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Sping Valley Brewster

Priming

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Just received free capper and bottles. The family is looking out for me and finding supplies for free or next to nothing. I'll give it a try for free, why not. How much sugar do I need for a 12 oz bottle.

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Look into batch priming as it is less hassle and more consistent. Assuming the temperature was in the mid 60's during the whole fermentation you batch prime with 1.5oz boiled and cooled cane sugar into a bottling container. This is dependent on style of beer and desired carbonation. Most people use the slim line container from walmart. The bottling wand fits perfectly in the spot. Be sure not to splash the beer as it will cause aeration. Use the calculator Mr. Johnson suggested to make adjustments based on volume and fermentation temp (Sample Below.) One thing to consider before using this method or any method is cold crashing.

 

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I use 3/4 tsp of granulated sugar per 12oz bottle & a small stainless steel funnel. Tried using honey once but didn't like the result, carbonation was a little low.

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Here's MrBeer's handy chart for priming sugar.  I've found that these amounts are a bit high, and reducing them by about 1/3 works well.

 

PrimingSugarChart2015.PNG

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Mr?? My aren't we formal.  :lol:

 

I believe that Mr. Johnson has other meanings...   :lol:

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I use 3/4 tsp of granulated sugar per 12oz bottle & a small stainless steel funnel. Tried using honey once but didn't like the result, carbonation was a little low.

It seems to take honey longer to carb.

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It seems to take honey longer to carb.

For certain. It was a bit of a pain to work with too. I didn't want to heat it up in the microwave because I thought "nuking" it was a bad idea. It was thick & slow. I figure not as much went into the bottles as I wanted because, despite my best efforts, there was some stuck to my funnel & measuring spoon. I didn't really get the honey flavor I was hoping for either.

In retrospect, if I ever decide to use it again, I'll heat it up 1st by leaving the jar in hot water for several minutes &/or batch prime. I doubt it'll come to that though, table sugar's cheap & easy.

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Right, you won't get any honey flavor using it for bottling.  Takes a while for people to understand that yeast eats sugars, and sugars what provide the flavoring for a lot of things - so when the sugar is gone, either isn't much left or there are lousy flavors left (i.e. molasses).  

 

Cheap table sugar #1.

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If you're going to batch prime, be very accurate on how much beer you're actually going to bottle.  The LBK can be misleading because the top volume line doesn't account for the trub you're not going to bottle (unless you're trub bottle guy; bleh).

 

Luckily, you use a secondary (like the slimline) to combine your sugar.  Don't assume the volume that will go into your secondary (bottle bucket, slimline, etc).  Fill it with your beer first, get an accurate measurement, then add the correct amount of sugar.  I haven't bottled 8L in a few batches now.

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What I did was measure out water with a measuring cup and filled it up and marked it at 2g, 2.25g, and 2.5g. I don't trust the fill lines already on the slimline even though they were roughly accurate.

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Don't disagree with anything said.  That said, when I batch prime I calculate the amount of sugar needed for 5 gallons, divide by 2 (2.5 gallon slimline), and make the sugar solution, then dump it in.  When I bottle I get anywhere from 566 - 610 ounces per 5 gallon batch, or 88.4% - 95.3% of 5 gallons, with most batches 590 - 600).

 

The key here is to get the correct amount of carbonation that you like.  So, if I use 65 grams of sugar for a planned 2.5 gallon batch, and it comes in at 90% (2.25 gallons) of that, it's like I used 72 grams for 2.5 gallons.  The difference, 7 grams, is less than what's in a packet of yeast.  In short, it doesn't make any noticeable difference.  What's a noticeable difference is putting in 1/3 less, or 1/3 more sugar.

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For certain. It was a bit of a pain to work with too. I didn't want to heat it up in the microwave because I thought "nuking" it was a bad idea. It was thick & slow. I figure not as much went into the bottles as I wanted because, despite my best efforts, there was some stuck to my funnel & measuring spoon. I didn't really get the honey flavor I was hoping for either.

In retrospect, if I ever decide to use it again, I'll heat it up 1st by leaving the jar in hot water for several minutes &/or batch prime. I doubt it'll come to that though, table sugar's cheap & easy.

