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can a week more conditioning really make a diffrence

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could not wait another week, snuck a couple of bottles of my canadian blonde tonight, it was well, greeeeeen. my question is will a week more conditioning really make that much diffrence to the beer or can i write off this batch? it was in the keg for 3 3/4 weeks and in the bottle for another 3 weeks. it was in the keg longer because i inadvertedly slowed the fermentation process by chilling it to much at the start. 

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I think the rule of thumb is 3 weeks, but it depends. Generally speaking, the bigger the beer the more it should get, but even that isn't always true. For example, a lighter beer like the Canadian blonde will show flaws more than not-as-light one. I just bottled a bitter a week ago, and it's drinkable now. (Note: "drinkable" doesn't necessarily mean it's going to win any awards.) I bottled a Belgian pale ale about a month ago and it could use some more conditioning, although the flavors in that one might be caused by the minerals in my tap water and I'm not going to get into all that. I bottled a barleywine recently that I'm scared to open before November. Literally.  

 

Anywho, no don't dump it. Wait a week or two and try another one. If the off flavors haven't started to dissipate, there could be something wrong besides lack of conditioning time. As long as it's more or less drinkable I would save it, maybe squeeze an orange in it or something to mask whatever the problem is. If it's not drinkable I'd still save it and drink it straight while flagellating myself and listening to Bruno Mars' "Happy" on a loop as punishment for my failure. I'm hardcore like that.

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I think the rule of thumb is 3 weeks, but it depends. Generally speaking, the bigger the beer the more it should get, but even that isn't always true. For example, a lighter beer like the Canadian blonde will show flaws more than not-as-light one. I just bottled a bitter a week ago, and it's drinkable now. (Note: "drinkable" doesn't necessarily mean it's going to win any awards.) I bottled a Belgian pale ale about a month ago and it could use some more conditioning, although the flavors in that one might be caused by the minerals in my tap water and I'm not going to get into all that. I bottled a barleywine recently that I'm scared to open before November. Literally.  

 

Anywho, no don't dump it. Wait a week or two and try another one. If the off flavors haven't started to dissipate, there could be something wrong besides lack of conditioning time. As long as it's more or less drinkable I would save it, maybe squeeze an orange in it or something to mask whatever the problem is. If it's not drinkable I'd still save it and drink it straight while flagellating myself and listening to Bruno Mars' "Happy" on a loop as punishment for my failure. I'm hardcore like that.

4 weeks is recommended.

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4 weeks is recommended.

 

Sure, why not? Sometimes 3 weeks is recommended, sometimes 2 weeks is recommended, sometimes 6 months is recommended...Throw in 4 weeks, the more the merrier!

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I think the rule of thumb is 3 weeks, but it depends. Generally speaking, the bigger the beer the more it should get, but even that isn't always true. For example, a lighter beer like the Canadian blonde will show flaws more than not-as-light one. I just bottled a bitter a week ago, and it's drinkable now. (Note: "drinkable" doesn't necessarily mean it's going to win any awards.) I bottled a Belgian pale ale about a month ago and it could use some more conditioning, although the flavors in that one might be caused by the minerals in my tap water and I'm not going to get into all that. I bottled a barleywine recently that I'm scared to open before November. Literally.  

 

Anywho, no don't dump it. Wait a week or two and try another one. If the off flavors haven't started to dissipate, there could be something wrong besides lack of conditioning time. As long as it's more or less drinkable I would save it, maybe squeeze an orange in it or something to mask whatever the problem is. If it's not drinkable I'd still save it and drink it straight while flagellating myself and listening to Bruno Mars' "Happy" on a loop as punishment for my failure. I'm hardcore like that.

 

Also, a beer that isn't optimal but literally not worth a drain-pour can be used in cooking. Heck, I used to buy a 12-pack of cheap beer to use in my water-bath when making BBQ and/or ribs in my smoker.

 

 :)

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3-4 is pretty clear. 3 weeks fermenting, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher. May take 6.

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Yes! Condition 4 weeks at least. I've personally noticed (and read in here many times) that anything with an OG more than 1.040 is really better after 5 or 6 weeks conditioning. Particularly with the craft series refills, they were good at 4 weeks, but noticably better after 5 and 6 weeks.

