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wang dangler

3 batches 3 fails. what am I doing wrong?

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I received a Mr beer kit for Christmas last year and have made 3 batches if beer. Each batch has been fairly flat and tastes like cider. I know my first batch did not carbonate long enough (1 week). The second batch had good carbonation after 2 weeks but still tastes like cider. My third batch fermented for 3 weeks and carbonated for an additional 3 weeks @ room temp. I tried one bottle Today and it us flat and tastes like cider. Can anyone help.

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Did you put sugar in the bottles? If yes, how much? What is "room temp"? Were the bottles rock hard? Are they Mr. Beer PET bottles? What bber did you make?

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For one thing, it sounds like you're not letting the bottles condition long enough. If I'm understanding correctly, your 3 batches conditioned in the bottle for 1 week, then 2 weeks, and then 3 weeks. They should all have gone 4 weeks each. Assuming you haven't opened all the bottles yet, give them more time and see what happens. And like Rick says, did you add priming sugar, and how much?

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Welcome to the forum.

 

3 weeks in the LBK and 4 weeks in the bottles @ room temp (68f +). Cider taste =  green beer. Assuming you used sugar/carb drops in the correct amounts per bottle. It's flat cause it ain't conditioned enough.

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Yes I did use sugar drops. with my first two batches used the plastic bottles and put a little more sugar than the directions said to. With the second batch I did get good head but still tasted like cider. With my third batch I have switched to glass 12oz bottles and used the exact amount of sugar according to the directions that came with the kit. This batch has carbonates for 3 weeks. I will give it another week at room temperasure then put some bottles in the fridge for a few days before I open another bottle.

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Patience, its one of the hardest lessons to learn with this hobby. I'll echo what the others are saying about bottle conditioning. You probably don't need to add excess sugar to your bottles beyond the recommended amount from MrB, unless you like over carbonated beer. I'm curious to know which refills/recipes you've had bad results with because, usually, the more fermentables you have in your wort (malt, booster, honey, etc.) the longer it takes to condition. I've had beers take 3 months or longer in the bottles before the flavor really started to become palatable for my taste. Also, conditioning temp is a factor. I've found room temp, @ 70°, works very well for my brews. You've come to the right place to ask questions. This forum has a wealth of knowledge & insights to help you make great beers. So don't give up, just be more patient & your creations will surprise you.

Cheers!

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Let's see, we have a Wang Dangler and Creamz here, there's Magic Matt on another forum...the homebrewing community is being invaded by male strippers!

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Hello, my first batch didn't carbonate either I used the plastic bottles with the twist caps that can with the LBK, I have upgraded to the glass 12oz bottles. I have a batch of the Northwest Pale Ale fermenting right now for 3 weeks at at a room temp. of 70,with the LBK in a cooler. When I do bottle (and this may sound like a dumb question) is it best to add the sugar first and then the beer or the beer first and then add the sugar. Last batch I used the drops but thought I would use sugar this time.

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I always add sugar to the bottles before filling em. That way the beer kinda mixes the sugar as it fills. Then after their capped, I gently upend each bottle before placing em in a box or plastic tub for 4 weeks of carbing & conditioning. Hope this helps.

Cheers!

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1side4, you need to get the wort (your fermenting beer) to a lower temp.  Room temp of 70°F during active fermentation can be close to 80°F.  This can impart undesirable characteristics to your beer.  I ferment at 62-64°F ambient temp, which keeps my wort at 68°F or lower.

 

If you are bottle priming, do like RickBeer does:  empty, clean, sanitized bottles on one side, add sugar, move to the other side.  When all bottles are dosed, check them.  Then add your beer and cap.  Once capped, gently - GENTLY - upend (turn over) and mix.  Place somewhere to condition and carb at 70 (sounds like you have that part covered!).

 

Good luck with it!  But get it cool!

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Time is your friend. Let them condition another month or so at room temperature. Some beers are ready with just 4 weeks conditioning, but in my experience this is the exception, and most are better after 8 weeks conditioning. I have on hand a couple which are 5 and 6 months old and they are great. I always try to save a couple of bottles and find that the "older" bottles are never disappointing. 

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Hello, my first batch didn't carbonate either I used the plastic bottles with the twist caps that can with the LBK, I have upgraded to the glass 12oz bottles. I have a batch of the Northwest Pale Ale fermenting right now for 3 weeks at at a room temp. of 70,with the LBK in a cooler. When I do bottle (and this may sound like a dumb question) is it best to add the sugar first and then the beer or the beer first and then add the sugar. Last batch I used the drops but thought I would use sugar this time.

Sugar first beer second...the other way gets messy. In the FWIW department, there is no real difference in priming sugars. Use table sugar it's the cheapest. Here is a link with tools to help you figure the vols (volumes) needed by style. Plus a couple of other calculators.

 

http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/p/brewing-tools-formulas.html

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The cider flavor (green apple flavor) is the side affect of an immature beer with the default yeast provided by MB.

 

It sounds to me that your yeast should be gobbling up the bottling sugar.  Is it something as simple as the caps not on tight enough?  Time for new bottle caps?  Bottle caps do need to be replaced every now and then.

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