I batch prime so I let the honey jar set in hot water for about 10 min.(like an HME) then I boiled the priming water(1/2 cup) adding the honey to that.  You do not get honey flavor from honey. Use Honey Malt for honey flavor 

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I batch prime so I let the honey jar set in hot water for about 10 min.(like an HME) then I boiled the priming water(1/2 cup) adding the honey to that.  You do not get honey flavor from honey. Use Honey Malt for honey flavor 

What about steeping some honey-nut cheerios?

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Don't know, if they are artificially flavored then maybe.

Honey Nut Cheerios: Whole Grain Oats (includes the oat bran), Modified Corn Starch, Honey,Brown Sugar Syrup, Salt, Tripotassium Phosphate, Canola and/or Rice Bran Oil, Natural Almond Flavor, 

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I can't wait for you guys to see our next collaboration recipe....it should be coming out this weekend. ;)

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I can't wait for you guys to see our next collaboration recipe....it should be coming out this weekend. ;)

It better be some kind of ipa... I'm really starting to like the ones that don't taste like feet or burnt dirt.   B)

 

Additionally, my Belgian Trippel came out amazingly, Josh.  I can't wait for it to carb up a bit.

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It better be some kind of ipa... I'm really starting to like the ones that don't taste like feet or burnt dirt.   B)

Unfortunately, it's not because we already have an IPA collaboration going (Barley's "CHIPA"). But I can tell you that it definitely doesn't taste like feet or burnt dirt. Let's just say it might remind you of your childhood. ;)

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A Yoohoo Stout?!  Or Lemonade Maibock?  Oh wait... is it a Kool-aid Schwarzbier?

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Excellent guesses, but I think this one might be even a bit more extreme. But I will guarantee it tastes amazing! Much better than I had expected. I was a skeptic at first, but now I'm a convert. But I can't say anymore about it right now. You'll just have to wait until this weekend. :ph34r:

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Excellent guesses, but I think this one might be even a bit more extreme. But I will guarantee it tastes amazing! Much better than I had expected. I was a skeptic at first, but now I'm a convert. But I can't say anymore about it right now. You'll just have to wait until this weekend. :ph34r:

-_-

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I've heard about a S'more Stout...  :huh:

 

And a peanut butter porter... :o

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I bottled my first ever batch (CAL). It's only been 1 week(I know they need 3). All were filled except 1, which was only half full(I added a shot of Beam just for the hell of it, still on 3/4 full. That 1 bottle is hard but all the rest are not. Should I be alarmed?

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I bottled my first ever batch (CAL). It's only been 1 week(I know they need 3). All were filled except 1, which was only half full(I added a shot of Beam just for the hell of it, still on 3/4 full. That 1 bottle is hard but all the rest are not. Should I be alarmed?

No. Just give them more time.

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I can't wait for you guys to see our next collaboration recipe....it should be coming out this weekend. ;)

Something tells me it includes honey nut cheerios.

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Something tells me it includes honey nut cheerios.

Close, but no cigar for you. All will be revealed in 2 days. ;)

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When you have more headspace, that means you have less liquid. That smaller amount of liquid will tend to carbonate faster.

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Honey Nut Cheerios: Whole Grain Oats (includes the oat bran), Modified Corn Starch, Honey,Brown Sugar Syrup, Salt, Tripotassium Phosphate, Canola and/or Rice Bran Oil, Natural Almond Flavor, 

I said I didn't know. I don't eat cold cereal, never have wasn't allowed to, so I never developed the taste for 'em.( tried some in the mess hall but they all tasted like sweetened cardboard to me) I couldn't tell you what's in corn flakes...beyond the obvious. 

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When you have more headspace, that means you have less liquid. That smaller amount of liquid will tend to carbonate faster.

makes sense. Thanks!

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And the last bottle has more trub in it, which makes it carb faster.

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And the last bottle has more trub in it, which makes it carb faster.

also makes sense! I wasn't sure if what I added affected it at all.