I also had a batch of Grand Czech Boh that just didn't taste great after 4 weeks. I suspect it got a little too warm during the fermentation so it had a slight sour/apple flavour. I let the remaining bottles condition to 6 weeks and they were noticably better.

Don't rush! Patience is rewarded when brewing beer.

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Sure, why not? Sometimes 3 weeks is recommended, sometimes 2 weeks is recommended, sometimes 6 months is recommended...Throw in 4 weeks, the more the merrier!

It's the rule of thumb.

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As the others have said, don't dump the beer!  In most cases, the longer the better is the rule for bottle-conditioning.  4 weeks is really the minimum for a decent brew.  Patience is the cardinal virtue in this hobby.

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thanks, wasn't going to dump down the drain, would have drank it anyway. just wasn't sure a week could make that much of a difrence. will let it condition out for a few more weeks and then compare notes against the three week old stuff

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Don't drink it unless you need the bottles.  I would check it in a month.

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re-read your rightway to brew Rick, was basically what i have done, 3 and 3/4 weeks( just because of time restraints) in the fermenter due to stalling the fermentation process by overcooling the LBK  in the first couple days (must really pick up the stick on thermometer that mr beer sells) bottled and let carbonate for three weeks, got gready and sampled a couple of bottles and was disapointed. (i just found it really hard to belive that 7 extra days would take away that much"greeen") but i think i will follow Vakko's advice and let sit another month.

 

cheers

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If they were as "green" tasting as you describe, let them sit a full month to six weeks before you try one again. Just asking - but are you conditioning at room temperature? 

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yeah at room temp, have them sitting in a closet in a open cooler oot of the sunlight

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I figure after the 4 week initial maturing I open 1 a month anyway just to see. But I have a lot of bottles so I can afford to do that.

The flavor will be changing every month but what is best is a personal preference, you may find you like some with less time and some with more. Then you can wait more or less next time you make that beer.

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3-4 is pretty clear. 3 weeks fermenting, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher. May take 6.

 

 

It's the rule of thumb.

 

If you guys want to say 4 weeks that's super, but a quick Google search will show that plenty of people say otherwise. I'm talking about the time it takes for a beer to taste acceptable, not to reach its peak of flavor. I generally say 3 weeks in the bottle, but not always. There's no single correct answer to this, and it depends on the type of beer. I have a case (minus 3 or 4 beers) of 4.4% bitter sitting in the kitchen that's carbonated and surprisingly clear, but slightly green, after a week in the bottle. I made this beer because I was out of homebrew and wanted something with a "quick" turnaround time of 4-5 weeks. Is it my most favoritest beer ever? Nope. Is it decent? Yep. It could use a little more head, but then again couldn't we all?  :D. I'll start giving it to other people after 2 or 3 weeks. That's slow compared to some of the quick-turnaround beers people talk about on other homebrewing forums. It isn't necessary to wait 7 or more weeks for every single batch of homebrew you make if you don't want to. Sometimes I'll spend all day cooking a meal, sometimes I make a sandwich. Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel, but he also drew sketches. You get my point. Anyway if you think I'm wrong, please open your Brewing Bibles to the oft-quoted Book of St. Palmer, Chapter 11, Verse 6.  :P

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When I first made MrBeer using the CAL and Canadian Blonde, I only waited the week to have it carbonate, they were drinkable and tasted better because I MADE THEM!!!

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If you guys want to say 4 weeks that's super, but a quick Google search will show that plenty of people say otherwise. I'm talking about the time it takes for a beer to taste acceptable, not to reach its peak of flavor. I generally say 3 weeks in the bottle, but not always. There's no single correct answer to this, and it depends on the type of beer. I have a case (minus 3 or 4 beers) of 4.4% bitter sitting in the kitchen that's carbonated and surprisingly clear, but slightly green, after a week in the bottle. I made this beer because I was out of homebrew and wanted something with a "quick" turnaround time of 4-5 weeks. Is it my most favoritest beer ever? Nope. Is it decent? Yep. It could use a little more head, but then again couldn't we all?  :D. I'll start giving it to other people after 2 or 3 weeks. That's slow compared to some of the quick-turnaround beers people talk about on other homebrewing forums. It isn't necessary to wait 7 or more weeks for every single batch of homebrew you make if you don't want to. Sometimes I'll spend all day cooking a meal, sometimes I make a sandwich. Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel, but he also drew sketches. You get my point. Anyway if you think I'm wrong, please open your Brewing Bibles to the oft-quoted Book of St. Palmer, Chapter 11, Verse 6.  :P

