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Anybody have an all Mr Beer version of something close to Dragons Milk from Hew Holland brewing?

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Shouldn't be too difficult to replicate. I'll see what I can come up with.

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The main problem with this recipe is the low IBUs. I can get the OG, ABV, and the SRM correct, but it will be double the IBUs due to the HME. Like our Novacaine, this will be a BIG beer. It will need 3 cans to match the ABV of the original recipe (11%). But 3 cans of Irish Stout will give the beer about 60+ IBUs.  I can put together a recipe using only Mr. Beer ingredients, or I can put together a more accurate recipe using some Mr. Beer ingredients plus some unhopped dry malt. Some steeping grains would also help this recipe.

I would recommend you do this in a larger fermenter such as the 8Lx. Otherwise, you may want to keep an eye on this as it ferments. Ferment at lower temps than normal to prevent overflow.

Let me know how you want to proceed.

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Maybe this would be a good recipe to learn a few new techniques like steeping grains. Lets try the more accurate recipe.

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Ok, we're going to try something a bit different here. Let me know what you think.

1 can Bewitched Amber Ale
1 can Oktoberfest Lager
1 pouch Robust LME
4 oz Carapils
4 oz Chocolate Malt
4 oz Black Patent
4 oz Flaked Barley
.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets
Safale US-05 yeast
Whiskey soaked oak chips (soak untoasted or lightly toasted oak chips in whiskey for 2-4 weeks. Feel free to save some of the whiskey to add at bottling. Just don't add too much or your yeast may not carbonate the beer. If kegging, use all the whiskey your heart desires.)

Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Add Robust LME and bring wort to a boil. Add .5 Glacier hops and boil for 5 mins. Remove pot from heat and add HME cans. Stir well. At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. Once a bit cooler, transfer to fermenter (8lx recommended). To the wort, add 1 oz whiskey soaked oak chips and stir really well before adding the yeast (if you want less oak character, add the chips after 1 week fermenting). Ferment for 3 weeks.

Here's why I chose the malts I did. Both the Bewitched Amber Ale and the Oktoberfest are full of darker caramel/crystal malts, the Oktoberfest has a good amount of Munich malts, and both cans are fairly low in IBUs. Looking at the basic recipe on their website, they use caramel malts (which are middle-of-the-road Crystal malts, Crystal 40 and 60 usually) and crystal malts (they use darker Crystal 80 and 120). The main malts they use for color are Black Patent and Chocolate. I added a Robust LME for the extra ABV.

I omitted the Nugget hops since they are really mostly for bittering and the cans already have bittering hops. But the Glacier hops get a 5 minute boil just to add a hint of their unique character into the beer. This should also balance the added malts. Again, this beer is very low IBU for a stout. Most Imperial stouts are at least 50 IBUs.

OG: 1.096 (HUGE beer! Be Careful if using an LBK!)
IBU: 31
ABV: 11%
SRM: 40+

Feel free to tweak it however you like. I may try this one out of sheer curiosity.

From the website: http://newhollandbrew.com/our-beer/dragons-milk/

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Also, I'm moving this to the Advanced Recipes subforum.

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Because St. Patrick's is full of roasted barley. There is no roasted barley in this recipe. It's also too high in IBUs.

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The main problem with this recipe is the low IBUs. I can get the OG, ABV, and the SRM correct, but it will be double the IBUs due to the HME. Like our Novacaine, this will be a BIG beer. It will need 3 cans to match the ABV of the original recipe (11%). But 3 cans of Irish Stout will give the beer about 60+ IBUs.  I can put together a recipe using only Mr. Beer ingredients, or I can put together a more accurate recipe using some Mr. Beer ingredients plus some unhopped dry malt. Some steeping grains would also help this recipe.

I would recommend you do this in a larger fermenter such as the 8Lx. Otherwise, you may want to keep an eye on this as it ferments. Ferment at lower temps than normal to prevent overflow.

Let me know how you want to proceed.

 

I'm not familiar with the pale, robust and smooth extracts, but could you just use a combination of them and add whatever hops you need?  

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Ok, we're going to try something a bit different here. Let me know what you think.

