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MichaelL

Another first bottle bomb

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Just walked past the spare bedroom which I've been using to bottle condition my Rose's Rambling Red and smelled the unmistakable aroma of beer.  Upon checking the room, I found that the bottom of one of my bottles had given out and broken off (nearly intact).  The towels under the bottles were soaked with beer  :(  (which of course is their purpose on the chance that something like this happens).  I've been using these 22-oz glass bottles for over two years in my MrBeer brewing, but they are far older than that:  they were purchased at my local brew-on-premises and some of them date back over ten years of active use.  Looks like the stretch of unusually hot weather has taken its toll, as I'm sure that room was over 80 degrees on at least two days.  Silly me, I thought I'd already re-located the bottles to my much-cooler basement.

 

Lesson learned.

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Unless you dropped them, 10 years of use would not "stress" the bottles to become brittle.

There are 1000 year old stained glass windows that warm up and cool everyday.

 

If you're cleaning your bottles with scalding hot water, make sure that you are not rapidly cooling them.  This can cause stress fractures.

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That is exactly how I had glass bottles break many years ago, cracked right in a ring around the base. I had over primed them.

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Two threads going about bottle bombs. Guess I've just been lucky. They always say it's better to be lucky than good.

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Vakko, I wasn't attempting to blame "stress" for the bottle failure, just noting that these were "veteran" bottles that have seen a lot of beer over the years.  I expect that these bottles will continue to render good service for many years to come.   Also, I don't clean with "scalding" hot water as a general rule, nor do I "rapidly" cool them.  Simple warm tap water with a bottle brush and drip dry as a rule.

 

No overpriming here, either, Nick.  One MrBeer carb drop for a 22-oz bottle.  Just one of those things, I guess, and I mostly blame my failure to move the bottles to a cooler part of the house during the recent unseasonably warm weather.

 

What makes it worse is that it's just four weeks in the bottle this week and I hadn't even had a chance to taste the brew yet!  I have since enjoyed one, and it was quite good indeed.  

 

Finally, I edited the original post to reflect the fact that I've been using these bottles for two years of MrBeer brewing, not just one

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New rule: if you start a bottle bomb thread, you must post a picture of it!

That way we can see the awesome carnage of spewed glass and beer everywhere! Yay! Bonus man points if you can get a snapshot of your wife's face when she sees the curtains, ceilings, cabinets, etc.

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As a bottle bomb victim, I wonder if Vakko is correct and my bombs were caused by my use of our "insta-hot" water dispenser, which dispenses water at about 180 from a reservoir under the kitchen sink. I use it to rinse out trub and follow with tap water. Not sure if other bottle bomb victims have a similar problem.

 

 

EDIT: while writing this post, the radio tuned to the oldies station started playing "You Dropped A Bomb on Me". Maybe the Gap Band were home brewers.

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 Just one of those things, I guess, and I mostly blame my failure to move the bottles to a cooler part of the house during the recent unseasonably warm weather.

 

 

this room gets 80+ during the "dog days" no bottle bombs. The only bombs I've had I think were caused by flaws in the glass.

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Glass bottles due have a maximum number of uses recommended.  Unlike a stain glass window that has multiple pieces to expanded and contract connected with malleable lead joints a bottle will eventually weaken being one piece.  Beer/ wine bottles are made from the cheapest low temperature glass there is as well.  It's for this reason I only use custom made bottles made from melted down medieval stain glass, the holier the better.

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I avoided a bottle bomb, luckily. I was messing with the beer I bottled, putting on labels (see other thread) and I noticed there was a little bit of beer leaking out from around the cap of the aluminum bottle I used to get the last bit of my brew bottled. Oh boy. I took it to the sink and opened it up, and got a gusher. About 2/3 of the beer either shot out or foamed out (it seemed like it foamed over for 5 minutes, probably closer to 30 seconds) and I totally lost 16 ounces of beer, as the gushing/foaming action stirred up all the trub on the bottom.

 

I learned a lesson from this - first, this showed me that a whole carbonation tablet is for 16 ounces, not 12, as I used a whole tab on my 12-oz bottles (they are all fine, BTW, just over-carbed a bit but no bombs) but I used a whole tab plus about 1/3 of one for the 16 oz metal bottle. Add that to the fact that the 16-ouncer got the last bit of beer from the LBK, which means it had the most stirred up trub/yeast, and yeah - pretty sure if this had been a glass bottle, it would have burst.

