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Cerealiously Lucky Charms - Collaboration Recipe NOW AVAILABLE!!

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Remember those weekends in your childhood when you would watch the Saturday morning cartoons while eating heavily sugared cereal in your pajamas? One brewery wants you to vicariously relive those moments through their beer. Introducing the “Cerealiously Lucky Charms™” milk stout from Black Bottle Brewing Company in Fort Collins, CO.

Black Bottle brewery set out to make a joke beer using “Count Chocula” Cereal. The beer turned out fantastic, so with full support from General Mills™, they decided to bring it out to the public. For each limited batch they use a rich milk stout base and a different cereal each month. This month is “Lucky Charms™”.

This rich and silky full-bodied stout has notes of roasted barley, chocolate, and espresso with a sweet marshmallow finish. It’s guaranteed to take you back to those lazy Saturday mornings as a kid. So go ahead, kick up your feet, turn on some cartoons, and enjoy your cereal in beer form. It’s magically delicious!

http://www.mrbeer.com/cerealiously-lucky-charms-milk-stout-collaboration-recipe

Recipe-CLCMilkStout-Home.jpg

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Yuck... Always hated Lucky Charms, but Count Chocula was nice, although I was a Cocoa Puffs and Cocoa Krispies fan.

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Ok Rick...so far you hate Creamsicles, Belgian beer, and Lucky Charms. Anything else, like kids on your lawn or loud rock and roll music?  :lol:  

 

 

Edit: Seriously though...Count Chocula destroys Lucky Charms. No contest.

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Gerry, you seem to be paying way too much attention to my likes and dislikes... ☺

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This will be my 3rd stout in fermentation with 2 bottled....It HAD to be a stout didn't LOL

 

I found a picture of RickBeer on facebook :lol: .

 

 

 

 

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Gerry, you seem to be paying way too much attention to my likes and dislikes... ☺

 

I print out every one of them and hang them in my Rick Shrine.  :wub:

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"But honey... you're supposed to be drinking this beer Saturday mornings while watching cartoons... It said so on the box."

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I print out every one of them and hang them in my Rick Shrine.  :wub:

Duh. Forgot about that. Many do worship me.   :huh:

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At the 1 week mark, sanitize your third hop sack, place 1 cup Lucky Charms into it, tie the hop sack closed, then trim away excess material.

OK, so somebody tell me why the Lucky Charms would not introduce any unwanted bugs into the beer? Is it because of the sugar coating keeping them clean or the alcohol present by this time being able to kill anything on the cereal?

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I have to agree with rick on this one, just cant imagine brewing this one, heck Liver Wurst Ale sounds better! lmao!

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At the 1 week mark, sanitize your third hop sack, place 1 cup Lucky Charms into it, tie the hop sack closed, then trim away excess material.

OK, so somebody tell me why the Lucky Charms would not introduce any unwanted bugs into the beer? Is it because of the sugar coating keeping them clean or the alcohol present by this time being able to kill anything on the cereal?

Good question, the sugar won't protect it only powdered (granulated) sugar is a dessicant, and there ain't enough alcohol in beer to kill bugs

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We just tried this at Black Bottle Brewery in Fort Collins Co. Wow. It was a tad sweet for our liking (we have never really been into sweet stouts) but it was pretty good! What a fun little brewery. They did a "Count Chocula" stout a while back and apparently bought all the cereal In the city. It pissed off one lady so they hand delivered a box for her kids. It was in the news (apparently a slow news day that day). Was a fun story to hear about.

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I dunno thats a better news story than most.  Local news is nothing but doom and gloom here which I why I don't watch it anymore

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the only cereal I truly enjoyed was Quisp.

I was a Quake enthusiast.  Liked Cap'n Crunch, too, but wow, it really tore up the roof of my mouth.

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I dunno thats a better news story than most.  Local news is nothing but doom and gloom here which I why I don't watch it anymore

I live in the city where a retired millionaire turned deputy accidently mistakened his gun for his tazor and killed an unarmed man during an arrest, here he had it all, and now he wont have a thing when its all said and done, oh btw, Liver Wurst Ale is brewed in my back yard, and ive been buying up all the liver wurst and no complaints so far, just a foul smell during boil
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Whoa Nelly - two and half oz of hops in two gallons of stout? That sounds like a highly hopped brew, doesn't it? I would assume that 1 oz (depending on the AA of the hops) would be suffiicent... No?

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Whoa Nelly - two and half oz of hops in two gallons of stout? That sounds like a highly hopped brew, doesn't it? I would assume that 1 oz (depending on the AA of the hops) would be suffiicent... No?

;)

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Whoa Nelly - two and half oz of hops in two gallons of stout? That sounds like a highly hopped brew, doesn't it? I would assume that 1 oz (depending on the AA of the hops) would be suffiicent... No?

 

I have a book with a bunch of 19th century stout recipes and they all have between 90 and 200 IBUs. Before I read that I thought excessively hopped beer was a relatively recent phenomenon.