1 can Bewitched Amber Ale

1 can Oktoberfest Lager

1 pouch Robust LME

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

Safale US-05 yeast

Whiskey soaked oak chips (soak untoasted or lightly toasted oak chips in whiskey for 2-4 weeks. Feel free to save some of the whiskey to add at bottling. Just don't add too much or your yeast may not carbonate the beer. If kegging, use all the whiskey your heart desires.)

Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Add Robust LME and bring wort to a boil. Add .5 Glacier hops and boil for 5 mins. Remove pot from heat and add HME cans. Stir well. At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. Once a bit cooler, transfer to fermenter (8lx recommended). To the wort, add 1 oz whiskey soaked oak chips and stir really well before adding the yeast (if you want less oak character, add the chips after 1 week fermenting). Ferment for 3 weeks.

Here's why I chose the malts I did. Both the Bewitched Amber Ale and the Oktoberfest are full of darker caramel/crystal malts, the Oktoberfest has a good amount of Munich malts, and both cans are fairly low in IBUs. Looking at the basic recipe on their website, they use caramel malts (which are middle-of-the-road Crystal malts, Crystal 40 and 60 usually) and crystal malts (they use darker Crystal 80 and 120). The main malts they use for color are Black Patent and Chocolate. I added a Robust LME for the extra ABV.

I omitted the Nugget hops since they are really mostly for bittering and the cans already have bittering hops. But the Glacier hops get a 5 minute boil just to add a hint of their unique character into the beer. This should also balance the added malts. Again, this beer is very low IBU for a stout. Most Imperial stouts are at least 50 IBUs.

OG: 1.096 (HUGE beer! Be Careful if using an LBK!)

IBU: 31

ABV: 11%

SRM: 40+

Feel free to tweak it however you like. I may try this one out of sheer curiosity.

From the website: http://newhollandbrew.com/our-beer/dragons-milk/

I got to be honest this looks pretty intimidating, but I'm going to give it a try.

 

So I guess I'll be making a trip to my LHBS, I didn't see these items on the Mr Beer site, for the 

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

And tosted Oak Chips

 

If I can get all the ingredients together in time I'll put this in the LBK once I bottle my Belgian Spiced Ale in about 2 weeks. Yea I'm going to try it in my LBK, so far I have good luck moving the LBK to my basement to keep the temps down during fermenting.

 

Thanks for putting this together.

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I got to be honest this looks pretty intimidating, but I'm going to give it a try.

 

So I guess I'll be making a trip to my LHBS, I didn't see these items on the Mr Beer site, for the 

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

And tosted Oak Chips

 

If I can get all the ingredients together in time I'll put this in the LBK once I bottle my Belgian Spiced Ale in about 2 weeks. Yea I'm going to try it in my LBK, so far I have good luck moving the LBK to my basement to keep the temps down during fermenting.

 

Thanks for putting this together.

 

I wouldn't feel too guilty, that's about $3 worth of stuff.  :D

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I wouldn't feel too guilty, that's about $3 worth of stuff.  :D

 Thanks I had no idea if it was $3 or $30. Do most LHBS sell these items in these small, they seem small to me, quantities?

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Yes they should sell grains in small quantities, down to the ounce. Most grains are a couple $ a pound or less. Hops (pellets) are a couple bucks an ounce at the most.

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 Thanks I had no idea if it was $3 or $30. Do most LHBS sell these items in these small, they seem small to me, quantities?

I have got as little as 1/4oz from my LHBS. (costs me $.50)

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I have got as little as 1/4oz from my LHBS. (costs me $.50)

 

I can buy any amount I want, because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it, and bag it.  1/4 oz for $.50 is highway robbery at $1.99 per pound it should be $.03.  What could you possibly use 1/4 oz in?  Or did you mean 1/4 pound?

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Hmm.. this does sound interesting (for a couple of reasons, one is that my wife makes a soap with our goat milk using a fragrance oil called dragon's blood) and I've got just the right size conical fermenter to brew it in since it's just a little bigger than my 2 LBKs.

Thanks for posting/sharing this, Tony

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Had a friend recommend Dragon's Milk to me so I bought some. Had too much booze taste for me.

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I can buy any amount I want, because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it, and bag it.  1/4 oz for $.50 is highway robbery at $1.99 per pound it should be $.03.  What could you possibly use 1/4 oz in?  Or did you mean 1/4 pound?

