I never got into birds. I'm a "if your friendly, I'm friendly" kind of guy...to anything with a backbone. Sadly, my daughter and son in law has a couple bird eaters. I hate spiders with a passion (just keep them in the cage, and they'll live thru this.) but for some reason birds esp. parrots get just plain evil to people they don't know.

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