 

Btw, The one with 200 IBUs was the original Russian Imperial stout, with 21.5 ounces of Goldings hops per 5 gallon batch. The author said this about it: "Full of alcohol and hops, not to survive the journey but because the Russian court liked it that way."

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Whoa Nelly - two and half oz of hops in two gallons of stout? That sounds like a highly hopped brew, doesn't it? I would assume that 1 oz (depending on the AA of the hops) would be suffiicent... No?

 

That's not 2 1/2oz that's 2 half ounce "Packets" totaling 1 oz. The "2" is the quantity and the "1/2" is the size.

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Wouldn't the Lucky Charms add next to no flavor to it?

 

Lucky charms has a few oats, but otherwise mostly sugar and corn syrup (http://services.housing.berkeley.edu/foodpro/dining/static/label.asp?locationNum=50&locationName=A-Z+Menu+Item+Listing&RecNumAndPort=032018*1). So I imagine the lucky charms adds mostly ABV.

 

The recipe looks good, but my sense is the Lucky Charms is mostly a conversation piece. 

 

Thoughts?

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Wouldn't the Lucky Charms add next to no flavor to it?

 

Lucky charms has a few oats, but otherwise mostly sugar and corn syrup (http://services.housing.berkeley.edu/foodpro/dining/static/label.asp?locationNum=50&locationName=A-Z+Menu+Item+Listing&RecNumAndPort=032018*1). So I imagine the lucky charms adds mostly ABV.

 

The recipe looks good, but my sense is the Lucky Charms is mostly a conversation piece. 

 

Thoughts?

The way it's added (after primary fermentation), the artificial flavors that are used should come through.  Its not different than adding flavor extract.

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Wouldn't the Lucky Charms add next to no flavor to it?

 

Lucky charms has a few oats, but otherwise mostly sugar and corn syrup (http://services.housing.berkeley.edu/foodpro/dining/static/label.asp?locationNum=50&locationName=A-Z+Menu+Item+Listing&RecNumAndPort=032018*1). So I imagine the lucky charms adds mostly ABV.

 

The recipe looks good, but my sense is the Lucky Charms is mostly a conversation piece. 

 

Thoughts?

 

It comes through really well, in my opinion. It's mostly in the finish, but it does contribute to the flavor in a very good way. I may seem biased, but I was also the one that converted the recipe from the original to our products so naturally I tested the recipe first before putting it up for sale. ;)

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Yeah, you can definitely use any cereal in this. The brewery uses the same base, but a different cereal each month. So the possibilities are endless. I'm thinking about a Peanut Butter Captain Crunch version...

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Yeah, you can definitely use any cereal in this. The brewery uses the same base, but a different cereal each month. So the possibilities are endless. I'm thinking about a Peanut Butter Captain Crunch version...

Applejax?

Fruitloops?

Special K

Raisin Bran

Cocoa Pebbles?

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The first one they did was Count Chocula. The one they sent me to try was the Sugar Cookie Toast Crunch. It was pretty damn good, imo. I was pleasantly surprised.

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The first one they did was Count Chocula. The one they sent me to try was the Sugar Cookie Toast Crunch. It was pretty damn good, imo. I was pleasantly surprised.

Golden Grahams?!

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I think brewing with Grape-Nuts would work out pretty well. I've heard of people doing it before with great results. I think a wheat beer base would work nicely. Grape-Nuts are basically just wheat, malted barley, salt, and yeast. The yeast has obviously been heated and is inactive so it should also work well as a nutrient. The cereal does have a pretty high salt content so you'd have to be careful how much you use. I would say no more than 10% of the recipe. Treat it as an adjunct. Anyway, now it has me thinking about Grape-Nuts beer. TO THE LAB!!! :ph34r:

mr-bean-lab-meme-generator-no-idea-what-

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Yeah, you can definitely use any cereal in this. The brewery uses the same base, but a different cereal each month. So the possibilities are endless. I'm thinking about a Peanut Butter Captain Crunch version...

Yum, yum. The peanut butter captain crunch was always my favorite of those type of cereals.

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re grape nuts...

 

I have used a grape nuts steep as a nutrient source when seeking to give yeast a pre-wort treat. it is full of vitamins, minerals, malt, and other goodness.  the thing to note is that when boiled you might get a clove-like off flavor...and that's why I only steep them. the yeast go nutso for it... but not as nutso as when I give them a piece of centrum vitamin and sacrificial yeast.  boil water, add yeast...cook for 10 mins...flame out. when it hits around 160 drop a hop sack with grape nuts in... .. or crush about an eighth of a vitamin and add to water. when cool I add it to wort.   yeast also seem to love raisins. 

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I tried to go to the page for this recipe and it has been removed. I purchased the hops and yeast for this(I already had the HME and LME), but can't remember the instructions. Can someone please post them or send them to me? I was going to try this with Reese's Puffs and see how it turned out. TIA.