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I can't wait for you guys to see our next collaboration recipe....it should be coming out this weekend. ;)

Cerealously!!! I gotta try it!
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Using the Priming calculator it ask for the beer temperature, which I know is supposed to be the warmest temperature. But what is my warmest temperature? For the last batch I bottled, I pitched into 72 degree wort. Then took my LBK to the basement and over the next couple of hours it dropped to 64 degrees where ti stayed for the first 4 or 5 days of active fermentation. After that it dropped down to about 62 and stayed there until I cold crashed.

 

So what temp should I have used in the screwy Brewer Calculator 72, 64 or 62? 

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64, if that was peak during fermentation.  Pitching doesn't count.

 

If you play around you will see the differences between 64 and 62 aren't huge, but 72 would be more.

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64, if that was peak during fermentation.  Pitching doesn't count.

 

If you play around you will see the differences between 64 and 62 aren't huge, but 72 would be more.

Thanks, RickBeer.

 

My thought was 64, and that's what I used. Also I did play around with the calculator and like you said didn't see a huge difference.

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So now it's been 4 weeks(in the bottles) and I put a couple in the fridge. Still, the one that was 3/4 full is rock hard and the rest aren't quite as carbed. Does this sound like an issue? I used the Mr. Beer carb drops (2 ea./750ml).

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Came out pretty good. A little cloudy, no head. But, Not by for my first attempt! My next batch(surly dog IPA) will be ready to cold crash this weekend. Smells amazing! Should be a much tastier brew!

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Enough of the collaboration recipes already.

Come out with a good yeasts  of your own,  offer 1lb packages of DME ad LME, and more hops.

Leave the off the wall stuff up to Sam Calagione

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Enough of the collaboration recipes already.

 

They are very popular. In fact, we sell out of them each month.

 

 

 

Come out with a good yeasts  of your own,  offer 1lb packages of DME ad LME, and more hops.

 

We do have good yeasts of our own (well, I like them anyway). The Coopers yeasts are proprietary strains. And the other yeasts we use (Danstar and Fermentis) are among the most popular yeasts in the world.

1 lb packages of DME/LME are a bit overkill for our 2 gallon kits. We cater to beginning and casual brewers and our LME/DME sizes are sufficient for their needs.

 

Our hop selection is sufficient for the beginning brewer. There's no need for us to order exotic hops that only a few people will buy because they will go bad, and that costs us money.

 

 

Leave the off the wall stuff up to Sam Calagione

 

Our Collaboration recipes are hardly "off-the-wall". They are very simple recipes that anyone can make with our LBKs. With the exception of the Lucky Charms milks stout, all of our collaboration recipes have been pretty normal and easy to make recipes, all within BJCP style guidelines.

We appreciate your input, but please keep in mind that Mr. Beer is here to make brewing simple. Our recipes are formulated for 2 gallons, and they are intended to be made within 30 minutes (minus the fermentation/carbonation time, of course) rather than several hours. Adding extra steps or extra ingredients defeats the purpose of keeping it simple. I hope this clears things up. 

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They are very popular. In fact, we sell out of them each month.

 

 

 

We do have good yeasts of our own (well, I like them anyway). The Coopers yeasts are proprietary strains. And the other yeasts we use (Danstar and Fermentis) are among the most popular yeasts in the world.

1 lb packages of DME/LME are a bit overkill for our 2 gallon kits. We cater to beginning and casual brewers and our LME/DME sizes are sufficient for their needs.

 

Our hop selection is sufficient for the beginning brewer. There's no need for us to order exotic hops that only a few people will buy because they will go bad, and that costs us money.

 

 

 

Our Collaboration recipes are hardly "off-the-wall". They are very simple recipes that anyone can make with our LBKs. With the exception of the Lucky Charms milks stout, all of our collaboration recipes have been pretty normal and easy to make recipes, all within BJCP style guidelines.

We appreciate your input, but please keep in mind that Mr. Beer is here to make brewing simple. Our recipes are formulated for 2 gallons, and they are intended to be made within 30 minutes (minus the fermentation/carbonation time, of course) rather than several hours. Adding extra steps or extra ingredients defeats the purpose of keeping it simple. I hope this clears things up. 

Remember the key word K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid).

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