 

 

3 - 4 is what we recommend in an effort to keep people from quitting the hobby because they do 7-14 and find that they made crappy tasting beer.  As one of my signature items says, there is no right way to brew beer.  But if a noob does 7-14 they are much more likely to quit the hobby.

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3 - 4 is what we recommend in an effort to keep people from quitting the hobby because they do 7-14 and find that they made crappy tasting beer. As one of my signature items says, there is no right way to brew beer. But if a noob does 7-14 they are much more likely to quit the hobby.

That's a good point. Sometimes I forget the target audience and get a little ahead of myself. I think it's kind of a balancing act between making something worth drinking and doing it in a reasonable amount of time. Plus it seems like Mr. Beer markets its stuff to appeal to perspective new brewers who aren't "craft" beer drinkers yet. They're not going to make a beginner kit that has a fast turnaround time, like a dry stout or a bitter for example. Personally, when I started brewing I wouldn't have been thrilled at the prospect of waiting 2 months for a $20 case of lite beer.

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Happy Memorial day everybody. Thanks to those that have given the ultimate sacrifice so we may brew beer and every other freedom & liberty they have afforded us.

 

On this subject, I will guarantee that the OPs batch of brew will be better each and every week he lets it sit and conditions. There is a right way to brew beer and we are all on that mission to do so. One batch turns out perfect and the next batch is so-so. This is how we compare our own brewing. We set a standard and then proceed to match or better that standard. I brew my batches of homebrew the right way, my way...so let it be written so let it be said.

 

Your batch will improve with aging thru conditioning even if ever so slightly. It will not get any worse unless you really screwed the pooch in bottling it. Stay with it and keep reaching for that perfect standard of brewing. I have reached it and I am still perfecting it even if i do it the right way every time.

 

Salud My Friends 

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Make sure your bottles are in a room with above 70 degrees ambient temp. 

 

To your question of "does a week make a difference?" How much work can you do in a week? I bet it's a considerable amount, same goes for the wee beasties working on the consumable material in your bottles. The longer you give them time the more the character of your beer will mature. For most styles this is optimal.

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Stay with it and keep reaching for that perfect standard of brewing. I have reached it and I am still perfecting it even if i do it the right way every time.

 

Salud My Friends 

 

 

Make sure your bottles are in a room with above 70 degrees ambient temp. 

 

The longer you give them time the more the character of your beer will mature. For most styles this optimal.

 

I probably shouldn't disagree with someone who has reached a perfect standard of brewing, but not all beers benefit from extended aging. In fact, it has been said that certain beers will reach their peak of flavor early, then they will begin to lose it. Typically this means that hop flavor and aroma will begin to dissipate, like in some IPAs for example.

 

Now, I said "it has been said" because keeping beer around for too long has never been an issue for me so I cannot vouch for this.  But I think it's safe to say that you do not want to store your case of CAL down in the cellar with your Chateau Le (insert name of fancy wine here) so that you can break it out when your newborn graduates from college. What I can vouch for is the fact that beer reaches a flavor plateau at some point. With that bitter I mentioned it will be 3 weeks in the bottle, tops. I'm drinking one now as I type this. I figure most of your standard Mr. Beer kits will peak in a month or less. A recent biere de garde (actually a saison... don't tell anybody) peaked around 1.5 months or so.

