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joecolley

The lucky charms milk stout!

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Let me start by saying I am a craft beer dork big time and this one stacks up. I sneaked a bottle of the lucky charms milk stout a little early (3 weeks) because I was immensely curious. Let me tell you this beer is amazing. I was completely blown away. It starts like a Left Hand milk stout (which I love) but better. Then that finish is a very complex, a nice sweetness but not overly sweet, it plays off the roasted base flavor so well. I know the recipe is no longer available on here but I highly recommend piecing one together and brewing it up.

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Glad you enjoyed it! I know many people were skeptical, as was I at first. But after trying the original from Black Bottle Brewing Company, I said to myself, "I have to make this!!". It is a mighty fine brew. Stay tuned for another milk stout we're releasing within the next couple of weeks. It's called "Angry Bovine Milk Stout". It's equally as delicious. Maybe not "magically delicious", but close enough. lol

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this is good to hear, I purchased it but have not started it yet.  I was intrigued enough that I friended Black Bottle Brewing company on Facebook.  They really do make some crazy beers that makes me wish I was closer to Colorado.   The new one they just brewed was a kool aid ale.    In any event, thanks for the info on this, can't wait to get it started. 

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I am making this today. Found I only had 1/2 pack S-04  - hope it will do.

 

OK - I am going to ferment for 3 weeks not 2.

Instructions say add Lucky Charms cereal at 1 week into 2 week fermentation (also = 1 week from end).

 

So with a 3 week fermentation, do I still time it 1 week from beginning, or 1 week before END of fermentation?.

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Magically Delicious! We got a bottle of the brew hat the Mr Beer recipe is based off of. We tried it at Black Bottle Brewing when we were in CO and had to bring a bottle back to CA!

post-65452-0-43048300-1434143781_thumb.j

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Hmm, I am not getting big foam on my stout ferment, but 2 hours after pitching the keg was up to 74.5 deg (room temp 66) which I figured was a bit on the hot side so I sat it on freezer packs and turned up the AC now it is 62 with room temp 61 and still no foam. Did I cool it too much too fast?

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Yeah - this S-04 isn't - but it sure made a lot of heat in the first day.

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OK, I had the single serving tub, it was a bit more than a cup but I put it all in today anyway. I hope it won't be too charming.

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Well, Yes and No.....Well, I had a bottle and it was really nice. Took a  bottle to a party and  lady next door drank it all and loved it.

I still have some left, and will drink those as the mood takes me alternating with other brews.

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started mine on Saturday night.  I think high krausen has come and gone already.  yesterday evening (24 hours) it was looking like it was going to blow the top.. I put the LBK on a cookie sheet to catch any run off.  the LBK is currently on the basement floor, at about 61 to 63 degrees.  (fridge is currently chilling some bottled beer :().  Check this morning, not only did it not overflow, but it looks to be receding.  

 

The recipe says this (not a direct quote):  bring water to a boil, add LME, stir until 'hot break'.  lower temps as needed to reduce foam...  So is there a range of how long this should take?  I was stirring regularly for probably more than 20 minutes.. adjusting temp as needed.  

 

Also - and don't yell at me - I tinkered... I added 4 oz. maltodextrin to the boiling water.  every brew i've added that too, i've enjoyed the results... so I wanted to make sure I had that in this brew too.  Would that affect the time to 'hot break'?  ah - questions that should be asked beforehand, right?  

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Hey guys,

 

I will bottle tomorrow and I was wondering if for this beer should I add half carbo drops instead of 3/4 since I never had the feeling that stouts are that carbonated.

Do you have any suggestions? Thanks!

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www.screwybrewer.com for a calculator that you can use to determine the exact amount.

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Thanks Rick, I know that site but I am using the carbo drops and I was wondering if I could use half of a single pill.

Just double checking if someone on the forum carbonated this beer with the drops.

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Likely I will start another batch this Learn to Homebrew Day, since it requires Hop Boiling and is an interesting beer to discuss.

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I am really interested in making a version of this breakfast cereal beer but I have one question about the recipe: it refers to boiling extract until there is a hot break but I would have thought that hot breaks would have been dealt with when the extract was made since the extract is concentrated wort, isn't it? I thought boiling extract was only to sanitize the extract and that there was no benefit in heating extract for relatively long periods - and in fact there would be significant disadvantages to applying too much heat (darkening of the color - amongst other issues in lighter colored ales). In fact I was planning on tweaking the recipe to simply boil the hops in water with the understanding that the water will have a different pH than water plus LME but presumably the hops are not being added for their bitterness as much as for their flavor so the pH of the water is less important.. Am I way off base here?

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I can only partially offer thoughts...  for the break, I assumed it was to get to the point to not worry about foam over during the simmering that follows...  water plus LME (is this really considered wort at this point?), find the hot break, then simmer (only) the wort for a duration of time while adding hops.  remove from heat, add HME... etc.  

 

It is an interesting question though, and further, is the LME and water considered wort? 

 

one thing I can answer in this particular case, is that boiling LME here will have zero effect on the color.  You're pretty much topped out on that from the use of the stout HME.  

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Totally agree with here , cowboykyle,  that given the color of the stout a maillard reaction is not going to further darken the beer in any obvious way, but I was really talking about the principle .. so if I wanted to brew a very pale ale, boiling what was an already boiled wort whether liquid or dry would result in a darker beer than might be expected..

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I brew extract (LME) batches.  I've never had a hot break - you normally don't get them with LME.  DME on the other hand can do it very quickly and violently.