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Before I was using the carb drops, I found easy to get distracted and put 3 scoops into one bottle and 1 in another.  Bottle bombs are generally from stuck/stalled fermentations that get reactivated with the priming sugar.  Not from too much priming sugar.

You could fill a bottle halfway up with trub but if you added the correct amount of priming sugar, you would not have an explosion.

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I am only making a SWAG, but it seems the 12 oz bottles with a whole carb drop are fine, they don't gush when opened or anything. The aluminum bottle had too much priming sugar AND the extra trub. Again, a SWAG, but that's why I think it happened.

 

That and maybe re-capping the used bottle wasn't a good idea in the end, it just seems funny that it took over 3 weeks for it to happen, one way or the other.

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Still not sure why that one bottle went pop while the others are doing fine.  It wasn't the last bottle with (perhaps, although I do my best) extra trub.  In fact, it was one of my newer bottles that hadn't been through as many batches as some of the others.  Must have been subjected to stress at some time, I guess.  It's possible that my wife washed it with very hot water at some point.  Anyway, the rest are doing fine and I'm looking forward to enjoying the beer inside.

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Again, trub/yeast amount has no bearing on the amount of CO2 produced.  The fact that a bottle will explode is either a faulty bottle that cannot hold pressure or too much dissolved sugar.  

 

You can put 1 carb drop in your bottle and 2 packets of yeast and the result would be the same if you used 1 packet or none at all.

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I'll admit - I don't know exactly how much priming sugar went into the aluminum bottle - I put one drop and then the dust that was at the bottom of the bag.

 

  :o

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Unless they are a danger do not chuck the bottle bombs (presumed).

 

I opened another of my swollen PET Dortmunder Export bottles tonight - after filling the glass with the foam cylinder exuding like live toothpaste, waiting for the foam to clear a bit  the beer was lovely and smooth and malty delicious.

 

I am wondering if I really should chuck the bottles after that stress or reuse them.

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I am wondering if I really should chuck the bottles after that stress or reuse them.

if the bottom didn't deform (i.e. won't stand up). I'd re-use them

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The 1/2L bottles are really bad at deforming... but I've found that a quick dip in boiling water will get them up to the task of reshaping.

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These are 750 s and even the 1L is a bit out of shape. But thanks, I will try the hot water trick.

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Well, I know this thread had a few months on it, but I had my first bottle bomb in the last few days.  I bottled my Staggerback Stout on August 29th and when I decided to sample another, I smelled the aroma of a freshly opened beer... To my dismay one of the bottle lay in numerous pieces in the case.  The bottle literally disintegrated.  I contribute this explosion on a bad bottle and probable over carbonation when I batch primed (used 9 tsp cane sugar for 2.13 gallons). 

 

When I sampled the first one about a week ago, it was a gusher.  The beer, what was left, tasted GREAT.  But, because of my own ignorance, I opened the bottle when it was about 65 degrees.  I chilled two after that and it helped, but only slightly.  So far none of the other bottles have committed suicide, but I will definitely open them over the sink from now on. 

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9 tsp is not the problem, it's fine. Infection?

 

I don't think there's an infection, the beer tastes great... When I chilled the second beer (only for 1 day), we opened it very slowly allowing it to release CO2 slowly and it constantly overflowed the bottle even after the cap was off, but did not create a gusher.  It did the same thing in the glass.  We slow poured and the beer tasted really good, although I thought it still had a slight green taste to it.  My thoughts were maybe I should have let it ferment a few more days???  I have two more in the fridge now that I plan to chill for the full three days and see what happens. 

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It's possible that it wasn't done fermenting, don't know your OG and FG readings.  Infections don't always have an off taste, and gushing out of the bottle is consistent with an infection.

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It's possible that it wasn't done fermenting, don't know your OG and FG readings.  Infections don't always have an off taste, and gushing out of the bottle is consistent with an infection.

Sounds more like an infection than anything else. The OG was 1.074 and FG was 1.020 after 18 days of fermenting. Since it came out with an ABV of 7.09, I only took one reading.

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1.020 is normal for a Stout in my experience.

 

Was interesting is that my Stout that I made most recently, while it doesn't do as yours does, it does create a ton of foam in the glass and takes several pours to get the glass full.

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1.020 is normal for a Stout in my experience.

 

Was interesting is that my Stout that I made most recently, while it doesn't do as yours does, it does create a ton of foam in the glass and takes several pours to get the glass full.

I'll let you know in a couple of days what it's like after 3 days in the fridge.