 

I wonder if John Palmer has any more insight into the subject. Well, what do you know...he does!  :)

 

"Conditioning times. How long you choose to condition will depend on your recipe and your preference. Different beer styles benefit from different amounts of conditioning time. Generally, the higher the original gravity, the longer the conditioning time needed for a beer to reach peak flavor. Small beers such as 1.035 O.G. (8.76 °P) pale ales will need less than two weeks. Stronger, more complex ales such as porters may require a month or more. Very strong beers such as Doppelbocks and barleywines can take six months to a year before they condition to their peak flavor."  -http://www.morebeer.com/articles/conditioning

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If you guys want to say 4 weeks that's super, but a quick Google search will show that plenty of people say otherwise. I'm talking about the time it takes for a beer to taste acceptable, not to reach its peak of flavor. I generally say 3 weeks in the bottle, but not always. There's no single correct answer to this, and it depends on the type of beer. I have a case (minus 3 or 4 beers) of 4.4% bitter sitting in the kitchen that's carbonated and surprisingly clear, but slightly green, after a week in the bottle. I made this beer because I was out of homebrew and wanted something with a "quick" turnaround time of 4-5 weeks. Is it my most favoritest beer ever? Nope. Is it decent? Yep. It could use a little more head, but then again couldn't we all?  :D. I'll start giving it to other people after 2 or 3 weeks. That's slow compared to some of the quick-turnaround beers people talk about on other homebrewing forums. It isn't necessary to wait 7 or more weeks for every single batch of homebrew you make if you don't want to. Sometimes I'll spend all day cooking a meal, sometimes I make a sandwich. Michelangelo painted the Sistine Chapel, but he also drew sketches. You get my point. Anyway if you think I'm wrong, please open your Brewing Bibles to the oft-quoted Book of St. Palmer, Chapter 11, Verse 6.  :P

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/rule+of+thumb

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Not just one week extra, but several as the beer will keep improving.  I made my second batch of Cerveza back in January.  I hadn't been impressed with the first batch and thought it was weak.  For the second batch I added a lb of Pilsen DME and some hops.  I let it ferment for three weeks and then condition for five.  When I sampled a bottle it still wasn't impressive.  The flavor was better than the first batch, but it was still thin.  I sat the stuff aside and forgot about it as I had plenty of other beer to drink - my pipeline is deep and varied.  Fast forward to where the Cerveza had conditioned for four months and I decided to try another bottle to see if it had improved.  Oh it had improved alright.  This stuff was outstanding, very flavorful with an excellent mouth feel.  It could become one of my favorites.  What a difference some conditioning made.  Now the problem is that I don't know what the optimal conditioning time is as I ignored it between five weeks and four months, but somewhere in between is the perfect time for this beer to show its stuff. Since I took advantage of the Memorial Day Sale and stocked up I'll be making another batch of this and sampling a bottle every week to determine when it hits its prime.  

 

I realize this is a long post and answer to your question whether one week will make a difference, but I wanted to relay my experience with how a so so beer can become a great beer with patience and conditioning.  Don't give up on your green beer.  Set it aside and let it condition for a few more weeks.  It might just surprise you.

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My basement storage goes between 62 and 65 with AC on or 65-70 with heating on, so sometimes takes a while to condition and carb.

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Quote:

"Conditioning times. How long you choose to condition will depend on your recipe and your preference. Different beer styles benefit from different amounts of conditioning time. Generally, the higher the original gravity, the longer the conditioning time needed for a beer to reach peak flavor. Small beers such as 1.035 O.G. (8.76 °P) pale ales will need less than two weeks. Stronger, more complex ales such as porters may require a month or more. Very strong beers such as Doppelbocks and barleywines can take six months to a year before they condition to their peak flavor."  -http://www.morebeer....es/conditioning

 

This must be why Mr. Beer can feel OK when they state the 2 week conditioning for the basic kit which only uses 3 <-> 3.7% beers.

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Yes, two weeks is not enough in the bottle, I do four weeks before I taste any batch (unless the recipe suggests more).  On a side note, once batch is in the keg I wait three weeks until I bottle.  Previously I had some batches with a high-level of head.  Waiting three weeks in the keg has solved the issue and has enhanced the flavor.  

