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Badgerfan

Overflowing Bottles

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I allowed my batch of Noche de Luna to ferment for four weeks in the LBK in the basement where the air temperature is a pretty constant 66 degrees. I bottled in 12 oz. bottles with 3/4 teaspoon of table sugar. I kept the bottles upstairs to condition at around 70 degrees or so. At three weeks I gave some a try and thought it was pretty good but needed a bit more conditioning. I threw some in the fridge yesterday morning and pulled one out last evening to test. I opened the bottle and to my surprise sprayed beer all over the kitchen. I opened up another half dozen and three of them were fine while the others overflowed into the sink. They were obviously overcarbonated but I am surprised that they were fine two weeks ago but not now. The temperature in the house has gone up a bit (spring arrives late in this part of the country) so I am considering letting future batches carbonate/condition in the basement where the temperature is a bit lower. I put the rest of this batch in the fridge hoping any remaining good bottles will remain that way.

 

Any thoughts/experiences would be appreciated.

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Could be a gusher infection  I haven't has one yet but check the beer line in the bottles for a thin film of crud.

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Never heard of the gusher infection but the ferment temps are a bit low. When we have low temps yeast is resting and not performing. Once a resting yeast goes into the bottle. Ka-blooey.

 

I had this problem when starting with coolers and ice bottles but after a few warm swings while I was away these cases are carbing fine in the 68 -74 range. still icing in the coolers and boxes when needed. Just hope for the best and keep a constant carb temp for positive results. Longer carbing time might help and you can test one here and there after the 4 week mark.

 

I use a 1/2 tsp + 1/8 tsp on the 12 oz. which is real close to to the 3/4 but still a bit more work for the yeast. If you have a hydrometer it helps to determine if the fermentation is complete.

 

Keep us posted, Cheers M

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MnM thanks for the input I just picked up a hydrometer and will give that a try on my next batch. I am wondering if the fermentation wasn't finished but after 4 weeks I would think it was done.. I suspect the higher conditioning temp the last couple of weeks made a difference. I just opened another one up and it was fine, I am hoping this was just an isolated problem.

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Higher conditioning temp should not matter, likely sanitation issue or too much sugar in bottles.

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Hi Rick, Happy Memorial Day folks,

 

I agree that condition temps should not matter much but if the wort ferment was not completely satisfied. Lower or average temps might keep the beer from imploding the bottle.

 

Longer than average condition time might yield the best results with temp. Just a hunch.

 

Sorry for the run on frag writing but I been up all night working.

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I would guess inconsistent measuring of your sugar and beer in the bottles.

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Other than one glaring mistake, I use sugar cubes and so measuring is not likely, for me it must be that even after 3 weeks my wort is not always ready. 

So temperature probably is the culprit.

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Hi Rick, Happy Memorial Day folks,

 

I agree that condition temps should not matter much but if the wort ferment was not completely satisfied. Lower or average temps might keep the beer from imploding the bottle.

 

Longer than average condition time might yield the best results with temp. Just a hunch.

 

Sorry for the run on frag writing but I been up all night working.

 

He mentioned that he fermented for 4 weeks at around 66 - 70. That should have been more than enough time to ferment the yeast. Especially considering that I ferment for 3 weeks at 65 with no issues. As Rick and Vakko pointed out, this was probably either an infection, or inconsistent sugar measurements.

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He mentioned that he fermented for 4 weeks at around 66 - 70. That should have been more than enough time to ferment the yeast. Especially considering that I ferment for 3 weeks at 65 with no issues. As Rick and Vakko pointed out, this was probably either an infection, or inconsistent sugar measurements.

 

I thought that I was pretty careful about the sugar measurements but I can't imagine what else could have caused the problem.  I put the remainder of the beer in the refrigerator and haven't had a problem since. Would letting the beer cool off for a few days make a difference? I am thinking that it would have decreased the pressure a bit.

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  I put the remainder of the beer in the refrigerator and haven't had a problem since.

That almost sounds like some bottles weren't as disinfected as they could've been

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cooling the bottles forces the co2 into solution rather than floating on top of the beer. when you open a bottle that has co2 sitting on top instead of being in solution, it creates a gusher.

 

i made a saison.  the style calls for the beer to be spritzy ... bordering on overcarbed.  (imo).  since i almost never chill my beer because i dont like how it changes the taste, every bottle tries to be a gusher no matter how slowly i try to open  it.  the only solution i found is to chill for a few days. this usually fixes the problem.

 

i dont know why but to me, a chilled beer tastes muddled.. the flavors just dont seem to pop no matter what style.  when i drink them at room temp it is a profoundly better experience.

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Hats off to you Zorak, Most Englishmen prefer and much of Europe have a pub that serves room temp ale and beer.

 

 

Cheers

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I thought that I was pretty careful about the sugar measurements but I can't imagine what else could have caused the problem.  I put the remainder of the beer in the refrigerator and haven't had a problem since. Would letting the beer cool off for a few days make a difference? I am thinking that it would have decreased the pressure a bit.

 

Oh, so the beers were warm when you opened them? That would be the issue then. Just like opening a warm bottle of champagne, opening warm homebrew will cause gushers. As Zorak pointed out, Co2 goes into solution when the liquid is cold. That's why our instructions recommend refrigerating the beer for a few days. This allows the Co2 to dissolve into the beer.

EDIT: Looking back at your original post, I noticed you only refrigerated for one day. That may not have been enough time for the Co2 to settle into the liquid.

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Thanks to all who responded looks like I have to be sure the beer has been properly chilled before opening. To avoid running out of cold beer I may have to invest in a separate refrigerator. I just have to convince my wife that it will save money in the long run because I won't be pouring all of that beer foam down the drain....................

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random thoughts..  the thin line in the bottle is just dried bottle krausen often.  I have it on many of my bottles.  sugar in bottle + yeast = fermentation = krausen + trub.


 


gusher bug... is apparently a real thing that I don't think anyone has the definitive answer to its cause.  on another forum, one of the regulars got gushers every time he made a batch of beer with a UK chocolate malt. I think it may have been that the malt was harvested wet allowing something to culture on it... which made its way into the beer... which consistently caused over-carbonation.


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