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Here is Recipe and Instructions

 

RECIPE INCLUDES:
1 Can St. Patrick’s Irish Stout Brewing Extract

1 Packet Dry Brewing Yeast (Under lid of Brewing Extract)
1 Packet Safale US-04 Dry Yeast
2 BrewMax LME Softpack - Smooth
4 oz. Lactose Sugar
2 1/2 oz. Packet Northern Brewer Pellet Hops
3 Muslin Hop Sacks
2 Packets No-Rinse Cleanser

YOU PROVIDE:
1 cup Lucky Charms™ Cereal (or generic equivalent

 

  1. Place the contents of the Northern Brewer pellet hops packets into each hop sack (1 packet per hop sack. The 3rd hop sack will be used later.) and tie them closed, then trim away excess material.
  2. Remove the yeast packet (NOT needed for this recipe) from under the lid of the Brewing Extract can, then place the unopened can in hot tap water.
  3. Using the measuring cup, pour 6 cups of water into your clean 3-quart or larger pot. Bring water to a boil, then remove from heat. Open the pouches of LME and add to the hot water. Increase your heat to medium-high. Continue stirring constantly to keep the rising foam in check. If it begins to rise, pull the pan off the heat and lower the temperature slightly, continuing to stir until you hit the hot break which is where the foam has subsided and the solution is now safely boiling. Add your first hop sack, allow this mixture to simmer on LOW for 20 minutes, stirring constantly. After 20 minutes, add the 2nd hop sack and continue the low simmer for 10 more minutes. Then remove from heat. Slowly add the lactose sugar, stirring vigorously to avoid clumping.
  4. Open the can of Brewing Extract, and pour the contents into the hot mixture. Stir until thoroughly mixed. This mixture of unfermented beer is called wort.
  5. Fill keg with refrigerated tap water to the 4-quart mark on the back.
  6. Pour the wort into the keg, and then bring the volume of the keg to the 8.5-quart mark by adding more cold water. Stir vigorously with the spoon or whisk.
  7. Sprinkle ONLY the US-04 yeast packet (included in your recipe) into the keg and screw on the lid. Do not stir.
  8. Put your keg in a location with a consistent temperature between 59°and 75° F (15°-24°C), ideally about 68° F (20°C) and out of direct sunlight. Ferment for 14 days.
  9. At the 1 week mark, sanitize your third hop sack, place 1 cup Lucky Charms into it, tie the hop sack closed, then trim away excess material.
  10. Open the lid of the fermenter and toss in the hop sack, replace lid. Do not stir.
  11. After approximately 24 hours, you will be able to see the fermentation process happening by shining a flashlight into the keg. You'll see the yeast in action in the wort. The liquid will be opaque and milky, you will see bubbles rising in the liquid, and there will be bubbles on the surface.

Your fermentation will usually reach its peak in 2 to 5 days (this is also known as “high krausen”). You may see a layer of foam on top of the wort, and sediment will accumulate at the bottom of the fermenter. This is totally normal. Complete fermentation will take approximately 2 weeks.

After high krausen the foam and activity will subside and your batch will appear to be dormant. Your beer is still fermenting. The yeast is still at work slowly finishing the fermentation process.


 

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Old thread, but I am just catching up to this one.  I'll throw in that I've used Kashi 7-Grain Puff cereal to good effect in a saison.  I was really happy with the results.

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I started my brew of his on Friday and have it fermenting at around 63. This seems good for the Fermentis recommended S-04 range, but maybe a little lower than recipe calls for and a lot lower than milk stout calls for.

Will it taste different with the low temps using the S-04?

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No, it will taste different if you let it get too warm, though. S-04  seems to be one of those yeasts that the lower the ferment temp, the "cleaner" it ferments. Get it on the warm-end of its range and it turns a little fruity and ester-y and English. For some stouts, I could see going that route, but not this one.

 

  :)

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I would think a milk stout would stay away from those esters & other flavours you get from warmer fermentations.

 

Hmm...

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Yeah, the new Angry Bovine recipe calls for it at warmer end of range.

 

That's a typo and will be fixed.

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So, two unanswered questions regarding Lucky Charms;

 

1. Why doesn't adding non-sterile cereal infect the beer?

2. Is there any consensus on how long to condition?

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38 minutes ago, Bhob said:

So, two unanswered questions regarding Lucky Charms;

 

1. Why doesn't adding non-sterile cereal infect the beer?

2. Is there any consensus on how long to condition?

 

1. Because of the preservatives in the cereal. They will prevent any contamination. You'd think they'd stop yeast function, too, but not in the small amounts you're using.

2. The longer, the better. but I think about 6-8 weeks should peak the flavor.

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Going to brew this in the near future. Was reading the instructions to make sure i had all the ingreadiants when I noticed it calls for a hop "simmer" instead of a hop boil. Was curious what the reasoning is behind this?

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It just means a low rolling boil, which is what a simmer is.

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