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Quote:

"Conditioning times. How long you choose to condition will depend on your recipe and your preference. Different beer styles benefit from different amounts of conditioning time. Generally, the higher the original gravity, the longer the conditioning time needed for a beer to reach peak flavor. Small beers such as 1.035 O.G. (8.76 °P) pale ales will need less than two weeks. Stronger, more complex ales such as porters may require a month or more. Very strong beers such as Doppelbocks and barleywines can take six months to a year before they condition to their peak flavor."  -http://www.morebeer....es/conditioning

 

This must be why Mr. Beer can feel OK when they state the 2 week conditioning for the basic kit which only uses 3 <-> 3.7% beers.

 

I think you're right. They're probably referring to the time it takes for the beer to be drinkable, even though it might still be a bit green. It will continue to improve for a while after that, but it shouldn't taste like complete ass (I know, y'all will defer to my expertise in that area, hahaha) after 2 or 3 weeks. The problem is that things like CAL, even though they might be low in alcohol, are not necessarily the best candidates for a quick turnaround beer because they don't have any flavor components that mask those green flavors.

I think some people rush their first batch made from a light, under-hopped extract kit, then when they're unhappy with the results they assume that every beer they brew needs to condition for a month before it's drinkable. If you have some brewing experience under your belt and have never done so, consider trying to brew a beer with a fast turnaround time. I'm not talking about something like a "From grain to glass in 7 days" type of thing, but more like a nice hoppy IPA or Irish dry stout that you will enjoy after 4-5 weeks tops. Everyone always talks about upping their brewing game by making bigger beers that require more aging, but I think it's also fun to go in the other direction and know that if you want to, you can come up with a tasty batch of homebrew in a hurry, relatively speaking. 

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Hefeweizen is supposedly one of the "drink it early" styles, but I find my 4 week old hefe bottles to be much more enjoyable than my 2 week old bottles of hefe.

 

It's true that hop aroma in IPAs and beers with a lot of drying hopping will fade in the bottle. That would be included in some the styles for which it's not optimal. 

While you're suppose to drink a wheat young, I think 2 weeks is waaay too young. I am not adverse to drinking a 3 week old one when I'm doing lawn work.  However, like you, I  prefer them @ 4 weeks.  I have not tried a wheat @ 12 weeks though. It's flavor might fade just like the hops will in an IPA.(I'm not implying an IPA will loose it's hop flavor in 12 weeks) The whole 4 week thing is a minimum time anyway. Truth to tell, most of my brews still taste a little green(but drinkable) at 4 weeks.

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In my experience of about 25 batches, definitely additional weeks can help. Not always, but usually.

 

Examples:

Chug a Lugger at 3-4 weeks was OK, pedestrian. Nothing special. At 2 months it was an amazing malt bomb. Friends I shared it with at that point loved it and demanded more.

Dampfbier: so-so at 3-4 weeks, more character and complex flavor at 6-8 weeks.

 

A few beers I have had seem to worsen with age, e.g., seasonal Nut Brown ale lost that hoppy edge I loved, but that is typical of hoppy beers. 

 

Experiment. Let them site for a while. You will usually be rewarded.

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3-4 is pretty clear. 3 weeks fermenting, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher. May take 6.

So one week from today will be 3 weeks fermenting on my first brew.  I plan to wait until then to bottle.  The basement (generally around 65) will be too cold so I should move it to a warmer part of the house?  Am I understanding this correct, I actually want the beer somewhere warmer once it goes in the bottle?  

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So one week from today will be 3 weeks fermenting on my first brew.  I plan to wait until then to bottle.  The basement (generally around 65) will be too cold so I should move it to a warmer part of the house?  Am I understanding this correct, I actually want the beer somewhere warmer once it goes in the bottle?  

 

Yes. 70-75 degrees works best. I still carbonate at 65 only because our brew room is set at that temp. It takes a bit longer, but the job still gets done.

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Yes. 70-75 degrees works best. I still carbonate at 65 only because our brew room is set at that temp. It takes a bit longer, but the job still gets done.

Ok thanks, my one addendum to that, we live in a 3 story townhouse that is a corner unit which gets a lot of sun.  During the day no one is home so we turn off the air.  With the summer weather starting to pop up, I am finding it gets to about 75 in the house during the day.  Because of this, would that be too warm?  The only part of the house that stays consistently under 70 is the basement where the LBK is.  During the day, when its warmer it still only gets to about 68-69 down there.  Should I in fact consider leaving it there and just being patient rather than risking a part of the house I know to be warmer but could end up too warm?  I don't want to mess up my beer, but I certainly cannot afford to just waste electricity by running the air all day when no one is there.  

