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tekn50

Wheat and IPA conditions time

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I have read on here, that IPA and Wheat beers are better when they are young.  My question is how young?  3 weeks or 4, I have found that most of my beer has tasted it best at 8 weeks in the bottle.  This is the first time I have made either of these.

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A lot depends on the recipe and the ABV, but I usually am drinking my IPAs and wheats by the third week, though YMMV.

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Same with me.  The IPA I made, I was drinking at 3 weeks and wished I had started a week earlier.  My wheats are good at 4 (Deluxe Bavarian Weissbier), but they don't get worse as they get older - not like they sit for months or anything.  Next batch I do, I'll try a 3 week old bottle.

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I drink them as soon as they have carbonation. No conditioning time. Especially IPAs.

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If you're drying hopping something think to be consuming rather quickly or what's the point.

 

Some RIS' and barleywines are dry-hopped. Those condition for months and can age for years.

 

 :)

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Only light, friendly conversation going on here, Bill.

 

  :)

 

If something like a barleywine is dry-hopped, and over time loses 80% of the hops' viability, that's still 20% that it wouldn't have had it not been dry-hopped. Plus, hops have other characteristics beyond just the aroma & flavour - don't forget they are naturally anti-bacterial as well.

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Yeah hard to get upset about beer, unless someone spills mine or the waitress takes my glass with the last sip I was saving.. grrr.

 

You can get those other characteristics from the boil though.  From the batches I've dry-hopped and aged i've noticed the dry hop aroma quality completely disappear after 6 months.  So I'm no longer dry hopping anything I'm aging for long periods of time as it appears to be a waste of money imho.  I will still do my bitter and favor boils though.

 

I'm doing a whole leaf dry hop right now and I can't wait to test this again  ;).

 

Interesting dry-hop technique here...

http://handsonbrewing.com/brewers-reference/process/dry-hopping-the-proper-way/

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Thank you for the replies.  I have tried one of each now.  The Orange Wheat  needs another week, but the amped up Diablo  is ready.  I put 3 bottles of the IPA in the fridge.  They are both at 3 weeks in the bottle, conditioning at 68 degrees.  These are the two best beers I have made yet.  Most of the ones I have made were ok to good.  But these two have just turned out great.

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I guess I should brew just the Diablo plain, then... I tried my sample-bottle of my Helluva IPA (Diablo with a little DME and some steeping grains) and while the "bottling sample" tasted excellent, 10 days carb/conditioning showed me that it is a rather mediocre brew. Not bad, but nothing to be proud of, unfortunately. I'll let these go for three weeks total and see if it improves.

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I added 1 lb of Pilsen light DME and an oz of Galaxy Hops to Diablo.  It was one of the better beers I've made and was better younger than older.

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I added a half pound of light pilsen dme.  Then did a 20 min boil with .25oz each of Cascade, Columbus, and Centennial.  With another .25 oz of Cascade at flame out, and dry hopped with a half oz of Columbus.   

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I just dry hopped my Diablo with 1 oz Cascade for 7 days before bottling. It still had great aroma after a few months. Adding Malt will tend to reduce the existing bitterness anyway. I found it was bitter enough and the dry hop balanced nose to tongue well.

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I used 1/2 oz of FF7Cs at 22 minutes, 1/2 oz of Centennial at 7 minutes, and dry-hopped with 1/2 oz of the FF7Cs. The bottling sample was amazing, like something Stone would have made. The 10-day old lightly carbed brew - not that great.

 

 :(

 

I think next IPA I make, there will only be really-late additions to the boil, and/or hopstands, for maximum flavour & aroma (besides the bittering addition, if not using MrB ingredients).

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I drink them as soon as they have carbonation. No conditioning time. Especially IPAs.

How exactly can I tell when it should be fully carbonated?  My Diablo has been in the bottle for 3 weeks today, and actually this morning, I went and did a squeeze test and there was still a bit of give in the bottle.  I am using the plastic half liter Mr. Beer bottles.  Should I be expecting it to be the same firmness as say a 2 liter of soda?  When you try to squeeze those (when unopened) they are completely firm and the bottle has no give.  

 

Is that what I should be looking for to know it's for sure carbonated?  I can always pour one and just see for myself but I don't like wasting beer.  Alternatively, I have been stockpiling glass bottles from store bought beer that I have been drinking (while waiting on mine to be g2g), and I was curious how you would know when a beer is carbonated in a glass bottle?  Obviously you would not be able to do a squeeze test so is the only way to check a glass bottle to just open it and pour?  

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How exactly can I tell when it should be fully carbonated?  My Diablo has been in the bottle for 3 weeks today, and actually this morning, I went and did a squeeze test and there was still a bit of give in the bottle.  I am using the plastic half liter Mr. Beer bottles.  Should I be expecting it to be the same firmness as say a 2 liter of soda?  When you try to squeeze those (when unopened) they are completely firm and the bottle has no give.  

 

Is that what I should be looking for to know it's for sure carbonated?  I can always pour one and just see for myself but I don't like wasting beer.  Alternatively, I have been stockpiling glass bottles from store bought beer that I have been drinking (while waiting on mine to be g2g), and I was curious how you would know when a beer is carbonated in a glass bottle?  Obviously you would not be able to do a squeeze test so is the only way to check a glass bottle to just open it and pour?  

 

If you leave it out for the recommended amount of time and temperature and you used the recommended amount of sugar, there's no reason why it wouldn't be carbonated. I don't need to squeeze test my glass bottles because I already know they're carbonated because I followed the instructions. ;)

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If you leave it out for the recommended amount of time and temperature and you used the recommended amount of sugar, there's no reason why it wouldn't be carbonated. I don't need to squeeze test my glass bottles because I already know they're carbonated because I followed the instructions. ;)

Well I used the carbo drops and left them in my cooler basement to avoid them being in my super hot house during the day just as a certain CSR of Mr. Beer recommended.  So I think that you could say I followed the directions, didn't I  ;)

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