Depends on who's working, the owner lets me grind my own.  The manager prefers to do it himself(unless he has a lot of customers)

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Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it . . .

 

Depends on who's working, the owner lets me grind my own. . . 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

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Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

 

You rinse them over the wort. Lift the straining bag up out of the wort after the steep, let it drain over the wort (a large mesh colander works well for this) and rinse the bag with 1 cup of water. Let the bag finish draining the water you just poured over the bag, then remove the bag from the colander and throw it away. The rinsing will help flush some extra sugars/dextrines/color into the wort.

The ideal pitching temp is between 60 and 70, but this can also depend on the yeast and the flavor profile you're trying to get. The yeast are going to produce a different flavor profile when pitched into 80 degree wort vs 65 degree wort. You will get a lot more fruity esters and possibly some fusels with a high pitch temp. But when using neutral yeasts, the rule of thumb is below 70 degrees to prevent off-flavors such as acetaldehyde and diacetyl. And since most off-flavors are produced within the first 72 hours of fermentation, during this time it's crucial that you get your wort down to a proper temperature and keep it consistent.

Yes, you will need the grains milled. Your LHBS should have a mill on hand. You don't need the grains pulverized, just nicely cracked.

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Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

 

 

You would rinse them over the pot so that more goodness goes into the wort.  With steeping it is not necessary.  

 

Depends on the yeast.  Look it up at the yeast manufacturer - for S05 I would pitch anywhere in the 60s.

 

Grains must be milled for steeping.  In the absence of a mill, you can keep them in plastic bag and use a rolling pin on them.  

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You would rinse them over the pot so that more goodness goes into the wort.  With steeping it is not necessary.  

Yeah, if your mostly steeping specialty grains, rinsing isn't really that necessary since there aren't really any fermentables in them. I still do it anyway, especially when using grains for color. It's personal preference really.

Also, it's a matter of debate whether to squeeze the bag or not to squeeze the bag. I tend to just give it a very gentle squeeze. Too much will risk harsh tannins getting into your beer, especially when using darker malts (Carafa is an exception since it's usually dehusked/debittered.).

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I poke the bag with my tongs.   :D

 

Ok at first glance I thought this said tongue, :lol: it's been a long day at work. 

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That would be one burnt tongue at 150+ degrees.

Not if you're a dragon.

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Also, it's a matter of debate whether to squeeze the bag or not to squeeze the bag. I tend to just give it a very gentle squeeze. Too much will risk harsh tannins getting into your beer, especially when using darker malts (Carafa is an exception since it's usually dehusked/debittered.).

I agree, your not trying to make OJ just get a little more color out.

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Oh!! I just found this thread! Sorry I'm late to the discussion, fellas, I've been working on this for the past few days & am trying to stay exclusively with MrB ingredients as much as possible. Since the grain bills aren't listed in the HME descriptions, I've been playing detective & doing my best to figure out which MrB malts would get me the closest to what's listed on New Holland's page. Here's what I came up with:

1 can Bewitched Amber

1 can Octoberfest Lager

1 pouch BrewMax Robust

1 packet Safale 05 yeast

1 packet Glacier hops

1 packet Warrior hops?

I provide:

1 cup Flaked Barley

1.5 oz. Oak cubes-Medium toast soaked in bourbon for one week

1 vanilla bean split & scraped

1) Sanitize as usual.

2) bring 4 cups of water to a boil & add flaked barley (in a hop sack)

3) slowly add Robust LME to boiling water stirring constantly then turn off heat

4) add Glacier hops (in a hop sack)

5) add cans of HME & stir until thoroughly mixed

6) remove flaked barley then keg as usual adding the bourbon soaked oak cubes & vanilla bean to LBK

Bottle after 3 weeks in the LBK & bottle condition 6 months to a year (sampling every 90 days to check progress).

My plan is to either make 2 batches or do a split batch so I can do a bittering boil with the Warrior hops & flavor/aroma boil with the Glacier. I'm not sure how the extracts will handle a 45-60 minute boil but I have a mild concern with the IBUs being off, hence 2 batches. My goal is to make the recipe as simple as possible so it'll be easy for beginner & intermediate MrB brewers to do without being too intimidated. Advanced guys will tweak it to their liking. I plan on calling it Dragon Slayer.

