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Justindhill

Carbonation Influx

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So I totally forgot to order carbonation drops for the last brew I ordered which was the Hop Head Red IPA. I had a few from my last batch and weighed one out at 3.3g. I used 16oz bottles to brew with and used 4.3g of granulated sugar which is about 2/3 less than I normally use with the drops at a rate of 1.5+/- equaling 4.95g+/- in weight. This batch of beer gives more than nice head :P . It is not over obundant but doing a solid obtuse pour of about 160 degrees does provide a lot of foam. This is not happening to all bottles though, I found one with a leaking gasket which poured out perfectly, about 90% of the other beers were really foamy and the other 10% as soon as I flipped the tops "POING!" the beer started over flowing right away. So I had a couple things going on which to me seems inconsistant as I measured out the granulated sugar to the T and used less than I normally do all around then when using the drops from Mr. Beer.

 

Is there a difference between using the Mr. Beer solidified glucose versus granulated glucose for carbonation?

 

Please note: There has to be some science involved in this so a dumb generic answer will not suffice as there is a difference in how the yeast will handle seperated glucose particles compared to a solidified glucose block that the yeast has to work through.

 

Indulge me :)

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There is no difference at all because the solid sugar dissolves before the yeast has a chance to even start "working through" it. Also, our carb drops and table sugar are sucrose, not glucose.

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There is no difference at all because the solid sugar dissolves before the yeast has a chance to even start "working through" it. Also, our carb drops and table sugar are sucrose, not glucose.

Thanks JoshR, I was hoping you would chime in. What would you base the difference on?

 

*Edit - Sucrose should have been formally applied to my OP.

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The only difference between the carb drops and regular sugar is ease of use. The carb drops are pre-measured for our bottles making them easier to use. With that said, many people prefer table sugar because they can get the exact amount of carbonation based on what beer they are brewing using a priming calculator. But as far as how the yeast consumes the sugar, there is no difference between the 2.

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That being said, what would cause the influx in foam when I digitally measured the sugar to exactly 4.3g per 16oz bottle? By weight that is less than I use when I use the drops for the same 16oz bottles. Only thing I can think of is the calibration might have been off but I tested that today and it was solid. Something has to be different. I would try to duplicate it but the Hop Head Red IPA is not one of my favorite brews. I will try granulated sugar with half my next batch and half with the drops and see how that goes. Stay tuned!

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Temperature is a big factor. How cold was each bottle? What about the glass, were they exactly the same temperature? Small amounts of residue in the glass could also act as "nuclei" for carbonation.. Were all the bottles opened at the same time? A few days difference can mean a lot more carbonation as the CO2  dissolves into the liquid under pressure. These are just a few factors which came to mind, and i am sure there are others. One passing note - Why so exact in measuring your priming sugar? IMHO, it is not necessary. A few tenths of a gram will really not make a difference. The volume of gas produced by the yeast for a given amount of sugar is approximate, due to environmental variables. Lastly, batch priming, is a great way to ensure that the bottles are evenly primed with sugar. Again, just my opinion, YMMV. 

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Just curious, what vol (volumes) are you shooting for? i.e. I carb my APA @ 2.5vols which is 128.92g of table sugar for 5 gallons in the bottling bucket.

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