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Cold crashing is putting your LBK in the refrigerator for about 3 days right before you bottle. It helps dramatically in clearing your beer.

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And remember to put a piece of wood (3/4" x1" x 6" under the spigot end of the LBK while you are fermenting and cold-crashing and even bottling (until you get the brew down to the spigot then use it at the other end)...this assists in keeping the trub in the bottom of the LBK away from the spigot and makes for a cleaner pour when you are bottling. The cold-crashing helps compact the trub and actually makes for an easier and cleaner bottling experience. One might ask if this affects the yeasties take longer to help in carbonation but I would answer that question with "Yes but only for a few hours until the bottles and brew return to room temperature. 

 

Any more questions, ask away and the borg will sound off. I hope this helps you in your brewing and bottling process just one iota. I once was a newbie and asked many questions and received great advice here.

 

Salud my Friends.

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Like redman74 said, it does help aid in making a clear beer.

 

As an alternate theory, (1) the bottle sediments don't bother me (2) I usually drink my beer from a glass from a screw-top re-usable bottle, so I leave the sediments behind when I pour into the glass.  Typically, you would refrigerate your bottles for several days before drinking them regardless if you cold crash the LBK or not.

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The CC compacts the trube. So less gets in your bottle. FWTW I don't CC SgtPhil is right it'll clear in the bottle.

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Yea, I still get trub in the bottom of my bottles after conditioning even with cold crashing, but it does seem to lesson it somewhat substantially IMO, if you really care about such things. More room for beer is my diluded philosophy, there's only so much beer in the LBK to start with isn't there..

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I always cold crash, because I can.

 

I've moved on to BIAB all grain but still use the LBK's because right now they give me the best option for controlling fermentation temps and the ability to cold crash. (fits in my cooler and fridge)

 

I like it because I batch prime. Bringing the LBK out of a cold fridge and emptying it into a 2nd LBK (w/ my priming sugar) while the trub is cold and stuck to the bottom makes for an easier bottling day. Once it's in the 2nd LBK and LIGHTLY stirred I don't have to worry about trub as much when bottling.

 

I just "tested" a bottle of my 1st all grain today (at just 3 weeks conditioning) and it was clear as could be. (a pale ale)  Going to give it a few more weeks but looking and tasting good!

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Yea, I still get trub in the bottom of my bottles after conditioning even with cold crashing, but it does seem to lesson it somewhat substantially IMO, if you really care about such things. More room for beer is my diluded philosophy, there's only so much beer in the LBK to start with isn't there..

FWIW even if you got no trübe from the bucket, you'll still have trübe in the bottle. It forms as part of the carbonation process.

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FWIW even if you got no trübe from the bucket, you'll still have trübe in the bottle. It forms as part of the carbonation process.

If you share with friends and family that's always a hard thing to get across.

Most people drink from the bottle and it's sometimes a challenge to get them to pour into a glass and leave that little bit in the bottom.

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