Questions, comments, critiques, suggestions.. please comment.

Thanx & Happy Brewing!

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That recipe will work, but it won't be nearly the same color, therefore it won't be a stout. In fact, it will be more of a brown color than black and it would be missing a lot of the body. The steeping grains I recommended are what gives this beer its color and body. Also, there's no need for the Warrior hops because they are for bittering and the cans of malt already have the bittering hops in them. The bittering hops won't impart any unique flavors.  And, as mentioned many times on these forums, never boil your HME.

There's really no way to make this recipe any more simple with Mr. Beer products without deviating from the original recipe entirely. 

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Thank you, JoshR, I sincerely appreciate & respect your opinion.

Yea, I wasn't sure about the color either, but I thought it would still be "black" after I saw this (note the color profile):

http://www.mrbeer.com/vlad-the-impale-ale-recipe

May not technically be a "stout" (10%+ ABV!?) but as dark as I could get it while staying as close to the grain bill as I thought I could with MrB extracts.

I'm a little worried about the mouthfeel too, was considering leaving out the flaked barley altogether because its not from MrB, but I figured without it the beer wouldn't even come close & be very disappointing. After the first batch I'll see what it's like & add more if its just way too thin.

As far as the boil goes, I've only seen it stated that boiling the HMEs kills the hops already added by the manufacturer. That's kinda the point in this recipe, & the reason for a split batch. My biggest concern with boiling the HME's is overboiling. Normally I wouldn't add extract until late in the boil so I'm not sure how it'll respond to a full boil, hence the 45-60 min boil time (usually always 60).

I think there's no possible way to make a "clone" that's not mostly AG & without making this beer at the New Holland brewery it'll never be 100% anyway IMO. Using all MrB stuff (as much as is available anyway) is the REAL challenge for me. In posting this initial recipe before I've actually tested it, I'm hoping for a collaborative effort over the typical "mines bigger than yours.." attitude common in other forums. In fact, I wasn't even gonna post this recipe until after tweaking a few test batches, but since the discussion is already out there I didn't wanna miss out on the fun!

Cheers!

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Keep in mind that the recipe you linked only has one can of malt plus the robust LME. Your recipe calls for 2 cans of pale malts which will dilute the color by about half. According to Beersmith, your beer will be about 14 SRM, which is equivalent to a red ale. It will look like the beer below.

redale2.jpg

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Got it. I don't use Beersmith, I'm an old-school tastesmith guy.

In that case, I'll consider adding 2 Robust LMEs to compensate for the 2 amber HMEs, although I think the darker flavors may end up too strong for the style (I use the word loosely) I'm going for. I just don't wanna steep a bunch of grains so as to keep in the spirit of the game.

I guess if it ultimately turns out as a red I'll have to call it Dragon's Blood.

Could go 1 robust and 1 smooth...

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Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

 

Ok in order.

 

1) you rinse the grains and bag to get more of the sugars out. SO add it to your wort.

 

2) 68f

 

3) yes, just crack 'em open not pulverized.

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Speaking of squeezing your grain bag: Not long ago I did a bunch of reading on BIAB. The current consensus seems to be that the belief that squeezing the grain bag extracts excess tannins is a myth. Tannins are supposed to be extracted by high temperature and/or high pH. Keep it below 170 deg. F and squeeze away.

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Could go 1 robust and 1 smooth...

Good idea, Vakko. I wonder how that would affect the flavor profile & carbonation. I feel like I'm pushing the ABV limit of the yeast for decent carbing as is. Perhaps I could add a stronger yeast at bottling, but again that may also adversely alter the flavor considering the bottle conditioning time. Its a work in progress so I really appreciate the suggestions.

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..the recipe you linked only has one can of malt plus the robust LME. Your recipe calls for 2 cans of pale malts which will dilute the color by about half.

I've been thinking about the color issue..

Here's my thought: since the batch size is the same as the Vlad recipe & it uses the Bewitched & Robust extracts, adding a can of Octoberfest shouldn't dilute the color. If anything it might darken it a bit more or at least have no effect. I know I could be wrong, but it makes sense to me.