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Ok thanks, my one addendum to that, we live in a 3 story townhouse that is a corner unit which gets a lot of sun.  During the day no one is home so we turn off the air.  With the summer weather starting to pop up, I am finding it gets to about 75 in the house during the day.  Because of this, would that be too warm?  The only part of the house that stays consistently under 70 is the basement where the LBK is.  During the day, when its warmer it still only gets to about 68-69 down there.  Should I in fact consider leaving it there and just being patient rather than risking a part of the house I know to be warmer but could end up too warm?  I don't want to mess up my beer, but I certainly cannot afford to just waste electricity by running the air all day when no one is there.

 

Keep it in the basement. It would probably be fine at 75, but if it gets higher it could cause explosions (this is rare, but it does happen), and anything higher than 80 could kill the yeast causing undercarbonation. And it sounds like the basement will keep more consistent temperatures since the rest of the house gets the daily sunlight so the basement is your best option.

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If you like lighter beer, you can get drinkable from CAL in that time though. I did on my first ones (with booster) even my friends liked it.  You have to give starting brewers quick success to encourage them.

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thanks for all the input, i'm gonna let the brew condition for at least a few more weeks, even though it was green it was still better then my first batch so i'm not really complaining and it's not like i mind waiting, there are all sorts of new craft beers at the liquor store right now anyway

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Keep it in the basement. It would probably be fine at 75, but if it gets higher it could cause explosions (this is rare, but it does happen), and anything higher than 80 could kill the yeast causing undercarbonation. And it sounds like the basement will keep more consistent temperatures since the rest of the house gets the daily sunlight so the basement is your best option.

So bottling day is quickly approaching.  I got a bit anxious last night and decided to check the beer out pouring myself a small sample.  I could definitely smell apples, and basically tasted straight hop bitterness.  According to the Mr. Beer video, it's not ready if it tastes sweet, and ready if it tastes like flat beer.  I still plan on waiting till Thursday but does it sound like my beer is ready or should I wait even longer?  

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If it tastes/smells like apples, you should leave it for another week. That's acetaldehyde and is a byproduct of fermentation. Most people refer to it as "green" and it could be an indication that the beer isn't ready to bottle yet. After the yeast have consumed the sugars, they will start "cleaning" the beer by consuming some of the byproducts including acetaldehyde. But depending on how much acetaldehyde there is, it may not completely get rid of it.

 

The real key to reducing acetaldehyde is prevention. The main culprits of this chemical are pitching yeast too warm and fermenting too warm. It's usually recommended to pitch your yeast cool (below 80) and ferment on the lower end of the temp scale (below 70) to reduce the production of acetaldehyde. Bottle conditioning can also help reduce it, but it could take a very long time and the difference may be negligible.

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If it tastes/smells like apples, you should leave it for another week. That's acetaldehyde and is a byproduct of fermentation. Most people refer to it as "green" and it could be an indication that the beer isn't ready to bottle yet. After the yeast have consumed the sugars, they will start "cleaning" the beer by consuming some of the byproducts including acetaldehyde. But depending on how much acetaldehyde there is, it may not completely get rid of it.

 

The real key to reducing acetaldehyde is prevention. The main culprits of this chemical are pitching yeast too warm and fermenting too warm. It's usually recommended to pitch your yeast cool (below 80) and ferment on the lower end of the temp scale (below 70) to reduce the production of acetaldehyde. Bottle conditioning can also help reduce it, but it could take a very long time and the difference may be negligible.

 

Well I definitely know I have not made this batch in an area too warm (as stated in earlier posts, basement is around 65 degrees, wort has never gotten above 70 (high krauzen peak)).  Could the opposite be the cause?  Being that other than when the beer was in krauzen, I have found the temperature to be kinda low.  For the most part when I have checked it, it's been around 65-66 which I know to be below the optimal directed temperature for the beer (diablo ipa).  But I have left it where it is due to the directive of the boards here.  So I guess my question is, in theory is my beer actually on track, it's just taking longer because it's a couple degrees too cool?  

