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JoshR

Introducing Mr. Beer Bread!!

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We're proud to announce our newest product, Mr. Beer Bread! All you provide is 12 oz of beer, mix, and bake!! We tried most of these in the office and they're DELICIOUS! You can use any beer so feel free to experiment and see which flavors compliment what bread the best.

Also, do you use steeping grains in your beer? Try adding a sprinkle of spent grains to the mix for a more complex flavor and texture.

This is a great product that I'm personally very excited about because I love making my own beer, cheese, and bread. Cheers! :D

http://www.mrbeer.com/logo-gear?food=85

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Josh,

Quit loafing around. Taking a slice of your day to be a gluten and gourge yourself on beer bread is not right. We need proof about this process so we can sponge in the knowledge. Sitting on your couche and blabbing about all your dough is frankly quite kneading.

 

Edit: How many baking terms are in the paragraph above?  Answer below.

 

 

Ten.

 

Quit loafing around. Taking a slice of your day to be a gluten and gourge yourself on beer bread is not right. We need proof about this process so we can sponge in the knowledge. Sitting on your couche and blabbing about all your dough is frankly quite kneading

 

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yea I read on the internet sumwhere where a guy who's an avid brewer uses his sparged malts to make homemade bread. claims its his granma's recipe.

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I'll try it out.  At one of my local HB stores they press their used grains into dog biscuits.  Apparently dogs love them.

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we recycle out spent grains. wife dries them in the oven. I pulse them in the blender into dust... and when we make bread, she added about half the flour and tops it off with our 'flour'. makes good bread. beats wasting them or throwing them out.

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Looks good, but I am not sure how I am going to calm my beer down at room temp to pour in any civilized way (fountain).

Can it be poured then allowed to warm up or is the carbonation essential to the bread product?

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Looks good, but I am not sure how I am going to calm my beer down at room temp to pour in any civilized way (fountain).

Can it be poured then allowed to warm up or is the carbonation essential to the bread product?

 

Carbonation is not required. In fact, I usually use flat beer when baking/cooking. I rarely throw any beer away even if it's slightly contaminated. It can still be used for cooking and baking with great results.

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    My wife makes an annual Jamaican Easter Bun (basically a sweet desert bread with anise seeds, raisins, and dates) that uses Guinness Stout as a leavening agent. It's really good warm with a slice of sharp cheddar on it. And, if you happen to buy "calming dog biscuits" they all list brewers yeast as a major ingredient.

 

Best, Zoot

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most of my recycled? reclaimed? spent grain from steeping and all grain batches was turned into coarse flour.  wife just made 3 loaves where 1 part was regular flour, 2 were from what I ground... mostly dark grains.  she added some caraway seeds.

 

super dense bread! super dark... I can taste smoked wheat, chocolate... rye....   it has almost the taste of a dark pumpernickel.   cover a slice with wifes home made farmers cheese... wash it down with beer... yum.

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I'll try it out. At one of my local HB stores they press their used grains into dog biscuits. Apparently dogs love them.

I'll vouch for the dogs on this. My dogs love the spent grains. A little flour and some peanut butter. Mix, then rollout the dough. Use a cookie cutter for shaped then bake for 1/2 an hour.

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I'll vouch for the dogs on this. My dogs love the spent grains. A little flour and some peanut butter. Mix, then rollout the dough. Use a cookie cutter for shaped then bake for 1/2 an hour.

 

 

What shapes due the dogs like best?   :lol:

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I actually have a "bone-shaped" cookie cutter just for making doggie-biscuits with.

 

 :)

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Just found this thread and I think that it needs to be said that you need to be careful about what grains you give to a dog. My understanding is that hops can make a dog very sick so any grains that have been in contact with hops should not become dog biscuits. Now that is not a likely issue but it is a possible one. Hops and dogs do not mix.

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/hops/

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Grains used are pre-boil, therefore no hops. You remove the grain and then add hops.

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Just found this thread and I think that it needs to be said that you need to be careful about what grains you give to a dog. My understanding is that hops can make a dog very sick so any grains that have been in contact with hops should not become dog biscuits. Now that is not a likely issue but it is a possible one. Hops and dogs do not mix.

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/hops/

 

Grains don't get mixed with hops. The hops are added during the boil, long after the grains have already been removed.

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Huh.  Here I came to this thread thinking that Mr. Beer "Bread" was some kind of sixties/seventies reference to money and they had some kind of coupon deal going on.

 

<ChuckN quietly slips out the back door and over to the next thread.>

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My wife today asked if the Barley Malt Syrup her bread recipes call for is the some as my LME.  From what I can tell it is the same.

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Carbonation is not required. In fact, I usually use flat beer when baking/cooking. I rarely throw any beer away even if it's slightly contaminated. It can still be used for cooking and baking with great results.

 

Throw beer away?  An unusual concept.

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On ‎10‎/‎24‎/‎2015 at 7:43 AM, Nickfixit said:

 

Throw beer away?  An unusual concept.

Hey. You've dumped every beer you've ever bought or made down the toilet. Of course you filtered it through your liver first.

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