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After I bottle I always put my new bottles to condition in rubber maid tubs this is for just in case.

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1.020 is normal for a Stout in my experience.

 

Was interesting is that my Stout that I made most recently, while it doesn't do as yours does, it does create a ton of foam in the glass and takes several pours to get the glass full.

Three days in the fridge and opening it very, very slowly, foam oozes out of the bottle, but does not gush. Huge amount of foam on the beer when pouring it very slowly down the side of the glass. Beer tastes so good, I am going to brew another Staggerback when I get the remaining ingredients. This time, I may let it ferment for an extra week and compare it to this batch to see if it eliminates some of the foaming.

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Sounds odd to me; definitely seems like it might be an infection.  I opened the third 22-oz bottle of my latest Staggerback last night, and all three have been perfect as regards carbonation and foam/head.  I've had the foam overflow problem from time to time, but almost never a true gusher; what's interesting, in light of RickBeer's comment, is that I also had the problem with a Stout:  MrB's Shillelagh Stout.  That one, I'm almost certain, was due to an infection caused by indifferent sanitation on one of the bottles.  It's just odd that so many of us have had this issue with Stouts.

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Sounds odd to me; definitely seems like it might be an infection.  I opened the third 22-oz bottle of my latest Staggerback last night, and all three have been perfect as regards carbonation and foam/head.  I've had the foam overflow problem from time to time, but almost never a true gusher; what's interesting, in light of RickBeer's comment, is that I also had the problem with a Stout:  MrB's Shillelagh Stout.  That one, I'm almost certain, was due to an infection caused by indifferent sanitation on one of the bottles.  It's just odd that so many of us have had this issue with Stouts.

 

I've only had the one gusher and that was my own stupidity for opening it when it was about 65 degrees and had not been chilled at all.  Those that I have chilled for 3 days basically oozed out of the bottle after opening slowly.  i just received the rest of the ingredients for another batch and I'm going to try it again...  So, we'll see if I can do better on my second batch of Staggerback...

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Have uad multiple bottle bombs. 6 batches bout 4 bombs. Why idk. And it happens in various temps.

And its no fun thing when you just got home from over seas. But it was a very comical moment.

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I've only had 2 bottle bombs in 22 batches and it was from the same batch that wasn't 100% fermented but I bottled anyway.  Yet only 2 out of 40 bottles popped from that batch and the rest are good now.

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the only bottle bombs i get is when i forget i put one in the freezer for a quick chill, now i've had many flip tops blow off when i pop em open, the last one that did that flew off,  ricocheted off the cabinet door and smacked me in my nose! u never nose what might happen when u think ur a nose-it-all at bottle opening.... 

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This thread must have jinxed me! After we went to bed last night we heard a crashing sound in the basement. Told my wife something must have fell. Went down this morning and found the lid from a cooler I keep beer in had been blown off. There was beer splattered on the floor, walls, and ceiling. It was a 1 L PET bottle of Winter Dark that had been bottled 6 weeks ago and it had cracked across the bottom of the bottle. This was a bottle that came with the original kit 5 or so years ago. I'm wondering if the plastic gets brittle with age? I should probably get rid of all my old plastic bottles.

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Plastic does get brittle with age but UV light usually is one of the prime causes and I doubt that is the case here

 

It could be the caps. Sometimes they will stretch if used to many times. Once a lot of pressure builds up, they can blow. I usually replace my caps after about 8-10 uses.

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This thread must have jinxed me! After we went to bed last night we heard a crashing sound in the basement. Told my wife something must have fell. Went down this morning and found the lid from a cooler I keep beer in had been blown off. There was beer splattered on the floor, walls, and ceiling. It was a 1 L PET bottle of Winter Dark that had been bottled 6 weeks ago and it had cracked across the bottom of the bottle. This was a bottle that came with the original kit 5 or so years ago. I'm wondering if the plastic gets brittle with age? I should probably get rid of all my old plastic bottles.

 

It could be the caps. Sometimes they will stretch if used to many times. Once a lot of pressure builds up, they can blow. I usually replace my caps after about 8-10 uses.

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It could be the caps. Sometimes they will stretch if used to many times. Once a lot of pressure builds up, they can blow. I usually replace my caps after about 8-10 uses.

 

Then why did the bottom of the bottle split open?

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Then why did the bottom of the bottle split open?

 

Yeah, that could be a result of old bottles.

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Cripes, I just looked at my profile. I joined here 7 years ago. I guess it's time to retire the original bottles. 

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