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Well I definitely know I have not made this batch in an area too warm (as stated in earlier posts, basement is around 65 degrees, wort has never gotten above 70 (high krauzen peak)).  Could the opposite be the cause?  Being that other than when the beer was in krauzen, I have found the temperature to be kinda low.  For the most part when I have checked it, it's been around 65-66 which I know to be below the optimal directed temperature for the beer (diablo ipa).  But I have left it where it is due to the directive of the boards here.  So I guess my question is, in theory is my beer actually on track, it's just taking longer because it's a couple degrees too cool?  

 

I keep my brew room at 65 degrees. Low temps won't cause off-flavors like high temps will. While you're correct that the fermentation was a bit slower than usual due to the temps, a slow and low fermentation time/temp is ideal.

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That is the temp I ferment at (I have a temp controlled chamber). 65 is my wort temp not the chamber's ambient temperature.

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I keep my brew room at 65 degrees. Low temps won't cause off-flavors like high temps will. While you're correct that the fermentation was a bit slower than usual due to the temps, a slow and low fermentation time/temp is ideal.

Well alright, I will let it sit another week....This waiting thing is starting to become difficult for me :(

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Well alright, I will let it sit another week....This waiting thing is starting to become difficult for me :(

 

Get a pipeline going and the waiting won't be so bad. ;) 

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On May 28th you posted this issue. You were at 2 weeks. One more week is June 4th, i.e. 2 days from now. It's not 1 week from now. You should bottle in 2 days.

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On May 28th you posted this issue.  You were at 2 weeks.  One more week is June 4th, i.e. 2 days from now.  It's now 1 week from now.  You should bottle in 2 days.

Even though I got the apple smell when I tested it yesterday....and JoshR said I should give it another week?

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Going another week definitely won't hurt. It may not get rid of all the green apple flavor/aroma, but it might help some.

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Going another week definitely won't hurt. It may not get rid of all the green apple flavor/aroma, but it might help some.

 

Alright then, it's settled.  I shall charge thru the fog of war into unknown territory this Thursday evening!  

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Alright then, it's settled.  I shall charge thru the fog of war into unknown territory this Thursday evening!  

Never charge into the fog.  Always send scouts... like a brother-in-law.

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My brother in law smokes but my Hydrometer works good every time. 65 is cool for my environment but I do not have a controlled fermenting fridge like some. The T-05 is forgiving and the brew should be super.

 

M

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I've been reading a book about brewing that I picked up recently, and I thought of this thread when I came across this part:

"I assume you all know how to bottle beer; it's a basic step. Rack beer from the fermenter into a bottling bucket, add priming sugar, and then siphon into bottles. Cap, and let naturally carbonate at room temperature for a week or two, then chill to serving temperature." -Gordon Strong, "Brewing Better Beer".

I figured y'all should send him a bunch of Tweets or e-mails saying "No, it's 4 weeks". :lol:

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UPDATE an extra week can make a huge diffrence!~!!!!!!!!!!!!! the beer is definatly more drinkable, more flavour and better all around. i'm sorry i "wasted" those earlier brew due to impatience

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UPDATE an extra week can make a huge diffrence!~!!!!!!!!!!!!! the beer is definatly more drinkable, more flavour and better all around. i'm sorry i "wasted" those earlier brew due to impatience

 

We all have done this as noobs and we learn that valuable lesson of time curing many ills (and many off-flavors in homebrews). I would advise letting it go for another week or two but you also don't want to go past 5 weeks of the batch sitting on your yeast cake.  I will advise you to purchase a hydrometer and check OG original gravity before you add the yeast to the fermenter and then check your FG final gravity so that you will know when it is ready or almost ready to bottle. Food for thought. 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_%28alcoholic_beverage%29#Specific_gravity

 

Salud my Friends

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I allowed my first batch (standard Octoberfest) ferment at too high a temp. and it came out cidery. That was eight weeks ago, and it has gotten noticeably better with each passing week.

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i always save a bottle to share with the old man and he agreed that this batch turned out even better then the first(a CAL)like i said waiting the extra time was well worth it

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