 

All the recipes have a 60 minute boil.  I steep for 30, drain, dump in the LME, bring to a boil, then boil for 60 minutes adding hops as called for.  Yes, in doing it in this way you will slightly darken the brew, but there is no impact on flavor.  I lightest beers are ambers or reds, and they look just fine to me.  I hear that some brewers have an SRM chart and they hold their beer up to it to judge the exact color.  I, on the other hand, have a life...   :lol:

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Seems the original attempt at this by the same brewery was using Count Chocula cereal.

 

If I want to do that, should I use exactly the same recipe but different cereal?

 

Or should I use different malts and hops also?

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For that, I'd think you could use the exact same recipe.

 

I still sorta regret not "dry-hopping" my Irish Red with Honey Smacks...

 

 :)

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I brewed this and it turned out quite nice. Here are a few notes that would be helpful.

OG 1.056, FG 1.018

I removed the first hop sack when I transferred the wort to the fermenter, I think that's is a personal preference item, did not want this overly hoppy. I squeezed out a bunch of the goodness during the boil though.

I let this ferment for three weeks at 67 degrees to reach the final gravity value, also carbed in the bottle for three weeks at 69 degrees. I used Dry Malt Extract since in my experience it reduces the 'cidery' taste. I let it sit in the fridge for three days before drinking.

This is a great recipe- great flavor, good head, great color.

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Just a comment - your priming sugar will never give you a "cidery" taste. Doesn't matter what you use. You should look elsewhere in your process if you have any sort of "cidery" tastes. Just don't blame the priming sugar.

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Thanks. Experimenting with the off-flavors, besides priming sugar I've tried various things starting with the water. Spring, distilled, my own well. No difference really. I do take great care to sanitize. 

I did a Patriot Lager fermented at 62 degrees and it was cidery- the most by far.. I tend to find that Reds and Dark beers lack the cidery flavor.

Maybe this is a topic for a new thread...

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Yeah, this is a bit confusing to me as well. I made Chewbeerca and the LME did not break. I was under the assumption that LME doesn't break but DME does. (I found that out the hard way with my first boil over). 

 

Also, anyone have a recommendation for conditioning? 3-4-1?

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3-4 is the overall guideline.  Higher gravity beers or beers with things like fruit or honey added to them, need longer conditioning.  One rule of thumb is that if you subtract the leading one from the OG that's the minimum number of weeks, so a 1.062 beer would be 6+ weeks.  The exception are beers that are very hoppy, as hoppy beers are best consumed young.

 

3 days in the frig is a minimum time.  Refrigerate no more than you plan on drinking in 3 days.  

 

I update my frig weekly.  I put in 6 of each beer.  If the beer was put in at 4 weeks (not usual as i have a massive pipeline), I rotate it out at 5 and 6 weeks and put in bottles that conditioned longer.

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Has anyone calculated the OG and FG for this recipe? I'm not sure what to do about adding the cereal at two weeks. Or better yet, does anyone who brewed this care to share?

 

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Bhob I measured  OG 1.056, FG 1.01, see my post 12/27/2015. I added the cereal per the recipe and it turned out great.

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On ‎12‎/‎28‎/‎2015 at 9:00 PM, RickBeer said:

3 weeks in bottles isn't long enough. 

I just opened one today that I bottled last November and it was wonderful.

I added the cereal timed as per recipe. I sterilized bag with boiling water then put cereal in tied it and dropped it in the LBK. just make sure not to keep the lid off for long.

I used the complete single serving tub. 

 

This is the 2nd time I made this and it will not be the last.

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Bought myself 2 more of the single servings for future Cerealicious brews.

Note the cereal is seasonal so buy it NOW

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Yeah, this beer blew my mind. I was skeptical at first until receiving the samples from the brewery (Black Bottle Brewery) before putting the MRB recipe together. It was SOOO freaking good! I'd love to try their other cereal beers some day.

 

Funny story. The brewery bought their town's entire supply of Count Chocula. General Mills caught wind of this and you'd think they'd want to sue, but instead, they seen this as a valuable marketing opportunity and jumped on board. :)

 

http://www.eater.com/2014/10/20/7023081/craft-brewery-secretly-depletes-towns-count-chocula-supply

 

By the way, you can use any cereal in this, not just Lucky Charms...;)

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Bottled mine last weekend. I just couldn't get myself to toss the cereal in right from the box though, so I put it in the oven or 20 minutes at 170F first.

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10 hours ago, Bhob said:

Bottled mine last weekend. I just couldn't get myself to toss the cereal in right from the box though, so I put it in the oven or 20 minutes at 170F first.

 

Why? :blink:

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13 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

If it will not go off in the box and OK to eat,  it should be OK to put in I figure.

Thats what she said.

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On 2/27/2016 at 11:58 AM, Bhob said:

I thought that would be enough, but it wasn't I guess.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_heat_sterilization

 

 

There's absolutely no need for that. Do you realize how many preservatives are in Lucky Charms? It's as sterile as it can get. Trust me. In fact, the brewery uses boxes upon boxes and they don't sterilize their cereal. Why would you have to?

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Are you saying that Lucky Charms aren't "all natural"?  I'm shocked I tell you, shocked.  Appears they have a Triceratops ground up in there too... 

 

Lucky_Charms.jpg

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i actually have the angry bovine recipe,, what about that ,,then just add the lucky charms when your supposed to like in that recipe?,,, probally be like drinking a bowl of chocolate lucky charms goodness... hmmmm

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