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Ok in order.

 

1) you rinse the grains and bag to get more of the sugars out. SO add it to your wort.

 

2) 68f

 

3) yes, just crack 'em open not pulverized.

 

3 great big thumbs up

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I guess if it ultimately turns out as a red I'll have to call it Dragon's Blood.

 

I'm thinking if this turns out good I'll be calling mine Dragon Drool Stout

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I've been thinking about the color issue..

Here's my thought: since the batch size is the same as the Vlad recipe (SRM 34) & it uses the Bewitched & Robust extracts, adding a can of Octoberfest shouldn't dilute the color. If anything it might darken it a bit more or at least have no effect. I know I could be wrong, but it makes sense to me.

 

 

Yes, good point. It was the end of the day and I don't know what I was thinking :blink: . With that said, the Oktoberfest will only add 1 point to the SRM. Therefore, upon looking at the Vlad the ImPale recipe, I'm convinced the SRM is incorrect. In fact, I think it's WAY off. With the malts in that beer, the SRM should only be around 13, not 34. I will get this fixed ASAP.

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Picked up the grains for this last night at my LHBS, but forgot the toasted oak chips. One of my other hobbies real smoked BBQ so I have oak chips, since these are going to be soaking in Bourbon could I just take the oak chips I have for BBQ, toast them in a skillet and then soak in the bourbon? I guess my question is, is there anything special about the chips I'd get at the LHBS?

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Other than they're toasted to different levels (i.e. light, medium) which will effect the flavor. Stick yours in an oven at like 250 and toast 'em yourself.  I did it in a toaster oven and only lightly toasted 'em for 40 min which is also how I sterilized them. Use a bag, I didn't the first try and got chips in my spigot...really slowed down the bottling.

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Whiskey soaked oak chips (soak untoasted or lightly toasted oak chips in whiskey for 2-4 weeks. 

 

 

What quantity of oak chips? I just filled a pint jar about half way and covered with Jameson. Too much, not enough, just right?

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And now that I read the spec sheet I wish I would have used a Kentucky bourbon like Makers Mark. How much of a difference do you think the Jameson vas Makers will make in the final flavor? 

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I was wondering why you went with an Irish whisky, myself. But, it may have just been what you had on hand, who am I to judge?

 

I think the flavours will be a little muted compared to if you had used a nice bourbon. But I doubt it will be bad.

 

 :)

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I was wondering why you went with an Irish whisky, myself. But, it may have just been what you had on hand, who am I to judge?

 

I think the flavours will be a little muted compared to if you had used a nice bourbon. But I doubt it will be bad.

 

  :)

 

All I have on hard right now is Jameson, Yukon Jack and just a bit of Jack Daniel's Single Barrel Select, but I only used about half the wood chips but. That said even if there was enough of the Single Barrel it's a bit pricey to use for this. I think I'll stop at the liquer store tomorrow and pick up a bottle of regular Jack or Makers to soak the rest of the chips. 

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Personally, for a recipe, I wouldn't go too expensive. Evan Williams black would probably be just as good, and quite a bit cheaper. Use the rest to mix with some ginger ale.

 

 :)

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The order with the cans I need to make this came yesterday. So I plan on brewing this weekend. But I may have jumped the gun a bit when I bought the grains about 3 weeks ago. How long will the milled grains last in the refrigerator? They were inexpensive so if 3 weeks is pushing it I can just buy them again.

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If the grains have been refrigerated, they'll be fine. I keep mine in the freezer until time to brew.

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I just put this in the LBK, the OG 1.093 @ 66. 

 

Now a couple of questions.

 

When I steeped the grains I didn't do a very good job of keeping the temp at 160, my range was as low as 130 to 190. What if anything will this do to the beer?

 

Also when I rinsed the grains with 1 cup of water the liquid that came out was really dark. So I did this again, actually I ended up rinsing with 4 cups of hot water and gave the bag a good squeeze. Did I do the right thing or should I have stopped with only 1 cup of rinse water?

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Well, above 170 and it's possible to get bitter compounds out of the grains. That's the reason so many mash tuns are made out of water coolers. For steeping specialty grains, a small cooler (1-2 gallons) works well, just be sure to preheat it with some hot water for a few minutes first so you aren't using your "strike water" to heat the cooler.

