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idyllbeer

Classic American Light in bottle one week/can't monitor temp 2nd week

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Hello, 

 

First brew and first post so please bear with me.  I have a Classic American light bottled for one week and in a room at 72 degrees in a ice chest.  I need to leave my location and will not be able to monitor the temps for six days.  I don't want to leave the A/C on during this time and think the room temps will be in the 80's during the day in my absence.  Should I put the beer in the refrigerator even though the temp will be much lower the ideal  and I still have one week minimum to go on the carbonating?  

 

Any other ideas that don't cost lots of money?

 

Bob

 

 

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If you put the bottles in the refrigerator that will put the yeast to sleep (no conditioning). You could place some frozen bottles in the ice chest with your beer. The temps might dip down to around 60 (maybe into the high 50's) but they should bounce back by the end of the 6 days. They definitely won't get as cold as the refrigerator. When you get back you can go back to conditioning as usual.

 

Just my $0.02

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It's my understanding that it's find for your bottles to condition at 80 degrees.  No need to worry about it. You're not fermenting the wort but adding conditioning and carbonation.

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80 is ok. 80s MAY be ok, some do it, I never have. OP said 80s.

I would think the ice chest would insulate the beer from the temps. Heat rises, put cooler in coolest spot you have.

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My two cents: if you think the temperature in your "brewery" will be in the 80's I would fill a basin or bath with a few inches of water and cover the LBK with a wet towel whose ends are in the water. The heat in the room (and the "heat" of the surface of the LBK  will make the water in the towel evaporate and that evaporation will reduce the temperature of the towel  and that temperature difference between the room and the towel will pull air across the keg carrying the warmer air away (It's a little like a passive energy free air-conditioner). If there is enough water in the basin/bath then this effect will continue until you return. The drop in temperature will not be huge... but it ought to be significant.

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I was thinking same. And if you can get a draft across the towel so much the better. You might not want to leave a fan going to blow on towel while away but that would help too. If you have an AC duct suitable you could make that blow on it I guess.

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I say put a couple of 2L frozen bottle in there until you get back. It might drop the temp down enough to put the yeast asleep for a couple of days but should level out until you get back. At least it wouldn't be AS dramatic. Depends on how insulated your cooler is. Trying using large, heavy, blankets or sleeping bags to wrap the cooler in.

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Hello, 

 

First brew and first post so please bear with me.  I have a Classic American light bottled for one week and in a room at 72 degrees in a ice chest.  I need to leave my location and will not be able to monitor the temps for six days.  I don't want to leave the A/C on during this time and think the room temps will be in the 80's during the day in my absence.  Should I put the beer in the refrigerator even though the temp will be much lower the ideal  and I still have one week minimum to go on the carbonating?  

 

Any other ideas that don't cost lots of money?

 

Bob

 

I went on vacation in May for 2 weeks and left 100 bottles of my beer in the house during that time.  We set the A/C at 85 degrees so that was likely the temperature in the house.  The beer seems fine and I find no issues with taste or anything.  All the beer was at least a couple of weeks past bottling so the carbonation was complete.  Conditioning happens until you put it in the refrigerator.

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Thank you to all that replied.  Your info was very helpful.  I can now leave without a concern over my beer!  Have a Happy 4th!

 

Bob

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