 

The sparge (rinsing the grains) is fine, you might have gotten better extraction using the 4 cups of water. Squeezing the bag is a bit of a hot topic. Some say don't do it at all. Some say it's OK as long as you don't go above that 170° mark.

 

I am sure more experienced brewers will come in and give more & better info.

 

Good luck, and keep us in the loop how this comes out!

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Heat water to 165. Turn off flame. Put in grain bag, put on lid. Temp will be fine.

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Well hopefully the increased temp during the steeping doesn't have too much of a detrimental affect. I can say it smelled and tasted pretty good. It's gonna kill me to wait till I can try this batch.

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I might be talking out of my butt here, but you weren't using a lot of the specialty grains, so it probably won't be a big deal if you did extract some tannins. Heck, with the specialty grains, it might not even be an issue, and only be a thing for the base malts - but again, I am talking out of my butt on this.

 

 :)

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OG: 1.096 (HUGE beer! Be Careful if using an LBK!)

Feel free to tweak it however you like. I may try this one out of sheer curiosity

 

 

Due Josh's warning and the fact that the warm weather we've been having this spring has brought the air temp in my basement up to about 66 to 68. I placed the LBK in my cooler for this batch. I've been changing ice packs twice a day and have so far managed to keep the stick on temp to 64-66. It looks like the fermentation is progressing and so far I've not had any overflows or other problems. And I must say the aroma when I open the cooler in the morning is absolutely wonderful, I can't wait to try this beer.

 

Also Josh, have you tried this? If so how's it working out for you?

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I haven't yet. Let me know how it turns out.

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Status update please!

(You have silent followers.....)

Haha

Any overflow yet? How long are you going to condition this beer?

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Surprisingly I have not had any overflows or even a very active Krausen. I'm hoping it because I've been trying to keep this beer cool (below 64) while fermenting and not because it has stalled. It still smells wonderful every time I open the cooler to check the temp. Today is day 10 so I think I may pull it out of the cooler and let it finish at my ambient basement temp of about 66 to 68. 

 

How long to condition? Well I'm sure this would benefit from months. But to be realistic I'll probably start sampling bottles at 2 weeks, I have absolutely no patience when it come to waiting to try my beers. Hopefully I can manage to keep a few long enough to taste at 6 months. Most likely if I try this after a few weeks I'll just start another batch right away so I have some to condition longer.

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I'd imagine this is a beer that would do well with longer conditioning times. My guess is that it would hit its peak in 4-6 months.

 

Good luck with your patience! Just know you are not alone - I have a case of Novacaine I am sitting on, it will be Christmas or NYE before I crack one open for the first time. You can do it, brother!

 

  :D

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I'd imagine this is a beer that would do well with longer conditioning times. My guess is that it would hit its peak in 4-6 months.

 

Good luck with your patience! Just know you are not alone - I have a case of Novacaine I am sitting on, it will be Christmas or NYE before I crack one open for the first time. You can do it, brother!

 

  :D

Same here. I haven't tried one. I had a sip on bottling day and it tasted good then so I'm not worried one bit.

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Since I was shuffling my LBK's tonight to get my Robust Aztec into the fridge for the Cold Crash. Even though it's only been in the LBK for 12 days I decided to take a SG reading of the Dragons Milk It's currently at 1.024 @ 68, started at 1.092 @ 64 the screwy brewer calculator says that's 9% ABV. I'm hoping to see that drop down to about 1.010 in the next 10 days.

 

Tasted the sample. First impression is Smokey Oak, then as that fades I'm getting the Jameson. Hopefully the Oak & Jameson will mellow a bit as this conditions. I'm wondering if I should pull the Oak Chips out of the LBK for the last week, thoughts? is there a way to do that without risking contamination?

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Fermenting for 18 days, took a SG reading tonight 1.022 @ 68, that has me at about 9.3% ABV. Seems like it ma have stalled. I'm looking for suggestions bring it up from my basement with an air temp of 68 to my kitchen with a temp of 72 for a few days? Or just leave it go in the basement for another week?

 

The Oak flavor is still present but has already mellowed a bit from just a week ago, and the distinctive Jameson flavor is gone. I like this enough I could drink it just like this with out carbing.

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Well, the actual beer is only 10%ABV, and you are close to that. Maybe the yeast has reached peak attenuation? 1.022 is decent for a big beer, and I imagine this brew has a good bit of un-fermentable sugars anyway. I am looking at .002 difference in gravity over a week's time, so I am betting this one done.

 

Move it up to the kitchen, give it another 3 days if you want, & check gravity again. I am betting it won't have changed.

 

If you think it tastes good now, just imagine what it will taste like in a few months!

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Well, the actual beer is only 10%ABV, and you are close to that. Maybe the yeast has reached peak attenuation? 1.022 is decent for a big beer, and I imagine this brew has a good bit of un-fermentable sugars anyway. I am looking at .002 difference in gravity over a week's time, so I am betting this one done.

 

Move it up to the kitchen, give it another 3 days if you want, & check gravity again. I am betting it won't have changed.

 

If you think it tastes good now, just imagine what it will taste like in a few months!

 

Forgive my inexperience.

 

But how do you know the beer is only 10%, Josh's recipe indicated 11%?

 

Also other beers I'm making are going down to 1.010 to 1.008 range, so why shouldn't this one?

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Forgive my inexperience.

 

But how do you know the beer is only 10%, Josh's recipe indicated 11%?

 

Also other beers I'm making are going down to 1.010 to 1.008 range, so why shouldn't this one?

 

QBrew puts this at 9.4%, with an OG of 1.097 and an FG of 1.024.  

 

This won't go down as low due to unfermentable sugars, as was mentioned.  They cannot ferment, they keep gravity higher.

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QBrew puts this at 9.4%, with an OG of 1.097 and an FG of 1.024.  

 

This won't go down as low due to unfermentable sugars, as was mentioned.  They cannot ferment, they keep gravity higher.

 

I've downloaded & installed QBrew but haven't spent the time to figure it out yet. I'm on vacation next week with nothing to do but yard work and the honey do list, maybe I'll need to add learn QBrew near the top of the list.

 

Also think I'll move the LBK to the cooler and put it in the corner of the kitchen till Monday, then do the cold crash.

 

Both you and slym2none mention the unfermentable sugars, does QBrew tell you that they exist or are you getting that from something else?

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Forgive my inexperience.

 

But how do you know the beer is only 10%, Josh's recipe indicated 11%?

 

Also other beers I'm making are going down to 1.010 to 1.008 range, so why shouldn't this one?

 

I looked up Dragon's Milk on BeerAdvocate.com, they claim it is a 10% ABV beer.

 

The other beers you are making, are they as high-gravity? A good "rule of thumb" is you'll finish at 75% of your OG "gravity points", so if you have a brew that starts at 1.100, it will probably finish at 1.025; if it starts at 1.050, you'll likely finish out at 1.012 or so. This all depends on the yeast, of course, and I see you are using US-05, where 75% attenuation is about right. And again, there will be a good amount of unfermentable sugars in these big beers.

 

:)

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the Dragon's Milk sold in stores is labeled as 11% ABV, I literally just drank one.  i'd have to look back through this thread or other threads to see what the clone is... and i'm too lazy to do that, or that 11% is working... 

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Take it up with BeerAdvocate.com

 

  ;)   :P   :)

 

 *EDIT*

 

Just looked again, BA says that 2014 bottles are 11%, so I guess 2015 bottles are the 10% ones.

 

I am going out on a limb and saying that if I were trying to make something like Dragon's Milk and I ended up around 9-1/2%, I'd not feel too badly about it.

 

 :D

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Bottled this tonight FG 1.021 gives me an ABV of 9.5%. Wow even flat I love this beer, dark rich creamy and full of flavor. I'm gonna try and condition this for a couple months, but it's gonna be tough to wait.

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I was able to forget about this in the corner of the basement, traveling to India for 5 weeks helped. Anyway I put one in the fridge last week and decided to try it tonight. The color is dark and the flavor is rich. But let me tell you this beer has some fire. In fact you can still easily make out the Jameson that I used to soak the chips, I would have thought that after 7 months this would have mellowed a bit. I think I'll try and forget about it again for a few more months.

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